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HISTORY

One-act versions of the play were produced as early as 1904. Modern sources credit the editing to Mamie Wagner. Modern sources also credit Wilfred Buckland as art director, but this is incorrect. Buckland did not sign with the Lasky Feature Play Company until 19 May 1914, four months after The Squaw Man was completed. This was the first release of the Jesse L. Lasky Feature Play Co. Although this was not the first motion picture to be filmed in Hollywood, The Squaw Man was the first Hollywood-made feature-length production.
       The role of the boy, Hal, was portrayed by Carmen De Rue, who was billed variously as "Baby DeRue" and "Freddy DeRue," to mask the fact that she was a girl.
Cecil B. DeMille also directed two remakes of The Squaw Man , a silent in 1918, and a sound version for M-G-M in 1931, starring Warner Baxter (see ... More Less

One-act versions of the play were produced as early as 1904. Modern sources credit the editing to Mamie Wagner. Modern sources also credit Wilfred Buckland as art director, but this is incorrect. Buckland did not sign with the Lasky Feature Play Company until 19 May 1914, four months after The Squaw Man was completed. This was the first release of the Jesse L. Lasky Feature Play Co. Although this was not the first motion picture to be filmed in Hollywood, The Squaw Man was the first Hollywood-made feature-length production.
       The role of the boy, Hal, was portrayed by Carmen De Rue, who was billed variously as "Baby DeRue" and "Freddy DeRue," to mask the fact that she was a girl.
Cecil B. DeMille also directed two remakes of The Squaw Man , a silent in 1918, and a sound version for M-G-M in 1931, starring Warner Baxter (see entries). More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Moving Picture World
28 Feb 1914
pp. 1068-69.
Moving Picture World
7 Feb 1914
p. 730.
New York Dramatic Mirror
25 Feb 1914
p. 36.
Variety
20 Feb 1914
p. 23.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
WRITERS
Scenario
Scenario
PHOTOGRAPHY
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play The Squaw Man by Edwin Milton Royle (New York, 23 Oct 1905).
DETAILS
Release Date:
15 February 1914
Production Date:
Picture started 29 December 1913
Copyright Claimant:
Jesse L. Lasky Feature Play Co., Inc.
Copyright Date:
18 February 1914
Copyright Number:
LU2169
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in reels):
6
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

James Wynnegate is made executor of funds raised by members of his regiment for the families of men killed in battle. His cousin, the Earl of Kerhill, embezzles the funds, but Kerhill's wife Diana, with whom Wynnegate is in love, convinces the latter to take the blame and leave England in order to save the family's honor. Wynnegate eventually goes to Wyoming and buys a ranch using the name Jim Carston. He is saved from an attack by Cash Hawkins by the Indian maiden Nat-U-Ritch and he marries her when he learns that she is pregnant. Some time later, Diana comes West with news that Kerhill is dead, but that he had admitted his theft shortly before death. Nat-U-Ritch, knowing that her husband will send their young son Hal away, and hearing that she will be arrested for killing Hawkins, commits suicide. At the end, Diana embraces ... +


James Wynnegate is made executor of funds raised by members of his regiment for the families of men killed in battle. His cousin, the Earl of Kerhill, embezzles the funds, but Kerhill's wife Diana, with whom Wynnegate is in love, convinces the latter to take the blame and leave England in order to save the family's honor. Wynnegate eventually goes to Wyoming and buys a ranch using the name Jim Carston. He is saved from an attack by Cash Hawkins by the Indian maiden Nat-U-Ritch and he marries her when he learns that she is pregnant. Some time later, Diana comes West with news that Kerhill is dead, but that he had admitted his theft shortly before death. Nat-U-Ritch, knowing that her husband will send their young son Hal away, and hearing that she will be arrested for killing Hawkins, commits suicide. At the end, Diana embraces Hal. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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