The Split (1968)

90 mins | Melodrama | 1968

Director:

Gordon Flemyng

Writer:

Robert Sabaroff

Cinematographer:

Burnett Guffey

Editor:

Rita Roland

Production Designers:

George W. Davis, Urie McCleary

Production Company:

Spectrum Productions
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HISTORY

Location scenes filmed in Los Angeles and San Pedro, ... More Less

Location scenes filmed in Los Angeles and San Pedro, CA. More Less

CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
MUSIC
SOUND
Rec supv
MAKEUP
Hairstyles
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit prod mgr
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel The Seventh by Richard Stark (New York, 1966).
AUTHOR
SONGS
"The Split," words and music by Quincy Jones and Ernie Shelby, sung by Billy Preston
"A Good Woman's Love," words and music by Quincy Jones and Sheb Wooley, sung by Sheb Wooley
"It's Just a Game Love," words and music by Quincy Jones and Ernie Shelby, sung by Arthur Prysock, Clydie King and Billy Preston.
DETAILS
Premiere Information:
Chicago opening: 8 October 1968
Copyright Claimant:
Spectrum Productions
Copyright Date:
30 August 1968
Copyright Number:
LP36034
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Metrocolor
Widescreen/ratio
Panavision
Duration(in mins):
90
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

McClain, an accomplished thief, returns to California after several years' absence and joins an old friend, Gladys, in masterminding a plan for robbing half a million dollars in receipts from the Los Angeles Coliseum while a sell-out football game is in progress. In organizing his gang, McClain subjects possible candidates to a brutal initiation test and comes up with four suitable recruits: gym instructor Bert Clinger, driver Harry Kifka, safecracker Marty Gough, and professional killer Dave Negli. Following weeks of careful preparation, the heist goes as scheduled and the money is hidden in the apartment of McClain's ex-wife, Ellie, who has consented to keep it on the condition that this be McClain's last job. But the next morning, while McClain is out, Ellie's psychotic landlord, Herb Sutro, attempts to assault her and actually kills her, then makes off with the money. A crooked police lieutenant, Walter Brill, investigates the murder and connects it with the stadium robbery; McClain is tortured by the other gang members and accused of stealing the money himself; and in the violent argument that follows, both Gladys and Kifka are killed, though McClain escapes. When Sutro is shot by Detective Brill while resisting arrest, McClain realizes that Brill now has the money and offers to share it with him if he will help eliminate the remaining gang members. Though Brill accepts the proposal and assists McClain in killing his former accomplices, the detective plans to turn a portion of his share over to the authorities and earn a promotion while making it appear that McClain has made off with the rest of the money. As McClain prepares to board a plane for Mexico, however, he ... +


McClain, an accomplished thief, returns to California after several years' absence and joins an old friend, Gladys, in masterminding a plan for robbing half a million dollars in receipts from the Los Angeles Coliseum while a sell-out football game is in progress. In organizing his gang, McClain subjects possible candidates to a brutal initiation test and comes up with four suitable recruits: gym instructor Bert Clinger, driver Harry Kifka, safecracker Marty Gough, and professional killer Dave Negli. Following weeks of careful preparation, the heist goes as scheduled and the money is hidden in the apartment of McClain's ex-wife, Ellie, who has consented to keep it on the condition that this be McClain's last job. But the next morning, while McClain is out, Ellie's psychotic landlord, Herb Sutro, attempts to assault her and actually kills her, then makes off with the money. A crooked police lieutenant, Walter Brill, investigates the murder and connects it with the stadium robbery; McClain is tortured by the other gang members and accused of stealing the money himself; and in the violent argument that follows, both Gladys and Kifka are killed, though McClain escapes. When Sutro is shot by Detective Brill while resisting arrest, McClain realizes that Brill now has the money and offers to share it with him if he will help eliminate the remaining gang members. Though Brill accepts the proposal and assists McClain in killing his former accomplices, the detective plans to turn a portion of his share over to the authorities and earn a promotion while making it appear that McClain has made off with the rest of the money. As McClain prepares to board a plane for Mexico, however, he recalls his promise to Ellie. Troubled, he must decide whether to escape with the money or turn himself over to the police. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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