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HISTORY

The 25 Oct 1964 NYT announced After the Fox as the initial project for Brookfield Films, Ltd., owned by comic actor Peter Sellers and producer John Bryan. First-time screenwriter Neil Simon recommended Italian director Vittorio De Sica to helm the picture. The 7 Apr 1965 DV noted that Simon was collaborating with De Sica and Cesare Zavattini on the screenplay. A nine-week shooting schedule was planned for Rome, Italy, with an additional three weeks in Ischia, Italy. United Artists Corporation (UA) agreed to distribute the film. The 13 May 1965 DV revealed that UA was also affiliated with Tale of the Fox, another production scheduled to shoot in Italy. To avoid confusion between the two pictures, the latter was re-titled The Honey Pot (1967, see entry).
       A news item in the 2 Dec 1964 DV noted that actor Peter Falk might join the cast. The 21 May 1965 LAT revealed that first-time actress Lydia Brazzi, the wife of Rossano Brazzi, would appear as the title character's mother. The character's sister was played by Britt Ekland, Sellers's current wife. According to the 12 Aug 1965 LAT, cast member Akim Tamiroff was required to shuttle between locations in Italy and France during production, as he was in the process of completing his role in Hotel Paradiso (1966, see entry). Principal photography began 24 May 1965, as stated in a 28 May 1965 DV production chart.
       Veteran actor Victor Mature told the 7 Dec 1966 LAT that ... More Less

The 25 Oct 1964 NYT announced After the Fox as the initial project for Brookfield Films, Ltd., owned by comic actor Peter Sellers and producer John Bryan. First-time screenwriter Neil Simon recommended Italian director Vittorio De Sica to helm the picture. The 7 Apr 1965 DV noted that Simon was collaborating with De Sica and Cesare Zavattini on the screenplay. A nine-week shooting schedule was planned for Rome, Italy, with an additional three weeks in Ischia, Italy. United Artists Corporation (UA) agreed to distribute the film. The 13 May 1965 DV revealed that UA was also affiliated with Tale of the Fox, another production scheduled to shoot in Italy. To avoid confusion between the two pictures, the latter was re-titled The Honey Pot (1967, see entry).
       A news item in the 2 Dec 1964 DV noted that actor Peter Falk might join the cast. The 21 May 1965 LAT revealed that first-time actress Lydia Brazzi, the wife of Rossano Brazzi, would appear as the title character's mother. The character's sister was played by Britt Ekland, Sellers's current wife. According to the 12 Aug 1965 LAT, cast member Akim Tamiroff was required to shuttle between locations in Italy and France during production, as he was in the process of completing his role in Hotel Paradiso (1966, see entry). Principal photography began 24 May 1965, as stated in a 28 May 1965 DV production chart.
       Veteran actor Victor Mature told the 7 Dec 1966 LAT that he interrupted his retirement to play aging movie star "Tony Powell" at the invitation of Sellers. Mature claimed that he demonstrated his dissatisfaction with Neil Simon's screenplay by throwing it into the Mediterranean Sea. A reconciliation was reached following a second attempt to dispose of the script and a heated exchange with De Sica. Mature admitted that he patterned his characterization on the director, with elements of filmmaker Cecil B. DeMille, "plus a lot of egotism."
       The 21 Jul 1965 DV reported that Sellers returned to London, England, during a one-week hiatus from filming, during which the crew relocated to Ischia. The actor spent part of his vacation recording a version of the Beatles' "A Hard Day's Night" while parodying the voice of Sir Laurence Olivier. On 29 Nov 1965, LAT announced Mature's return from Italy, indicating the end of production. UA informed the 23 Sep 1965 DV of its goal of scheduling a commercial screening before the end of the year, hoping to qualify the film for Academy Award consideration.
       Three months later, the 28 Feb 1966 DV stated that composer Burt Bacharach was in London recording the score. The 23 Jun 1966 issue anticipated the completion of post-production by the end of the following month.
       An item in the 18 Nov 1966 DV revealed UA's attempt at publicizing the film by releasing a news story about the fictional production, Gold of Cairo, by Italian director "Federico Fabrizi," a character played by Sellers.
       After the Fox opened 16 Dec 1966 in Los Angeles, CA, and 23 Dec 1966 in New York City. Despite mixed reviews, the film earned $2,296,970 in rental fees, according to the 3 Jan 1968 Var.
       The 30 Dec 1966 DV reported that the picture may have inspired a robbery during its run at New York City's Astor Theatre. After an armed thief posing as a "laundryman" robbed the theater of $1,300, manager John Schneiderman admitted that he should have paid more attention to his advertisement, "Guard your gold-The Fox is on the loose."
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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
2 Dec 1964
p. 2.
Daily Variety
7 Apr 1965
p. 2.
Daily Variety
13 May 1965
p. 3.
Daily Variety
28 May 1965
p. 11.
Daily Variety
21 Jul 1965
p. 2.
Daily Variety
23 Sep 1965
p. 2.
Daily Variety
9 Dec 1965
p. 3.
Daily Variety
28 Feb 1966
p. 1.
Daily Variety
23 Jun 1966
p. 4.
Daily Variety
3 Oct 1966
p. 3.
Daily Variety
18 Nov 1966
p. 2.
Daily Variety
27 Dec 1966
p. 3.
Daily Variety
30 Dec 1966
p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
21 May 1965
Section D, p. 15.
Los Angeles Times
11 Jun 1965
Section C, p. 24.
Los Angeles Times
12 Aug 1965
Section D, p. 8.
Los Angeles Times
29 Nov 1965
Section C, p. 25.
Los Angeles Times
29 Nov 1966
Section C, p. 19.
Los Angeles Times
7 Dec 1966
Section D, p. 15.
Los Angeles Times
17 Dec 1966
Section B, p. 6.
New York Times
25 Oct 1964
Section X, p. 7.
New York Times
23 Dec 1966
p. 14.
New York Times
24 Dec 1966
p. 11.
Variety
3 Jan 1968
p. 25.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
2nd unit dir
2nd unit dir
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Prod
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Prod des
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
Cost
SOUND
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hairstyles
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Main titles
SOURCES
SONGS
"After the Fox," music by Burt Bacharach, lyrics by Hal David.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Caccia alla volpe
Release Date:
16 December 1966
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 16 December 1966
New York opening: 23 December 1966
Production Date:
24 May--late November 1965
Copyright Claimant:
Delegate Productions
Copyright Date:
15 December 1966
Copyright Number:
LP40473
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
De Luxe
Widescreen/ratio
Panavision
Duration(in mins):
103
Countries:
United Kingdom, Italy, United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Relaxing in jail for the ninth time in 11 years, Aldo Vanucci, alias "The Fox," remains unmoved by a discussion among fellow inmates Pollo, Carlo, and Siepi about a recent gold bullion robbery in Cairo valued at $3 million. However, when he hears rumors that his younger sister Gina has become a girl of the streets, he switches places with the prison doctor who has come to examine him and once again returns to society. Racing to Rome, he catches Gina trying to pick up a fat, middle-aged man on the street. Enraged, Aldo attacks the man, only to discover that his sister is making a cinéma vérité film. The incident provides Aldo with an inspirational idea for helping archcriminal Okra smuggle the stolen gold bullion into Italy. Posing as "new wave" director Federico Fabrizi, Aldo hijacks some motion picture equipment, hires a fading American matinee idol, Tony Powell, as his star, and sets up for location filming at a small Mediterranean fishing village where the bullion is to be brought in by ship from Cairo. He plans to incorporate the landing of the gold into the plot of his film and obtains the assistance of the local police chief. Everything runs smoothly until Tony's manager, Harry Granoff, tips off the police, and Okra pulls a last-minute double-cross which lands everybody in jail after a long chase involving the police and Interpol. To save Gina, Tony, and the innocent villagers, Aldo confesses, but not before hearing his film acclaimed as "the work of a primitive genius." Aldo is again sent back to prison with a 5-year sentence; but, since he has made a date for the following April, he ... +


Relaxing in jail for the ninth time in 11 years, Aldo Vanucci, alias "The Fox," remains unmoved by a discussion among fellow inmates Pollo, Carlo, and Siepi about a recent gold bullion robbery in Cairo valued at $3 million. However, when he hears rumors that his younger sister Gina has become a girl of the streets, he switches places with the prison doctor who has come to examine him and once again returns to society. Racing to Rome, he catches Gina trying to pick up a fat, middle-aged man on the street. Enraged, Aldo attacks the man, only to discover that his sister is making a cinéma vérité film. The incident provides Aldo with an inspirational idea for helping archcriminal Okra smuggle the stolen gold bullion into Italy. Posing as "new wave" director Federico Fabrizi, Aldo hijacks some motion picture equipment, hires a fading American matinee idol, Tony Powell, as his star, and sets up for location filming at a small Mediterranean fishing village where the bullion is to be brought in by ship from Cairo. He plans to incorporate the landing of the gold into the plot of his film and obtains the assistance of the local police chief. Everything runs smoothly until Tony's manager, Harry Granoff, tips off the police, and Okra pulls a last-minute double-cross which lands everybody in jail after a long chase involving the police and Interpol. To save Gina, Tony, and the innocent villagers, Aldo confesses, but not before hearing his film acclaimed as "the work of a primitive genius." Aldo is again sent back to prison with a 5-year sentence; but, since he has made a date for the following April, he undertakes to escape again. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.