Hail, Hero! (1969)

97 mins | Drama | 1969

Director:

David Miller

Writer:

David Manber

Producer:

Harold D. Cohen

Cinematographer:

Robert Hauser

Production Designer:

Albert Heschong

Production Companies:

Halcyon Productions, Cinema Center Films
Full page view
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
MUSIC
SOUND
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hairstyles
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Scr supv
Prop master
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Hail, Hero! by John Weston (New York, 1968).
AUTHOR
SONGS
Written and sung by Gordon Lightfoot.
PERFORMER
COMPOSER
DETAILS
Premiere Information:
Boston opening: 7 October 1969
Copyright Claimant:
Halcyon Productions
Copyright Date:
26 September 1969
Copyright Number:
LP38735
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
97
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Carl Dixon, a college student, drops out and enlists in the United States Army, even though he has been arrested in the past for failing to register for the draft and again for protesting against the war. In an attempt to understand himself, Carl goes home to his family's ranch in Arizona, but his efforts to inform his parents of his decision are thwarted by the preoccupation of his mother, Santha, with his older brother Frank's upcoming birthday party. Frank is crippled as a result of a childhood accident for which Albert, their father, blames Carl. In addition, Albert has never been able to understand the younger son's pacifist leanings and is disconcerted by Carl's shoulder-length hair. Frank's injury has prevented him from carrying on the Dixon family tradition of wartime heroism, but he is reconciled with Carl when the latter presents him with the mummified corpse of an Indian baby--in effect, telling Frank that the inability to fight is no great matter of concern. The symbolism of the gift is lost on Albert, however, who is already perplexed at Carl's disclosure that he has enlisted so that he may love his enemy firsthand. Meanwhile, Carl discovers that his mother has been having an affair with Mr. Conklin, owner of the local old folks' home. After a long talk with Conklin, Carl makes one final gesture before going off to Vietnam: he paints a psychedelic, peace mural on the family barn. [A prerelease version of the film ends with the family reconciled and painting the barn ... +


Carl Dixon, a college student, drops out and enlists in the United States Army, even though he has been arrested in the past for failing to register for the draft and again for protesting against the war. In an attempt to understand himself, Carl goes home to his family's ranch in Arizona, but his efforts to inform his parents of his decision are thwarted by the preoccupation of his mother, Santha, with his older brother Frank's upcoming birthday party. Frank is crippled as a result of a childhood accident for which Albert, their father, blames Carl. In addition, Albert has never been able to understand the younger son's pacifist leanings and is disconcerted by Carl's shoulder-length hair. Frank's injury has prevented him from carrying on the Dixon family tradition of wartime heroism, but he is reconciled with Carl when the latter presents him with the mummified corpse of an Indian baby--in effect, telling Frank that the inability to fight is no great matter of concern. The symbolism of the gift is lost on Albert, however, who is already perplexed at Carl's disclosure that he has enlisted so that he may love his enemy firsthand. Meanwhile, Carl discovers that his mother has been having an affair with Mr. Conklin, owner of the local old folks' home. After a long talk with Conklin, Carl makes one final gesture before going off to Vietnam: he paints a psychedelic, peace mural on the family barn. [A prerelease version of the film ends with the family reconciled and painting the barn together.] +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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