Fort Utah (1967)

83 mins | Western | 24 May 1967

Director:

Lesley Selander

Producer:

A. C. Lyles

Cinematographer:

Lothrop Worth

Production Designers:

Hal Pereira, Al Roelofs

Production Company:

A. C. Lyles Productions
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HISTORY

Fort Utah was announced in a 21 Jul 1966 DV news item, which noted that producer A. C. Lyles hired Lesley Selander to direct the western for Paramount Pictures. Principal photography began shortly after on 26 Jul 1966, as noted in a 5 Aug 1966 DV production chart. The first two days of filming took place at Albertson Ranch in Thousand Oaks, CA. Afterward, production moved to the “permanent western set” on the Paramount studio lot in Hollywood, CA, according to an article in the 10 Aug 1966 LAT, which indicated that principal photography entailed only ten shooting days.
       Various contemporary sources, including the 1 Aug 1966 LAT, attributed the screenplay solely to Steve Fisher; however, reviews in the 25 May 1967 NYT and 26 May 1967 DV identified Fisher and Andrew Craddock as co-screenwriters.
       Peter Ireland, son of leading actor John Ireland, was set to play a role, as stated in a 28 Jul 1966 DV brief; and the following were listed as cast members in an 8 Aug 1966 DV item: Dolly Jarvis; Aileen Arnold; Rodney McGaughy; Stewart East (referred to as “Stu East”); and Lorraine ... More Less

Fort Utah was announced in a 21 Jul 1966 DV news item, which noted that producer A. C. Lyles hired Lesley Selander to direct the western for Paramount Pictures. Principal photography began shortly after on 26 Jul 1966, as noted in a 5 Aug 1966 DV production chart. The first two days of filming took place at Albertson Ranch in Thousand Oaks, CA. Afterward, production moved to the “permanent western set” on the Paramount studio lot in Hollywood, CA, according to an article in the 10 Aug 1966 LAT, which indicated that principal photography entailed only ten shooting days.
       Various contemporary sources, including the 1 Aug 1966 LAT, attributed the screenplay solely to Steve Fisher; however, reviews in the 25 May 1967 NYT and 26 May 1967 DV identified Fisher and Andrew Craddock as co-screenwriters.
       Peter Ireland, son of leading actor John Ireland, was set to play a role, as stated in a 28 Jul 1966 DV brief; and the following were listed as cast members in an 8 Aug 1966 DV item: Dolly Jarvis; Aileen Arnold; Rodney McGaughy; Stewart East (referred to as “Stu East”); and Lorraine Comfort. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
21 Jul 1966
p. 4.
Daily Variety
25 Jul 1966
p. 2.
Daily Variety
28 Jul 1966
p. 3.
Daily Variety
5 Aug 1966
p. 7.
Daily Variety
8 Aug 1966
p. 4.
Daily Variety
26 May 1967
p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
25 Jul 1966
Section C, p. 19.
Los Angeles Times
1 Aug 1966
Section C, p. 22.
Los Angeles Times
10 Aug 1966
Section D, p. 12.
Los Angeles Times
25 Nov 1966
Section D, p. 7.
New York Times
24 May 1967.
---
New York Times
25 May 1967.
---
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
An A. C. Lyles Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
MUSIC
Mus comp
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec photog eff
MAKEUP
Hairstyles
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
DETAILS
Release Date:
24 May 1967
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 24 May 1967
Production Date:
26 July--early August 1966
Copyright Claimant:
A. C. Lyles Productions
Copyright Date:
10 May 1967
Copyright Number:
LP34730
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Technicolor
Widescreen/ratio
Techniscope
Duration(in mins):
83
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

While riding through prairie country, ex-gunfighter Tom Horn meets an old friend, Indian agent Ben Stokes, and learns that the Indians have been set on the warpath by a mystery man called Dajin. The two friends spot a wagon train traveling through hostile territory without an Army escort; and while Horn joins the wagon train, Stokes heads for Fort Utah to summon troopers. Horn finds the wagon master unwilling to alarm the passengers; he remains with the group and becomes attracted to passenger Linda Lee. Stokes fails to return in two days, and Horn also rides off to the fort, which he finds deserted. He wanders inside and is knocked out and held prisoner along with Stokes. It is revealed that Dajin is a mutinous Army sergeant who has formed a gang of renegade troopers, murdered the fort personnel, and massacred an encampment of Indian women and children. Horn and Stokes succeed in overpowering two of the three men guarding the fort, but the third escapes to warn Dajin. Meanwhile, the Indians attack the wagon train, and the few survivors make their way to the fort. Eventually Dajin appears and begs to be saved from the marauding Indians. He is admitted but once inside attempts a double cross and is shot down. Knowing that the Indians will demand Dajin alive, Horn and Stokes strap his dead body to a saddled horse and ride through the gates of the fort with him. A volley of shots riddle Dajin's body, and satisfied, the Indians withdraw. Horn joins the wagon train on its journey westward and anticipates a bright future with Linda ... +


While riding through prairie country, ex-gunfighter Tom Horn meets an old friend, Indian agent Ben Stokes, and learns that the Indians have been set on the warpath by a mystery man called Dajin. The two friends spot a wagon train traveling through hostile territory without an Army escort; and while Horn joins the wagon train, Stokes heads for Fort Utah to summon troopers. Horn finds the wagon master unwilling to alarm the passengers; he remains with the group and becomes attracted to passenger Linda Lee. Stokes fails to return in two days, and Horn also rides off to the fort, which he finds deserted. He wanders inside and is knocked out and held prisoner along with Stokes. It is revealed that Dajin is a mutinous Army sergeant who has formed a gang of renegade troopers, murdered the fort personnel, and massacred an encampment of Indian women and children. Horn and Stokes succeed in overpowering two of the three men guarding the fort, but the third escapes to warn Dajin. Meanwhile, the Indians attack the wagon train, and the few survivors make their way to the fort. Eventually Dajin appears and begs to be saved from the marauding Indians. He is admitted but once inside attempts a double cross and is shot down. Knowing that the Indians will demand Dajin alive, Horn and Stokes strap his dead body to a saddled horse and ride through the gates of the fort with him. A volley of shots riddle Dajin's body, and satisfied, the Indians withdraw. Horn joins the wagon train on its journey westward and anticipates a bright future with Linda Lee. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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