Clambake (1967)

100 mins | Comedy | 8 November 1967

Director:

Arthur H. Nadel

Cinematographer:

William Margulies

Editor:

Tom Rolf

Production Designer:

Lloyd S. Papez

Production Company:

Rhodes Pictures
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HISTORY

On 5 Apr 1966, DV announced that Arthur H. Nadel had been hired as a “floating producer” to work with Arthur Gardner, Jules Levy, and Arnold Laven on several upcoming projects, including the United Artists-Elvis Presley vehicle, Clambake. Early the following year, the 27 Jan 1967 LAT reported that Nadel would also direct.
       Items in the 14 Mar and 31 Mar DV indicated that Edward Binns was temporarily attached in a supporting role, but forced to drop out due to scheduling conflicts.
       After several delays, filming began 13 Mar 1967, according to a DV production chart four days later. Although the story takes place in Miami, FL, the 23 Dec 1966 DV suggested that only second unit work was completed there, as Nadel and Laven prepared local talent for scenes at the annual Orange Bowl Regatta. The 24 Jan 1967 and 26 Apr 1967 editions indicated that principal photography took place in the Los Angeles, CA, area, including Van Nuys and the Universal Studios soundstages. Filming was completed by early summer, when a 2 May 1967 DV brief reported that Presley was scheduled to begin sound looping.
       The “Film Assignments” column of the 13 Mar 1967 DV listed the names of several crewmembers whose involvement could not be confirmed in onscreen credits or other contemporary sources: Charles Dismukes (assistant director); Joe Mazzuca (script supervisor); Sy Hoffberg (camera operator); Bill Brown (assistant cameraman); Bill Carey (stills); Paddy Warfield (grip); Eugene Woods (gaffer); Herman Lipney (best boy); Bob Bone, Oscar Kipust (props); Ray Cossar (recordist); Perry Devore (editor); Lance LeGault (assistant choreographer); Chet ... More Less

On 5 Apr 1966, DV announced that Arthur H. Nadel had been hired as a “floating producer” to work with Arthur Gardner, Jules Levy, and Arnold Laven on several upcoming projects, including the United Artists-Elvis Presley vehicle, Clambake. Early the following year, the 27 Jan 1967 LAT reported that Nadel would also direct.
       Items in the 14 Mar and 31 Mar DV indicated that Edward Binns was temporarily attached in a supporting role, but forced to drop out due to scheduling conflicts.
       After several delays, filming began 13 Mar 1967, according to a DV production chart four days later. Although the story takes place in Miami, FL, the 23 Dec 1966 DV suggested that only second unit work was completed there, as Nadel and Laven prepared local talent for scenes at the annual Orange Bowl Regatta. The 24 Jan 1967 and 26 Apr 1967 editions indicated that principal photography took place in the Los Angeles, CA, area, including Van Nuys and the Universal Studios soundstages. Filming was completed by early summer, when a 2 May 1967 DV brief reported that Presley was scheduled to begin sound looping.
       The “Film Assignments” column of the 13 Mar 1967 DV listed the names of several crewmembers whose involvement could not be confirmed in onscreen credits or other contemporary sources: Charles Dismukes (assistant director); Joe Mazzuca (script supervisor); Sy Hoffberg (camera operator); Bill Brown (assistant cameraman); Bill Carey (stills); Paddy Warfield (grip); Eugene Woods (gaffer); Herman Lipney (best boy); Bob Bone, Oscar Kipust (props); Ray Cossar (recordist); Perry Devore (editor); Lance LeGault (assistant choreographer); Chet Waller (transportation); and Jack Mitchell (craft service).
       According to a local box-office report in the 25 Oct 1967 Var, Clambake opened in late Oct 1967 at the Lyric Theatre in Minneapolis, MN. On 6 Nov 1967, LAT announced that the citywide run would begin two days later. The New York City engagement opened the following month, on 13 Dec 1967.
       One source listed “You Don’t Know Me” as an additional song performed in the film. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
5 Apr 1966
p. 14.
Daily Variety
19 Sep 1966.
---
Daily Variety
23 Dec 1966
p. 4.
Daily Variety
24 Jan 1967
p. 18.
Daily Variety
14 Mar 1967
p. 4.
Daily Variety
10 Mar 1967
p. 13.
Daily Variety
13 Mar 1967
p. 15.
Daily Variety
17 Mar 1967
p. 14.
Daily Variety
31 Mar 1967
p. 2.
Daily Variety
26 Apr 1967
p. 2.
Daily Variety
2 May 1967
p. 2.
Los Angeles Times
10 Sep 1966
p. 19.
Los Angeles Times
27 Jan 1967
Section D, p. 9.
Los Angeles Times
1 Nov 1967
Section D, p. 13.
Los Angeles Times
6 Nov 1967
Section C, p. 27.
New York Times
13 Dec 1967
p. 54.
New York Times
14 Dec 1967.
---
Variety
25 Oct 1967
p. 8.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Levy-Gardner-Laven Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Prod
Assoc prod
WRITER
Story-scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
Ward
MUSIC
Mus comp & cond
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
DANCE
Choreog
MAKEUP
Makeup
Makeup
Hairstyles
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
SOURCES
SONGS
"Clambake," words and music by Sid Wayne and Ben Weisman
"Who Needs Money?" and "The Girl I Never Loved," words and music by Randy Starr
"Confidence" and "A House That Has Everything," words and music by Sid Tepper and Roy C. Bennett
+
SONGS
"Clambake," words and music by Sid Wayne and Ben Weisman
"Who Needs Money?" and "The Girl I Never Loved," words and music by Randy Starr
"Confidence" and "A House That Has Everything," words and music by Sid Tepper and Roy C. Bennett
"Hey Hey Hey," words and music by Joy Byers
all songs sung by Elvis Presley.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
8 November 1967
Premiere Information:
Minneapolis, MN opening: late October 1967
Los Angeles opening: 8 November 1967
New York opening: 13 December 1967
Production Date:
began 13 March 1967
Copyright Claimant:
Rhodes Pictures
Copyright Date:
18 October 1967
Copyright Number:
LP35089
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Technicolor
Widescreen/ratio
Techniscope
Duration(in mins):
100
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Texas oil heir Scott Heyward rejects the offer of a vice presidency in his father's company and sets out to make good on his own. En route to Florida, he switches identities with a young motorcyclist named Tom Wilson and takes the latter's job as a water ski instructor at a Miami hotel. While Tom, posing as Scott, checks into the hotel's presidential suite, Scott starts giving skiing lessons to fortune hunter Dianne Carter, who is out to snare playboy James Jamison III, a competitor in the annual Orange Bowl Power Boat Regatta. Although Scott is eager to impress Dianne by also competing in the event, he refuses to use one of the three boats he owns in Texas. Instead, he sticks to his vow of living only on his hotel earnings by offering to drive a boat designed by Sam Burton. Since Burton's craft went to pieces in the last race because of defective protective coating, Scott sends for an experimental hardener called "Goop," which he himself developed in his father's laboratory. On the eve of the regatta, a clash between Scott and Jamison results in Dianne's admitting that her values were warped and that she is now rooting for Scott to win. He does win, and that evening, as Scott proposes to Dianne, the true identities of Scott and Tom are revealed. Stunned to learn she is actually engaged to a multimillionaire, Dianne faints dead ... +


Texas oil heir Scott Heyward rejects the offer of a vice presidency in his father's company and sets out to make good on his own. En route to Florida, he switches identities with a young motorcyclist named Tom Wilson and takes the latter's job as a water ski instructor at a Miami hotel. While Tom, posing as Scott, checks into the hotel's presidential suite, Scott starts giving skiing lessons to fortune hunter Dianne Carter, who is out to snare playboy James Jamison III, a competitor in the annual Orange Bowl Power Boat Regatta. Although Scott is eager to impress Dianne by also competing in the event, he refuses to use one of the three boats he owns in Texas. Instead, he sticks to his vow of living only on his hotel earnings by offering to drive a boat designed by Sam Burton. Since Burton's craft went to pieces in the last race because of defective protective coating, Scott sends for an experimental hardener called "Goop," which he himself developed in his father's laboratory. On the eve of the regatta, a clash between Scott and Jamison results in Dianne's admitting that her values were warped and that she is now rooting for Scott to win. He does win, and that evening, as Scott proposes to Dianne, the true identities of Scott and Tom are revealed. Stunned to learn she is actually engaged to a multimillionaire, Dianne faints dead away. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.