Up from the Beach (1965)

98 mins | Drama | 1965

Director:

Robert Parrish

Producer:

Christian Ferry

Cinematographer:

Walter Wottitz

Production Designer:

Willy Holt

Production Company:

Panoramic Productions
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HISTORY

Filmed in Normandy. Screen credits list Clewes as scriptwriter with Mann credited for additional dialogue. The working title of this film is The Day After ... More Less

Filmed in Normandy. Screen credits list Clewes as scriptwriter with Mann credited for additional dialogue. The working title of this film is The Day After . More Less

CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Scr (see note)
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATOR
MUSIC
Mus comp & cond
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Prod mgr
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Epitaph for an Enemy by George Barr (New York, 1959).
AUTHOR
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Day After
Release Date:
1965
Premiere Information:
Detroit opening: 2 June 1965
Copyright Claimant:
Panoramic Productions
Copyright Date:
23 June 1965
Copyright Number:
LP31263
Physical Properties:
Sound
Westrex
Black and White
Widescreen/ratio
CinemaScope
Duration(in mins):
98
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

On the day after D-Day, Sgt. Edward Baxter and a U. S. Army squadron overtake a group of German soldiers who are holding hostage French civilians in a Normandy farmhouse at Verville. The American soldiers kill all but the German town commandant and free the French villagers--among them, Lili, a resistance worker in love with the commandant, who has treated the townspeople with kindness and consideration during the occupation. Upon receiving orders from a U. S. artillery colonel, Sergeant Baxter rounds up the villagers and marches them to the beach for evacuation to England. When they reach the beach, the U. S. Navy and the British beachmaster refuse to accept responsibility for the group, and the tired townspeople return to their homes. They attempt the trip from the village to the beach twice again, but no evacuation occurs. German troops fire on Verville, and the German commandant suggests that the villagers take refuge in the vault of an old church. While inspecting the vault, the commandant steps into a booby trap and dies. The bombardment ends, and the liberated townspeople sing the Marseillaise to Baxter and his troops as they join an American column on its way to the ... +


On the day after D-Day, Sgt. Edward Baxter and a U. S. Army squadron overtake a group of German soldiers who are holding hostage French civilians in a Normandy farmhouse at Verville. The American soldiers kill all but the German town commandant and free the French villagers--among them, Lili, a resistance worker in love with the commandant, who has treated the townspeople with kindness and consideration during the occupation. Upon receiving orders from a U. S. artillery colonel, Sergeant Baxter rounds up the villagers and marches them to the beach for evacuation to England. When they reach the beach, the U. S. Navy and the British beachmaster refuse to accept responsibility for the group, and the tired townspeople return to their homes. They attempt the trip from the village to the beach twice again, but no evacuation occurs. German troops fire on Verville, and the German commandant suggests that the villagers take refuge in the vault of an old church. While inspecting the vault, the commandant steps into a booby trap and dies. The bombardment ends, and the liberated townspeople sing the Marseillaise to Baxter and his troops as they join an American column on its way to the front. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.