The Ugly American (1963)

120 mins | Drama | 1963

Director:

George Englund

Writer:

Stewart Stern

Producer:

George Englund

Cinematographer:

Clifford Stine

Editor:

Ted J. Kent

Production Designers:

Alexander Golitzen, Alfred Sweeney

Production Company:

Universal Pictures
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HISTORY

Location scenes filmed in ... More Less

Location scenes filmed in Thailand. More Less

CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Asst dir
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
In charge of prod
WRITER
Story & scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
MUSIC
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hairstyles
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Scr supv
Tech adv
Tech adv
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel The Ugly American by William J. Lederer, Eugene Burdick (New York, 1958).
DETAILS
Release Date:
1963
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: ca2 April 1963
Copyright Claimant:
Universal Pictures
Copyright Date:
5 May 1963
Copyright Number:
LP32702
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Eastman Color by Pathé
Duration(in mins):
120
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Harrison Carter MacWhite is appointed ambassador to the new nation of Sarkhan in Southeast Asia, despite objections from several members of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. A former newsman, MacWhite is a longtime friend of Deong, revolutionary leader of the government opposition who led the struggle for his country's independence. MacWhite and his wife, Marion, arrive in Sarkhan and fight off a rioting crowd which greets them at the airport. MacWhite contacts Deong and tries to persuade him to end his opposition to Freedom Road, a U. S.-built highway which the rebel leader considers to be an example of Western imperialism. Deong refuses, mouthing propaganda, and MacWhite brands him a Communist and terminates their relationship. He then ignores the advice of Homer Atkins, supervising engineer of the road project, by suggesting to Prime Minister Kwen Sai that they shift the path of the road northward, thereby driving a wedge into the heart of the Communist stronghold. In return, MacWhite assures Kwen Sai of U. S. military support should there be intervention by foreign Communist troops. Deong learns of the plan, aligns himself with the local Communists, and leads a revolt. He succeeds in forcing Kwen Sai to admit defeat, but he is betrayed by the Communists when they bring in outside troops, take over the northern part of the country, and then assassinate him. Before dying, he urges his followers to form a coalition with Kwen Sai and the local government. Realizing that despite his good intentions he has bungled his assignment, MacWhite resigns from his post. He explains in an interview with the press that to help the countries of Southeast Asia, Americans must understand their internal problems ... +


Harrison Carter MacWhite is appointed ambassador to the new nation of Sarkhan in Southeast Asia, despite objections from several members of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. A former newsman, MacWhite is a longtime friend of Deong, revolutionary leader of the government opposition who led the struggle for his country's independence. MacWhite and his wife, Marion, arrive in Sarkhan and fight off a rioting crowd which greets them at the airport. MacWhite contacts Deong and tries to persuade him to end his opposition to Freedom Road, a U. S.-built highway which the rebel leader considers to be an example of Western imperialism. Deong refuses, mouthing propaganda, and MacWhite brands him a Communist and terminates their relationship. He then ignores the advice of Homer Atkins, supervising engineer of the road project, by suggesting to Prime Minister Kwen Sai that they shift the path of the road northward, thereby driving a wedge into the heart of the Communist stronghold. In return, MacWhite assures Kwen Sai of U. S. military support should there be intervention by foreign Communist troops. Deong learns of the plan, aligns himself with the local Communists, and leads a revolt. He succeeds in forcing Kwen Sai to admit defeat, but he is betrayed by the Communists when they bring in outside troops, take over the northern part of the country, and then assassinate him. Before dying, he urges his followers to form a coalition with Kwen Sai and the local government. Realizing that despite his good intentions he has bungled his assignment, MacWhite resigns from his post. He explains in an interview with the press that to help the countries of Southeast Asia, Americans must understand their internal problems before inflicting a way of life upon them. As his words are carried to the United States by television, an uninterested viewer switches off his set. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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