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The 24 Mar 1961 DV announced Captain Sinbad as the next project for King Brothers Productions. Approximately six months later, preproduction was underway, as stated in the 18 Oct 1961 Var. Location filming was planned for India. The 25 Oct 1961 Var reported that company executives Frank and Maurice King were scouting locations in London, England, Hamburg, Germany, and Bombay (later known as Mumbai), India. On 13 Dec 1961, Var revealed that the $300,000 production would include a chariot race, a battle between two elephants, and an “arena scene” requiring 3,000 background actors. Approximately $30,000 was allocated for special effects. Filming was expected to last nine months. Although the 15 Dec 1961 DV claimed that production would likely take place in Mexico, the 2 Feb 1962 LAT announced the official location as Munich, Germany. The 2 May 1962 Var identified the studio lot as Geiselgasteig. A news item in the 13 Feb 1962 DV stated that cast member Heidi Brühl was detained at Munich Airport for several hours due to a “smallpox scare” in Europe. It was also noted that actor Burr Jerger was assisting with photography and makeup. The picture marked Brühl’s U.S. screen debut. Principal photography began 15 Feb 1962, according to 28 Feb 1962 Var production charts. The 26 Feb 1962 DV noted that the Munich Symphony Orchestra was contracted to record Michel Michelet’s score. The film was referred to by its alternate title, Captain Sindbad.
       In the ... More Less

The 24 Mar 1961 DV announced Captain Sinbad as the next project for King Brothers Productions. Approximately six months later, preproduction was underway, as stated in the 18 Oct 1961 Var. Location filming was planned for India. The 25 Oct 1961 Var reported that company executives Frank and Maurice King were scouting locations in London, England, Hamburg, Germany, and Bombay (later known as Mumbai), India. On 13 Dec 1961, Var revealed that the $300,000 production would include a chariot race, a battle between two elephants, and an “arena scene” requiring 3,000 background actors. Approximately $30,000 was allocated for special effects. Filming was expected to last nine months. Although the 15 Dec 1961 DV claimed that production would likely take place in Mexico, the 2 Feb 1962 LAT announced the official location as Munich, Germany. The 2 May 1962 Var identified the studio lot as Geiselgasteig. A news item in the 13 Feb 1962 DV stated that cast member Heidi Brühl was detained at Munich Airport for several hours due to a “smallpox scare” in Europe. It was also noted that actor Burr Jerger was assisting with photography and makeup. The picture marked Brühl’s U.S. screen debut. Principal photography began 15 Feb 1962, according to 28 Feb 1962 Var production charts. The 26 Feb 1962 DV noted that the Munich Symphony Orchestra was contracted to record Michel Michelet’s score. The film was referred to by its alternate title, Captain Sindbad.
       In the 18 Apr 1962 LAT, columnist Philip K. Scheuer claimed that the special effects would be achieved on set, rather than with “optical work.” Effects included simulations of actors being eaten by alligators and carnivorous plants, and Heidi Brühl “being burned alive and turned into a bird.” Twenty-seven “master sets” were built, and reportedly 30,000 background actors were needed for “spectacle scenes.” The 27 Mar 1962 LAT noted that 14,000 background actors appeared in the “Mardi Gras sequence.” The 13 Mar 1962 DV claimed that the King Brothers fired a lion from their production after it broke free and wandered the studio. According to the 9 May 1962 Var, the completion of photography was expected by 1 Jun 1962. However, the King Brothers intended to reserve space at the studio for another year.
       Casting announcements included Robert Kanter, Jorge Rado, Osman Ragheb, Armin Dahlen (13 Mar 1962 DV), and the Danish Ballet of Copenhagen (28 Feb 1962 DV). Co-star Pedro Armendáriz died of cancer on 18 Jun 1963.
       The 25 Aug 1962 LAT and 17 Apr 1963 Var announced the upcoming world premiere at the Mattaeser Palast in Munich in early 1963. No specific date appeared in either source. The 19 Mar 1963 DV noted that Anna Luise Schubert and John Schapar, the European dance team featured in the picture, planned a promotional tour of the U.S. during the summer months. Distributor Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Pictures (MGM) hosted a preview screening for reporters and exhibitors in Charlotte, NC, as stated in the 1 May 1963 Var. The 6 Mar 1963 DV noted that MGM changed plans to withhold release until Labor Day, choosing instead to debut the picture in Jun 1963. Box office reports in the 26 Jun 1963 Var indicated that the world premiere was held days earlier in Boston, MA. The film opened 26 Jun 1963 in Los Angeles, CA, and approximately one week later in New York City. The 4 Jul 1963 NYT described it as “a broad mishmash of fantasy-comedy” that “slips from mediocrity into a wildly, funny, eerie and casually beguiling adventure” in the last thirty minutes. The 5 Jul 1963 DV reported gross receipts of $1.25 million within the first two weeks.
       While the 24 Jun 1963 DV commended the special effects team, the review made reference to “some jarring transparencies,” prompting a response in the 1 Jul 1963 DV from production supervisor Leon Chooluck. The letter stated that no transparencies or process shots were used during the course of production, identifying the substandard images as a set of glass mattes created in England under the supervision of Tom Howard.
       Although Samuel B. West was given co-credit for the screenplay when the film was initially released, according to official WGA records, West was a pseudonym for writer Ian McLellan Hunter. The WGA changed the screenplay credit to read, "Screenplay by Ian McLellan Hunter and Guy Endore." More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
24 Mar 1961
p. 3.
Daily Variety
15 Dec 1961
p. 13.
Daily Variety
13 Feb 1962
p. 2, 9.
Daily Variety
26 Feb 1962
p. 3.
Daily Variety
28 Feb 1962
p. 5.
Daily Variety
13 Mar 1962
p. 5.
Daily Variety
13 May 1962
p. 2.
Daily Variety
6 Mar 1963
p. 2.
Daily Variety
19 Mar 1963
p. 8.
Daily Variety
24 Jun 1963
p. 3.
Daily Variety
1 Jul 1963
p. 15.
Daily Variety
5 Jul 1963
p. 2.
Los Angeles Times
2 Feb 1962
Section A, p. 13.
Los Angeles Times
27 Mar 1962
Section C, p. 11.
Los Angeles Times
18 Apr 1962
Section C, p. 13.
Los Angeles Times
20 May 1962
Section A, p. 7.
Los Angeles Times
25 Aug 1962
Section A, p. 7.
Los Angeles Times
23 Jun 1963
Section B, p. 7.
Los Angeles Times
29 Jun 1963
Section C, p. 6.
Los Angeles Times
4 Jul 1963
Section D, p. 9.
New York Times
4 Jul 1963
p. 9.
Variety
18 Oct 1961
p. 7.
Variety
25 Oct 1961
p. 7.
Variety
13 Dec 1961
p. 21.
Variety
28 Feb 1962
p. 5.
Variety
2 May 1962
p. 113.
Variety
9 May 1962
p. 3.
Variety
17 Apr 1963
p. 22.
Variety
1 May 1963
p. 4.
Variety
26 Jun 1963
p. 10.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
1st asst dir
PRODUCERS
Prod
WRITERS
Orig story--scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Dir of photog
Cam op
ART DIRECTORS
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Associate ed
Film ed
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dressing
COSTUMES
Supv ward
Ward mistress
Ballet cost des
MUSIC
Mus comp
Symphonic orch cond
SOUND
Sd ed
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec photog eff
DANCE
Choreog
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
PRODUCTION MISC
Asst director--prod supv
Asst to the prod
Scr supv
Animal handler
DETAILS
Series:
Alternate Title:
Captain Sindbad
Release Date:
19 June 1963
Premiere Information:
Boston premiere: 19 June 1963
Los Angeles opening: 26 June 1963
New York opening: early July 1963
Production Date:
15 February--late May 1962
Copyright Claimant:
King Brothers Productions
Copyright Date:
16 May 1963
Copyright Number:
LP26348
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
85
Countries:
Germany, United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In ancient Baristan, Captain Sinbad falls in love with the beautiful Princess Jana, whose father, the king, is under the evil spell of a villainous tyrant, El Kerim. El Kerim has seized control of the kingdom and plans to marry Princess Jana. Upon learning that El Kerim is indestructible because his heart is locked in an ivory tower guarded by multiheaded, fire-breathing monsters, Sinbad and his loyal followers set out to find the tower. After encountering numerous perils (an invisible monster, a nine-headed scylla, an attack upon their ship by giant prehistoric birds), they finally reach the tower. El Kerim has also arrived by magic to protect his heart, but Sinbad slays the tyrant and saves Princess Jana from the death El Kerim had planned for ... +


In ancient Baristan, Captain Sinbad falls in love with the beautiful Princess Jana, whose father, the king, is under the evil spell of a villainous tyrant, El Kerim. El Kerim has seized control of the kingdom and plans to marry Princess Jana. Upon learning that El Kerim is indestructible because his heart is locked in an ivory tower guarded by multiheaded, fire-breathing monsters, Sinbad and his loyal followers set out to find the tower. After encountering numerous perils (an invisible monster, a nine-headed scylla, an attack upon their ship by giant prehistoric birds), they finally reach the tower. El Kerim has also arrived by magic to protect his heart, but Sinbad slays the tyrant and saves Princess Jana from the death El Kerim had planned for her. +

GENRE
Genre:


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.