Waterhole #3 (1967)

95 mins | Western, Comedy | 10 October 1967

Director:

William Graham

Producer:

Joseph T. Steck

Cinematographer:

Robert Burks

Editor:

Warren Low

Production Designer:

Fernando Carrère

Production Company:

Geoffrey Productions, Inc.
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HISTORY

Waterhole #3 marked the feature film debuts of director William Graham and co-writer and producer Joseph T. Steck. Actor James Coburn’s involvement was announced in the 10 Jun 1966 DV. Coburn stated in a 28 Aug 1966 NYT interview that he had formed his own production company, Mom’s Old-Fashioned Films, to make the picture with Blake Edwards’s Geoffrey Productions, Inc.
       Principal photography began on 3 Oct 1966, as reported in the Nov 1966 DV. Location shooting took place in Lone Pine, CA; at the Albertson Ranch in Thousand Oaks, CA; and in the Mojave Desert, according to various contemporary sources including the 8 Oct 1966 LAT. In early Nov 1966, heavy rains prompted a move from Albertson Ranch to the Paramount studio lot, as noted in the 8 Nov 1966 DV, which also indicated there were three weeks left of filming.
       Although a 17 Feb 1967 DV item stated that a Jul 1967 release was planned, Waterhole #3 did not open until 10 Oct 1967 in New York City, and the following week in Los Angeles, CA.
       Gene Marum served as the director trainee to assistant director Mickey McCardle, and the following actors were cast, according to DV and LAT items published between Sep and Dec 1966: Bill Borzage; William Ahlbee; Ginny Gan; Ned Harkness; Charlie Wong Ho; and Desiree ... More Less

Waterhole #3 marked the feature film debuts of director William Graham and co-writer and producer Joseph T. Steck. Actor James Coburn’s involvement was announced in the 10 Jun 1966 DV. Coburn stated in a 28 Aug 1966 NYT interview that he had formed his own production company, Mom’s Old-Fashioned Films, to make the picture with Blake Edwards’s Geoffrey Productions, Inc.
       Principal photography began on 3 Oct 1966, as reported in the Nov 1966 DV. Location shooting took place in Lone Pine, CA; at the Albertson Ranch in Thousand Oaks, CA; and in the Mojave Desert, according to various contemporary sources including the 8 Oct 1966 LAT. In early Nov 1966, heavy rains prompted a move from Albertson Ranch to the Paramount studio lot, as noted in the 8 Nov 1966 DV, which also indicated there were three weeks left of filming.
       Although a 17 Feb 1967 DV item stated that a Jul 1967 release was planned, Waterhole #3 did not open until 10 Oct 1967 in New York City, and the following week in Los Angeles, CA.
       Gene Marum served as the director trainee to assistant director Mickey McCardle, and the following actors were cast, according to DV and LAT items published between Sep and Dec 1966: Bill Borzage; William Ahlbee; Ginny Gan; Ned Harkness; Charlie Wong Ho; and Desiree Sumarra. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
10 Jun 1966
p. 2.
Daily Variety
18 Jul 1966
p. 13.
Daily Variety
27 Sep 1966
p. 3.
Daily Variety
28 Oct 1966
p. 8.
Daily Variety
3 Nov 1966
p. 4.
Daily Variety
4 Nov 1966
p. 6.
Daily Variety
4 Nov 1966
p. 8.
Daily Variety
8 Nov 1966
p. 1, 4.
Daily Variety
9 Nov 1966
p. 2.
Daily Variety
10 Nov 1966
p. 4.
Daily Variety
6 Feb 1967
p. 3.
Daily Variety
17 Feb 1967
p. 4.
Los Angeles Times
20 Sep 1966
Section C, p. 10.
Los Angeles Times
8 Oct 1966
p. 22.
Los Angeles Times
1 Dec 1966
Section D, p. 17.
New York Times
28 Aug 1966.
---
New York Times
11 Oct 1967.
---
Variety
4 Oct 1967
p. 16.
Variety
24 Jan 1968
p. 7.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Blake Edwards Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Assoc prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
ART DIRECTOR
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
Cost
MUSIC
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec photog eff
Process photog
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hairstyles
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Sp action seq
STAND INS
Spec action seq
SOURCES
SONGS
"The Code of the West," words and music by Dave Grusin and Robert Wells
sung by Roger Miller.
PERFORMER
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Waterhole Number Three
Release Date:
10 October 1967
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 10 October 1967
Los Angeles opening: 20 October 1967
Production Date:
3 October--late November or early December 1966
Copyright Claimant:
Geoffrey Productions, Inc.
Copyright Date:
10 October 1967
Copyright Number:
LP34993
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Technicolor
Widescreen/ratio
Techniscope
Duration(in mins):
95
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In the late 1880s, Cavalry Sergeant Henry Foggers and three confederates rob the Army of a fortune in gold bullion and then bury it in a waterhole in the desert. A short time later, a professional gambler named Lewton Cole steals a map showing the whereabouts of the gold, kills one of the confederates, and sets out to recover the treasure. Stopping at the small town of Integrity, he locks up Sheriff Copperud and his deputy in their jailhouse, steals a horse, takes a few minutes to seduce Copperud's pretty daughter, Billee, and once more rides off. Indignant over being so casually discarded, Billee screams that she has been raped and joins her father in pursuit of Lewton. Copperud overtakes him just as Lewton retrieves the gold. Although Lewton suggests they divide the bullion, Sergeant Foggers arrives and relieves them both of the treasure. Not to be outdone, Lewton returns to Integrity, where Foggers and his boys are enjoying themselves in the town brothel owned by Lavinia. During the wild gun battle that follows, Lavinia persuades one of Foggers' accomplices, Ben, to bury the gold in an isolated spot outside of town. But Billee also learns of the location and gets there first. Then Lewton appears and repeats his earlier seduction of the susceptible Billee. While she is standing naked behind a rock, he takes the gold and crosses the border into Mexico, leaving all concerned--but most of all Billee--furious and ... +


In the late 1880s, Cavalry Sergeant Henry Foggers and three confederates rob the Army of a fortune in gold bullion and then bury it in a waterhole in the desert. A short time later, a professional gambler named Lewton Cole steals a map showing the whereabouts of the gold, kills one of the confederates, and sets out to recover the treasure. Stopping at the small town of Integrity, he locks up Sheriff Copperud and his deputy in their jailhouse, steals a horse, takes a few minutes to seduce Copperud's pretty daughter, Billee, and once more rides off. Indignant over being so casually discarded, Billee screams that she has been raped and joins her father in pursuit of Lewton. Copperud overtakes him just as Lewton retrieves the gold. Although Lewton suggests they divide the bullion, Sergeant Foggers arrives and relieves them both of the treasure. Not to be outdone, Lewton returns to Integrity, where Foggers and his boys are enjoying themselves in the town brothel owned by Lavinia. During the wild gun battle that follows, Lavinia persuades one of Foggers' accomplices, Ben, to bury the gold in an isolated spot outside of town. But Billee also learns of the location and gets there first. Then Lewton appears and repeats his earlier seduction of the susceptible Billee. While she is standing naked behind a rock, he takes the gold and crosses the border into Mexico, leaving all concerned--but most of all Billee--furious and frustrated. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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