The Valley of Gwangi (1969)

G | 95 mins | Science fiction | 1969

Director:

Jim O'Connolly

Writer:

William E. Bast

Producer:

Charles H. Schneer

Cinematographer:

Erwin Hillier

Production Designer:

Gil Parrondo

Production Company:

Morningside Pictures
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HISTORY

On 4 Feb 1942, DV announced that production on Gwangi was being discontinued by RKO Pictures, with no immediate plans for its resumption. Producers John Speaks and Willis O’Brien were removed from the payroll two weeks earlier, and director Irving Reis was reportedly assigned to It Comes Up Love (1943, see entry).
       Twenty-five years later, the 8 Feb 1967 DV reported that Berkshire Productions had acquired the property. The original story was credited to Willis O’Brien. Principal photography began 8 Jul 1967 in Almeria, Spain, according to a 28 Jul 1967 DV production chart. The title was listed as The Valley — Time Forgot. A news item in the 2 Aug 1967 Var noted that the filmmakers were employing the “Dynamation” model animation process, developed by producer Charles H. Schneer and associate producer-visual effects artist Ray Harryhausen. A news item in the 27 Sep 1967 LAT stated that principal photography would be completed “within the next few days,” and referred to the film as The Lost Valley. The 6 Nov 1968 Var noted that the location crew was comprised of British and Spanish technicians. Post-production, which had been underway for the last several months in England, was in its final stages, and the current working title was The Valley Where Time Stood Still.
       As reported in the 18 Feb 1969 DV, the picture received a “G” rating from the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA). On 26 Feb 1969, Var ... More Less

On 4 Feb 1942, DV announced that production on Gwangi was being discontinued by RKO Pictures, with no immediate plans for its resumption. Producers John Speaks and Willis O’Brien were removed from the payroll two weeks earlier, and director Irving Reis was reportedly assigned to It Comes Up Love (1943, see entry).
       Twenty-five years later, the 8 Feb 1967 DV reported that Berkshire Productions had acquired the property. The original story was credited to Willis O’Brien. Principal photography began 8 Jul 1967 in Almeria, Spain, according to a 28 Jul 1967 DV production chart. The title was listed as The Valley — Time Forgot. A news item in the 2 Aug 1967 Var noted that the filmmakers were employing the “Dynamation” model animation process, developed by producer Charles H. Schneer and associate producer-visual effects artist Ray Harryhausen. A news item in the 27 Sep 1967 LAT stated that principal photography would be completed “within the next few days,” and referred to the film as The Lost Valley. The 6 Nov 1968 Var noted that the location crew was comprised of British and Spanish technicians. Post-production, which had been underway for the last several months in England, was in its final stages, and the current working title was The Valley Where Time Stood Still.
       As reported in the 18 Feb 1969 DV, the picture received a “G” rating from the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA). On 26 Feb 1969, Var announced the official title as The Valley of Gwangi.
       The film opened 17 Sep 1969 in Covina, CA. Despite a scathing review in the 24 Apr 1969 DV, the 17 Sep 1969 Var listed The Valley of Gwangi among the top-grossing current releases. However, the 16 Jan 1975 DV later revealed the picture was ultimately a financial failure.
More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
LOCATION
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
4 Feb 1962
p. 2.
Daily Variety
8 Feb 1967
p. 4.
Daily Variety
28 Jul 1967
p. 12.
Daily Variety
18 Feb 1969
p. 3.
Daily Variety
24 Apr 1969
p. 3.
Daily Variety
16 Jan 1975
p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
27 Sep 1967
Section D, p. 13.
Los Angeles Times
17 Sep 1969
Section F, p. 12.
Variety
2 Aug 1967
p. 24.
Variety
6 Nov 1968
p. 29.
Variety
26 Feb 1969
p. 28.
Variety
17 Sep 1969
p. 11.
Variety
29 Sep 1971
p. 10.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Charles H. Schneer Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Addl material
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
COSTUMES
Ward des
Ward supv
MUSIC
Mus comp & cond
VISUAL EFFECTS
Visual eff
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Prod supv
Horsemaster
Title des
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
The Valley--Where Time Stood Still
The Valley--Time Forgot
The Valley Time Forgot
Gwangi
The Lost Valley
The Valley Where Time Stood Still
Release Date:
1969
Premiere Information:
Detroit opening: 11 June 1969
Covina, CA, opening: 17 September 1969
Production Date:
8 July--late September or early October 1967
Copyright Claimant:
Morningside Pictures
Copyright Date:
1 June 1969
Copyright Number:
LP38136
Physical Properties:
Sound
Westrex
Color
Technicolor
Widescreen/ratio
Dynamation
Duration(in mins):
95
MPAA Rating:
G
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Promotor Tuck Kirby arrives in a small Mexican town to visit T. J. Breckenridge, his ex-partner and girl friend who now owns a financially troubled Wild West show. Tuck suggests that she sell the show and marry him, but T. J. boasts of a new attaction that promises to make her wealthy. She shows Tuck a miniature horse which she obtained from Carlos, a gypsy who defied native superstition by removing the creature from the nearby Forbidden Valley. Baffled, Tuck takes the tiny animal to British paleontologist Prof. Horace Bromley who claims that it belongs to a species believed to have been extinct for over 50 million years. Before the horse can be put on display, however, it is stolen by gypsies and returned to the Forbidden Valley. Despite warnings about Gwangi, the monstrous 14-foot reptile that rules the valley, Tuck, T. J., and several cowboys enter the area and find themselves in a prehistoric world. After one of the cowboys is carried off by a giant prehistoric creature, the men manage to capture Gwangi, and T. J. makes plans to put the monster on exhibition in her show. The gypsies intervene again, this time by setting the monster free. Gwangi kills the professor and rampages through the town until it traps Tuck and T. J. inside a cathedral. Tuck pierces the monster's skull with a lance, and Gwangi, after knocking over a burning lamp, dies in the fire as the two lovers ... +


Promotor Tuck Kirby arrives in a small Mexican town to visit T. J. Breckenridge, his ex-partner and girl friend who now owns a financially troubled Wild West show. Tuck suggests that she sell the show and marry him, but T. J. boasts of a new attaction that promises to make her wealthy. She shows Tuck a miniature horse which she obtained from Carlos, a gypsy who defied native superstition by removing the creature from the nearby Forbidden Valley. Baffled, Tuck takes the tiny animal to British paleontologist Prof. Horace Bromley who claims that it belongs to a species believed to have been extinct for over 50 million years. Before the horse can be put on display, however, it is stolen by gypsies and returned to the Forbidden Valley. Despite warnings about Gwangi, the monstrous 14-foot reptile that rules the valley, Tuck, T. J., and several cowboys enter the area and find themselves in a prehistoric world. After one of the cowboys is carried off by a giant prehistoric creature, the men manage to capture Gwangi, and T. J. makes plans to put the monster on exhibition in her show. The gypsies intervene again, this time by setting the monster free. Gwangi kills the professor and rampages through the town until it traps Tuck and T. J. inside a cathedral. Tuck pierces the monster's skull with a lance, and Gwangi, after knocking over a burning lamp, dies in the fire as the two lovers escape. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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