Parrish (1961)

140 mins | Melodrama | 4 May 1961

Director:

Delmer Daves

Writer:

Delmer Daves

Producer:

Delmer Daves

Cinematographer:

Harry Stradling, Sr.

Editor:

Owen Marks

Production Designer:

Leo Kuter

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures
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HISTORY

According to a 7 May 1958 NYT brief, Warner Bros. Pictures acquired film rights to Mildred Savage’s soon to be published novel, Parrish, for an option fee of $160,000-$200,000. John Patrick was hired to adapt the script, as noted in an 11 Sep 1958 DV item, which named Joshua Logan as producer. The 19 Dec 1958 LAT indicated that Logan would also direct the picture for Mansfield Productions and Warner Bros. At the time, a “nationwide talent search” was underway to fill the role of “Parrish McLean.” On 2 Mar 1959, NYT stated that Natalie Wood would likely co-star after settling a “contract dispute” with Warner Bros. The 13 Feb 1959 DV noted that filmmakers were eyeing Wood’s then husband, Robert Wagner, for a key role, as well as Clark Gable, Laurence Olivier, and Janet Leigh.
       Filming was initially slated to begin in Jun 1959, according to a 4 Feb 1959 Var brief. However, Joshua Logan was replaced by producer-writer-director Delmer Daves, as announced in the 21 Jan 1960 DV, which also stated that Warner Bros. contract actor Troy Donahue had been cast as Parrish McLean. Donahue had previously worked with Delmer Daves on A Summer Place (1959, see entry). In an interview published in the 29 May 1960 LAT, Donahue indicated that Logan had left the project over “some sort of difficulty about the script.”
       The 13 Apr 1960 Var noted that “some foliage and fall exteriors” had already been shot. Location scouting was underway in and around Hartford County, CT, the town of Old Saybrook, ... More Less

According to a 7 May 1958 NYT brief, Warner Bros. Pictures acquired film rights to Mildred Savage’s soon to be published novel, Parrish, for an option fee of $160,000-$200,000. John Patrick was hired to adapt the script, as noted in an 11 Sep 1958 DV item, which named Joshua Logan as producer. The 19 Dec 1958 LAT indicated that Logan would also direct the picture for Mansfield Productions and Warner Bros. At the time, a “nationwide talent search” was underway to fill the role of “Parrish McLean.” On 2 Mar 1959, NYT stated that Natalie Wood would likely co-star after settling a “contract dispute” with Warner Bros. The 13 Feb 1959 DV noted that filmmakers were eyeing Wood’s then husband, Robert Wagner, for a key role, as well as Clark Gable, Laurence Olivier, and Janet Leigh.
       Filming was initially slated to begin in Jun 1959, according to a 4 Feb 1959 Var brief. However, Joshua Logan was replaced by producer-writer-director Delmer Daves, as announced in the 21 Jan 1960 DV, which also stated that Warner Bros. contract actor Troy Donahue had been cast as Parrish McLean. Donahue had previously worked with Delmer Daves on A Summer Place (1959, see entry). In an interview published in the 29 May 1960 LAT, Donahue indicated that Logan had left the project over “some sort of difficulty about the script.”
       The 13 Apr 1960 Var noted that “some foliage and fall exteriors” had already been shot. Location scouting was underway in and around Hartford County, CT, the town of Old Saybrook, CT, and “the mouth of the Connecticut River.” While on location, cast and crew were set to be housed at the Statler Hilton Hotel in Hartford, CT. Interior shooting was scheduled to follow at Warner Bros. studios in Los Angeles, CA. A Writers Guild of America (WGA) strike delayed the start of production, as noted in the 14 Apr 1960 LAT, and principal photography finally began 12 May 1960 on a tobacco farm thirty miles outside Hartford, according to that day’s DV. In a conflicting report, a 13 May 1960 DV production chart stated that shooting was scheduled to begin the following Monday, 16 May 1960. Filming in CT concluded over the weekend of 23 Jul 1960, as reported in the 25 Jul 1960 NYT.
       Martin Eric was listed as a cast member in the 7 Jul 1960 DV.
       The picture cost $1.5 million, according to an article in the 5 Jun 1960 NYT. An otherwise negative review in the 16 Mar 1961 DV suggested the picture had “mild to good boxoffice prospects” due to its young, attractive cast and coming-of-age themes.
       Parrish marked Claudette Colbert’s final appearance in a theatrical motion picture. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
11 Sep 1958
p. 3.
Daily Variety
13 Feb 1959
p. 2.
Daily Variety
21 Jan 1960
p. 14.
Daily Variety
12 May 1960
p. 15.
Daily Variety
13 May 1960
p. 7.
Daily Variety
7 Jul 1960.
---
Daily Variety
16 Mar 1961
p. 3, 18.
Los Angeles Times
19 Dec 1958
Section B, p. 8.
Los Angeles Times
14 Apr 1960
p. 27.
Los Angeles Times
29 May 1960
p. 13.
New York Times
7 May 1958
p. 42.
New York Times
2 Mar 1959
p. 32.
New York Times
5 Jun 1960.
---
New York Times
25 Jul 1960
p. 20.
New York Times
5 May 1961
p. 22.
Variety
4 Feb 1959
p. 20.
Variety
13 Apr 1960
p. 4.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
MUSIC
SOUND
MAKEUP
Makeup
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Parrish by Mildred Savage (New York, 1958).
DETAILS
Release Date:
4 May 1961
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 4 May 1961
Production Date:
began 12 or 16 May 1960
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Bros. Pictures
Copyright Date:
1 July 1960
Copyright Number:
LP25363
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
140
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Widow Ellen McLean and her son, Parrish, arrive at widower Sala Post's Connecticut tobacco farm, where Ellen has taken a position as chaperon to Sala's willful daughter, Alison. Sala, however, resents the handsome young man's presence about the house, and Parrish strikes out on his own as a laborer in the tobacco fields. Almost immediately he has an affair with a farm girl, Lucy, and a short time later he becomes romantically involved with young Alison. When his mother marries unscrupulous tobacco tycoon Judd Raike, Parrish goes to work for his stepfather. The ruthless competitive tactics used by Judd and his two sons, Edgar and Wiley, repulse Parrish, and he quits his job and joins the navy. Offended, Alison promptly marries Wiley. Meanwhile, Lucy has become pregnant by Edgar. Two years later, Parrish returns and leases land from Sala, who has given up trying to fight Judd. Parrish is unable to hire fieldhands, who are terrified lest there be reprisals by the Raikes, but he gets unexpected support from young Paige Raike, Judd's daughter, who enlists her schoolmates to work weekends in the fields. The final showdown occurs when Edgar tries to set fire to Parrish's fields. As Parrish beats his opponent into abject submission before the watching fieldhands, Judd stands by without raising a hand to protect his son, silently acknowledging that Parrish has won his fight--and ... +


Widow Ellen McLean and her son, Parrish, arrive at widower Sala Post's Connecticut tobacco farm, where Ellen has taken a position as chaperon to Sala's willful daughter, Alison. Sala, however, resents the handsome young man's presence about the house, and Parrish strikes out on his own as a laborer in the tobacco fields. Almost immediately he has an affair with a farm girl, Lucy, and a short time later he becomes romantically involved with young Alison. When his mother marries unscrupulous tobacco tycoon Judd Raike, Parrish goes to work for his stepfather. The ruthless competitive tactics used by Judd and his two sons, Edgar and Wiley, repulse Parrish, and he quits his job and joins the navy. Offended, Alison promptly marries Wiley. Meanwhile, Lucy has become pregnant by Edgar. Two years later, Parrish returns and leases land from Sala, who has given up trying to fight Judd. Parrish is unable to hire fieldhands, who are terrified lest there be reprisals by the Raikes, but he gets unexpected support from young Paige Raike, Judd's daughter, who enlists her schoolmates to work weekends in the fields. The final showdown occurs when Edgar tries to set fire to Parrish's fields. As Parrish beats his opponent into abject submission before the watching fieldhands, Judd stands by without raising a hand to protect his son, silently acknowledging that Parrish has won his fight--and Paige. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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