Riot on Sunset Strip (1967)

85 mins | Melodrama | 1 March 1967

Director:

Arthur Dreifuss

Writer:

Orville Hampton

Producer:

Sam Katzman

Cinematographer:

Paul C. Vogel

Editor:

Ben Lewis

Production Designers:

George W. Davis, Merrill Pye

Production Company:

Four Leaf Productions
Full page view
HISTORY

On 9 Dec 1966, DV announced that Sam Katzman’s Four Leaf Productions had begun developing Riot on Sunset Strip about the recent Sunset Strip curfew riots being staged by young people in Hollywood, CA. Principal photography began shortly thereafter under the direction of Arthur Dreifuss, as the 20 Dec 1966 LAT indicated that filming was already in progress.
       Actor Tim Rooney, who portrayed “Grady,” was the son of actor Mickey Rooney. Katzman also reportedly cast Diane King, daughter of actor David Janssen, to make her motion picture debut, but her participation could not be confirmed. According to the 22 Dec 1966 issue of DV, Bill Baldwin, Sr. played the Mayor of Los Angeles.
       The 19 Dec 1966 edition reported that the $500,000 production was completed in Los Angeles, CA, in just twelve days. Pandora’s Box nightclub owner Bill Tilden served as a technical advisor on the picture, which included stock footage of the protests. According to the 21 Dec 1966 DV, the soundtrack featured music by The Standells, The Enemys, The Chocolate Watchband, and Deborah Travis.
       Due to Katzman’s longtime association with Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM), the studio was first reported as his top choice for distributor over other offers from American International Pictures (AIP) and Columbia Pictures. However, on 29 Dec 1966, DV reported that AIP had ultimately won out a bid for worldwide distribution with a 300-print saturation on 1 Mar 1967.
       A 22 Feb 1967 Var item indicated that a trade screening was to be held two days later. Public screenings also began around this time, as an 8 Mar 1967 Var ... More Less

On 9 Dec 1966, DV announced that Sam Katzman’s Four Leaf Productions had begun developing Riot on Sunset Strip about the recent Sunset Strip curfew riots being staged by young people in Hollywood, CA. Principal photography began shortly thereafter under the direction of Arthur Dreifuss, as the 20 Dec 1966 LAT indicated that filming was already in progress.
       Actor Tim Rooney, who portrayed “Grady,” was the son of actor Mickey Rooney. Katzman also reportedly cast Diane King, daughter of actor David Janssen, to make her motion picture debut, but her participation could not be confirmed. According to the 22 Dec 1966 issue of DV, Bill Baldwin, Sr. played the Mayor of Los Angeles.
       The 19 Dec 1966 edition reported that the $500,000 production was completed in Los Angeles, CA, in just twelve days. Pandora’s Box nightclub owner Bill Tilden served as a technical advisor on the picture, which included stock footage of the protests. According to the 21 Dec 1966 DV, the soundtrack featured music by The Standells, The Enemys, The Chocolate Watchband, and Deborah Travis.
       Due to Katzman’s longtime association with Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM), the studio was first reported as his top choice for distributor over other offers from American International Pictures (AIP) and Columbia Pictures. However, on 29 Dec 1966, DV reported that AIP had ultimately won out a bid for worldwide distribution with a 300-print saturation on 1 Mar 1967.
       A 22 Feb 1967 Var item indicated that a trade screening was to be held two days later. Public screenings also began around this time, as an 8 Mar 1967 Var box-office report appeared to confirm the 1 Mar 1967 release with a seven-theater “opener” in Toronto, Canada, while the 29 Mar 1967 Var listed second-week grosses in Portland, OR. The Los Angeles engagement launched 5 Apr 1967, with a New York City release following several months later on 4 Oct 1967. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
9 Dec 1966
p. 11.
Daily Variety
19 Dec 1966
p. 2.
Daily Variety
21 Dec 1966
p. 6.
Daily Variety
22 Dec 1966
p. 4.
Daily Variety
29 Dec 1966
p. 1.
Daily Variety
7 Mar 1967
p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
20 Dec 1966
Section D, p. 16.
Los Angeles Times
2 Apr 1967
Section C, p. 13.
Los Angeles Times
5 Apr 1967
Section C, p. 10.
New York Times
4 Oct 1967
p. 42.
Variety
22 Feb 1967
p. 7.
Variety
8 Mar 1967
p. 12.
Variety
29 Mar 1967
p. 3.
DETAILS
Release Date:
1 March 1967
Premiere Information:
Toronto opening: 1 March 1967
Portland opening: March 1967
Los Angeles opening: 5 April 1967
New York opening: 4 October 1967
Production Date:
began December 1966
Copyright Claimant:
Four Leaf Productions
Copyright Date:
1 March 1967
Copyright Number:
LP34188
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Pathécolor
Duration(in mins):
85
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

As Hollywood's Sunset Strip becomes the favorite hangout for the restless younger generation, many of whom wear hippie garb and carry protest placards, police detective Walt Lorimer is torn between two duties: his obligation to property owners and the right of the young people to lawful assembly. For the past 4 years Lorimer has been separated from his alcoholic wife and his teenage daughter, Andy. When they move back to the city, Andy becomes involved in a brawl on the Strip and is brought to police headquarters for routine identification. Following the incident, Lorimer is told by the wife of a fellow officer that his daughter is headed for trouble and needs guidance. Although Andy at first resolves to stay away from the Strip, her life at home with her drunken mother soon drives her back. Joining her friends at a club, she meets Herby, the son of a movie star. Bored with the "nowhere" action at the club, Herby persuades the group to break into an unoccupied house for a party. And, as the search for kicks continues, drinking leads to marijuana and eventually to LSD. Because Andy refuses to join in, Herby serves her a doctored drink and then coerces her into accompanying him and several others into the bedroom. Ultimately the noise of the brawl arouses the neighbors who call in the police, including Lorimer. When Andy requires hospitalization, the enraged Lorimer violates his own code of nonviolence by seeking out Herby and his friends and all but killing them with his bare fists. With cries of "police brutality" echoing in his ears, Lorimer is forced to somehow cope with what may well be the worst ... +


As Hollywood's Sunset Strip becomes the favorite hangout for the restless younger generation, many of whom wear hippie garb and carry protest placards, police detective Walt Lorimer is torn between two duties: his obligation to property owners and the right of the young people to lawful assembly. For the past 4 years Lorimer has been separated from his alcoholic wife and his teenage daughter, Andy. When they move back to the city, Andy becomes involved in a brawl on the Strip and is brought to police headquarters for routine identification. Following the incident, Lorimer is told by the wife of a fellow officer that his daughter is headed for trouble and needs guidance. Although Andy at first resolves to stay away from the Strip, her life at home with her drunken mother soon drives her back. Joining her friends at a club, she meets Herby, the son of a movie star. Bored with the "nowhere" action at the club, Herby persuades the group to break into an unoccupied house for a party. And, as the search for kicks continues, drinking leads to marijuana and eventually to LSD. Because Andy refuses to join in, Herby serves her a doctored drink and then coerces her into accompanying him and several others into the bedroom. Ultimately the noise of the brawl arouses the neighbors who call in the police, including Lorimer. When Andy requires hospitalization, the enraged Lorimer violates his own code of nonviolence by seeking out Herby and his friends and all but killing them with his bare fists. With cries of "police brutality" echoing in his ears, Lorimer is forced to somehow cope with what may well be the worst riot on Sunset Strip. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.