The Boatniks (1970)

G | 100 mins | Comedy | 1 July 1970

Director:

Norman Tokar

Producer:

Ron Miller

Cinematographer:

William Snyder

Production Designers:

Hilyard Brown, John Mansbridge

Production Company:

Walt Disney Productions
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HISTORY

On 3 Oct 1967, LAT announced that television writer Marty Roth was set to make his feature film debut with The Boatniks, produced by Ron Miller for Walt Disney Productions. Two years later, however, the 14 Feb 1969 DV stated that Arthur Julian had been hired to work on the screenplay. Roth ultimately receives story credit.
       With Norman Tokar signed to direct, the 3 Sep 1969 DV reported Disney’s budget estimate of $2.5 million. A 15 Sep 1969 DV news story indicated that the six-week shooting schedule began that day in Newport Beach, CA. According to a 9 Nov 1979 LAT article, production required more than fifty boats, including an eight-foot dinghy and a seventy-five-foot luxury cruise liner. Local yachtsman Owen Minney served as a consultant and helped organize boat stunts, and his experience on the picture inspired him to open Cinemafloat, a Newport Beach-based business specializing in providing boats and nautical props for film productions.
       A 30 Jul 1969 Var brief announcing the casting of Phil Silvers also included his former co-star of The Phil Silvers Show (CBS, 20 Sep 1955—11 Sep 1959), Harvey Lembeck, among the cast, but Lembeck does not appear in the final film. Items in the 23 Sep 1969, 21 Oct 1969, and 6 Feb 1970 issues also noted the involvement of Alice Backes, Jim Begg, and Playboy “Bunny” Sherry Bryson.
       According to a 1 Jul 1970 Var, the New York City playdates began that day at the Ziegfeld Theatre. More than a month later, the 12 Aug 1970 issue announced that Buena ... More Less

On 3 Oct 1967, LAT announced that television writer Marty Roth was set to make his feature film debut with The Boatniks, produced by Ron Miller for Walt Disney Productions. Two years later, however, the 14 Feb 1969 DV stated that Arthur Julian had been hired to work on the screenplay. Roth ultimately receives story credit.
       With Norman Tokar signed to direct, the 3 Sep 1969 DV reported Disney’s budget estimate of $2.5 million. A 15 Sep 1969 DV news story indicated that the six-week shooting schedule began that day in Newport Beach, CA. According to a 9 Nov 1979 LAT article, production required more than fifty boats, including an eight-foot dinghy and a seventy-five-foot luxury cruise liner. Local yachtsman Owen Minney served as a consultant and helped organize boat stunts, and his experience on the picture inspired him to open Cinemafloat, a Newport Beach-based business specializing in providing boats and nautical props for film productions.
       A 30 Jul 1969 Var brief announcing the casting of Phil Silvers also included his former co-star of The Phil Silvers Show (CBS, 20 Sep 1955—11 Sep 1959), Harvey Lembeck, among the cast, but Lembeck does not appear in the final film. Items in the 23 Sep 1969, 21 Oct 1969, and 6 Feb 1970 issues also noted the involvement of Alice Backes, Jim Begg, and Playboy “Bunny” Sherry Bryson.
       According to a 1 Jul 1970 Var, the New York City playdates began that day at the Ziegfeld Theatre. More than a month later, the 12 Aug 1970 issue announced that Buena Vista Film Distribution Co., Inc., had switched to a “showcase” pattern across twelve Manhattan theaters. The picture opened citywide in Los Angeles, CA, on 8 Jul 1970. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
14 Feb 1969
p. 2.
Daily Variety
7 Aug 1969
p. 2.
Daily Variety
3 Sep 1969
p. 10.
Daily Variety
15 Sep 1969
p. 4.
Daily Variety
23 Sep 1969
p. 4.
Daily Variety
21 Oct 1969
p. 4.
Daily Variety
6 Feb 1970
p. 2.
Los Angeles Times
3 Oct 1967
Section C, p. 10.
Los Angeles Times
28 Jun 1970
Section B, p. 7.
Los Angeles Times
10 Jul 1970
Section G, p. 18.
Los Angeles Times
9 Nov 1979
Section C, p. 1, 27.
New York Times
2 Jul 1970
p. 25.
Variety
30 Jul 1969
p. 77.
Variety
1 Jul 1970
p. 20.
Variety
12 Aug 1970
p. 23.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
2nd unit dir
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Prod
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Screen story & scr
Story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Asst cam
Asst cam
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
COSTUMES
SOUND
Sd supv
Sd mix
Music ed
Boom op
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Spec eff
Matte artist
MAKEUP
Hairstyles
Hairstyles
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit mgr
Scr supv
Stills
Gaffer
Prop master
Key grip
SOURCES
SONGS
"Boatniks," words and music by Robert F. Brunner and Bruce Belland.
DETAILS
Release Date:
1 July 1970
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 1 July 1970
Los Angeles opening: 8 July 1970
Production Date:
began 15 September 1969
Copyright Claimant:
Walt Disney Productions
Copyright Date:
21 May 1970
Copyright Number:
LP38057
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
100
MPAA Rating:
G
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Ensign Thomas Garland takes command of a busy harbor in Newport Beach, California. Although senior officer Commander Taylor is eager to have the son of an illustrious World War II hero under him, enthusiasm wanes upon discovery of the officer's incompetence. After introducing himself to rental operator Kate Fairchild by spilling yellow paint over her, Garland attempts to rescue a rowboat, in the process grounding his Coast Guard cutter. As three thieves, Harry, Max, and Charlie, escape through the fogbound harbor, they collide with Garland's vessel. The jewels, hidden in a picnic basket, sink to the ocean floor. To recover the basket the trio recruits a voluptuous Japanese pearl diver, thereby exciting the ensign's suspicion. Informed of these events by Garland, Taylor is incredulous until Moby Dick, Kate's pet pelican, pilfers a jewel-encrusted pickle. During the thieves' flight by submarine and seaplane the jewels are jettisoned. Garland recovers the cache, selecting from it an engagement ring for ... +


Ensign Thomas Garland takes command of a busy harbor in Newport Beach, California. Although senior officer Commander Taylor is eager to have the son of an illustrious World War II hero under him, enthusiasm wanes upon discovery of the officer's incompetence. After introducing himself to rental operator Kate Fairchild by spilling yellow paint over her, Garland attempts to rescue a rowboat, in the process grounding his Coast Guard cutter. As three thieves, Harry, Max, and Charlie, escape through the fogbound harbor, they collide with Garland's vessel. The jewels, hidden in a picnic basket, sink to the ocean floor. To recover the basket the trio recruits a voluptuous Japanese pearl diver, thereby exciting the ensign's suspicion. Informed of these events by Garland, Taylor is incredulous until Moby Dick, Kate's pet pelican, pilfers a jewel-encrusted pickle. During the thieves' flight by submarine and seaplane the jewels are jettisoned. Garland recovers the cache, selecting from it an engagement ring for Kate. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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