Boeing Boeing (1965)

102 mins | Romantic comedy | 22 December 1965

Director:

John Rich

Writer:

Edward Anhalt

Producer:

Hal B. Wallis

Cinematographer:

Lucien Ballard

Production Designers:

Hal Pereira, Walter Tyler

Production Company:

Hal Wallis Productions
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HISTORY

Contemporary sources alternately referred to the picture as Boeing Boeing; Boeing, Boeing; and Boeing-Boeing. The latter reflected the title of the source material, a stage play by French playwright Marc Camoletti. The show premiered in Paris, France, on 14 Dec 1960, and enjoyed a lengthy run at the Apollo Theatre in London, England, before opening at Broadway’s Cort Theater on 2 Feb 1965.
       Nearly a year after its Parisian debut, a 16 Oct 1961 DV article included a film adaptation of Boeing-Boeing among the many upcoming projects in development at Paramount Pictures. According to a 14 Aug 1963 Var brief, Artur Brauner was also interested in pursuing the rights, but stated that Camoletti asked for “too much money.” With the property on Paramount’s slate, the 17 Oct 1962 Var reported that producer Hal B. Wallis planned to cast Shirley MacLaine and Dean Martin in the leading roles. The following spring, an 8 May 1963 DV item mentioned that the vehicle was being prepared for Wallis’s Becket (1964, see entry) star Peter O’Toole, but a 29 Jul 1963 brief later that summer indicated Martin was still in the cast.
       Subsequent casting announcements made no further mention of MacLaine’s involvement, and on 21 Dec 1963, LAT announced that Janet Leigh had agreed to star as one of the three airline hostesses. The 5 Jan 1964 NYT noted that the film would reunite Leigh with Wallis and director John Rich, who previously worked together on Wives and Lovers (1963, see entry). According to the 23 ... More Less

Contemporary sources alternately referred to the picture as Boeing Boeing; Boeing, Boeing; and Boeing-Boeing. The latter reflected the title of the source material, a stage play by French playwright Marc Camoletti. The show premiered in Paris, France, on 14 Dec 1960, and enjoyed a lengthy run at the Apollo Theatre in London, England, before opening at Broadway’s Cort Theater on 2 Feb 1965.
       Nearly a year after its Parisian debut, a 16 Oct 1961 DV article included a film adaptation of Boeing-Boeing among the many upcoming projects in development at Paramount Pictures. According to a 14 Aug 1963 Var brief, Artur Brauner was also interested in pursuing the rights, but stated that Camoletti asked for “too much money.” With the property on Paramount’s slate, the 17 Oct 1962 Var reported that producer Hal B. Wallis planned to cast Shirley MacLaine and Dean Martin in the leading roles. The following spring, an 8 May 1963 DV item mentioned that the vehicle was being prepared for Wallis’s Becket (1964, see entry) star Peter O’Toole, but a 29 Jul 1963 brief later that summer indicated Martin was still in the cast.
       Subsequent casting announcements made no further mention of MacLaine’s involvement, and on 21 Dec 1963, LAT announced that Janet Leigh had agreed to star as one of the three airline hostesses. The 5 Jan 1964 NYT noted that the film would reunite Leigh with Wallis and director John Rich, who previously worked together on Wives and Lovers (1963, see entry). According to the 23 Jun 1964 DV, Rich exited his role as co-producer of Gilligan’s Island (CBS, 26 Sep 1964—17 Apr 1967) to fulfill his theatrical film pact with Wallis. Items in the 17 Apr 1964 DV and 10 May 1964 LAT stated that Catherine Spaak and Senta Berger were also in consideration to portray two of the stewardesses.
       Just a few weeks later, however, the 1 Jun 1964 DV claimed that principal roles were offered to Italian actors Marcello Mastroianni and Anna Magnani, although the 23 Jun 1964 edition suggested that Mastroianni would play co-lead to Tony Curtis. By the end of the year, the 9 Nov 1964 DV named Vittorio Gassman as a new possible co-star, but the role of “Robert Reed” eventually went to comedian Jerry Lewis. According to the 20 Jan 1965 DV, Curtis and Lewis were contracted to share top billing in all prints and advertising materials, and although both stars agreed to the arrangement, the 10 Sep 1965 DV pointed out that no matter how the credits were laid out, one name would still take precedence over the other. Wallace solved the problem by suggesting the names be designed to resemble a “decelerating jet rotor…in a circular form which never stops rotating, thus never favoring either.”
       With Curtis and Lewis secured as the leads, casting continued for the three supporting actresses as production got underway. Earlier reports suggested that several European locales were considered for filming, including England and Rome, Italy. However, a 3 Mar 1965 DV brief revealed that production had been abruptly moved from Rome to Paris due to an increase in Italy’s overcharge tax. Principal photography began 9 Apr 1965, according to a DV production chart published on 23 Apr 1965. Three cameramen were reportedly injured when a vehicle carrying equipment capsized at the Place de la Concorde in Paris. The 28 Apr 1965 Var stated that the crewmembers were replaced, and filming proceeded as scheduled. A 27 Apr 1965 DV item indicated that the unit spent ten days on location in Paris before resuming work that day at the Paramount studios in Hollywood, CA.
       Another item in the same publication alleged that Curtis provided many of his own belongings and paintings from his personal collection to decorate his character’s apartment set. The 17 Apr 1965 LAT revealed that men’s designer Sy Devore dressed the male actors in the picture.
       The 24 May 1965 and 15 Jun 1965 DV also included Ted Roter and Julie Parrish among the cast.
       The 14 Jul 1965 Var indicated that production had been completed, and a 7 Jul 1965 Var article listed the total negative cost as $2.2 million.
       Boeing Boeing opened 22 Dec 1965 in several Los Angeles, CA-area theaters, and the following day at the Forum and Guild Theatres in New York City. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
16 Oct 1961
p. 4.
Daily Variety
8 May 1963
p. 4.
Daily Variety
29 Jul 1963
p. 2.
Daily Variety
17 Apr 1964
p. 2.
Daily Variety
1 Jun 1964
p. 2.
Daily Variety
23 Jun 1964
p. 1.
Daily Variety
23 Jun 1964
p. 2.
Daily Variety
9 Nov 1964
p. 2.
Daily Variety
5 Jan 1965
p. 2.
Daily Variety
20 Jan 1965
p. 2.
Daily Variety
21 Jan 1965
p. 2.
Daily Variety
3 Mar 1965
p. 2.
Daily Variety
23 Apr 1965
p. 8.
Daily Variety
27 Apr 1965
p. 2.
Daily Variety
27 Apr 1965
p. 8.
Daily Variety
24 May 1965
p. 11.
Daily Variety
15 Jun 1965
p. 11.
Daily Variety
10 Sep 1965
p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
21 Dec 1963
Section B, p. 6.
Los Angeles Times
10 May 1964
Section T, p. 7.
Los Angeles Times
17 Apr 1965
Section B, p. 7.
Los Angeles Times
22 Dec 1965
Section E, p. 10.
Los Angeles Times
24 Dec 1965
Section A, p. 10.
New York Times
3 Jan 1961
p. 35.
New York Times
18 Mar 1962
p. 119.
New York Times
5 Jan 1964
Section X, p. 7.
New York Times
18 Dec 1964
p. 29.
New York Times
19 Dec 1965
Section X, p. 13.
New York Times
24 Dec 1965
p. 24.
Variety
17 Oct 1962
p. 61.
Variety
14 Aug 1963
p. 22.
Variety
28 Apr 1965
p. 25.
Variety
7 Jul 1965
p. 1.
Variety
14 Jul 1965
p. 4.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dir
Asst dir
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Cam op
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
Cost des
MUSIC
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec photog eff
MAKEUP
Makeup supv
Makeup
Hairstyle supv
PRODUCTION MISC
Asst to the prod
Unit prod mgr
Scr supv
Gaffer
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play Boeing-Boeing by Marc Camoletti (Paris, 14 Dec 1960).
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Boeing-Boeing
Boeing, Boeing
Release Date:
22 December 1965
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 22 December 1965
New York opening: 23 December 1965
Production Date:
9 April--June 1965
Copyright Claimant:
Hal Wallis Productions
Copyright Date:
17 December 1965
Copyright Number:
LP32165
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
102
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Bernard Lawrence, an American correspondent stationed in Paris, has tricked each of three women into believing she is his fiancée. They are British Vicky Hawkins, German Lise Bruner, and French Jacqueline Grieux. Each of them, stewardesses for their respective national airlines, has a different schedule, enabling Bernard to share his apartment with them one at a time. Bertha, the housekeeper, arranges the apartment into different styles of furniture and food for each of the women. This arrangement is disturbed when the airlines switch to the new powerful jets, enabling the women to spend more time in Paris. Robert Reed, Bernard's friend, arrives in Paris without a hotel room and stays in Bernard's apartment. Robert soon realizes Bernard's trouble and forces him to let him move into the apartment. Both men attempt to keep the women from discovering the arrangement, but after a series of incidents, they give up and flee in a taxi from the angry women. They discover that the driver, a pretty young woman, has two roommates who also drive the taxi on the other two shifts. Bernard begins to make plans for a new ... +


Bernard Lawrence, an American correspondent stationed in Paris, has tricked each of three women into believing she is his fiancée. They are British Vicky Hawkins, German Lise Bruner, and French Jacqueline Grieux. Each of them, stewardesses for their respective national airlines, has a different schedule, enabling Bernard to share his apartment with them one at a time. Bertha, the housekeeper, arranges the apartment into different styles of furniture and food for each of the women. This arrangement is disturbed when the airlines switch to the new powerful jets, enabling the women to spend more time in Paris. Robert Reed, Bernard's friend, arrives in Paris without a hotel room and stays in Bernard's apartment. Robert soon realizes Bernard's trouble and forces him to let him move into the apartment. Both men attempt to keep the women from discovering the arrangement, but after a series of incidents, they give up and flee in a taxi from the angry women. They discover that the driver, a pretty young woman, has two roommates who also drive the taxi on the other two shifts. Bernard begins to make plans for a new arrangement. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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