Fate Is the Hunter (1964)

106 mins | Melodrama, Mystery | 1964

Director:

Ralph Nelson

Writer:

Harold Medford

Producer:

Aaron Rosenberg

Cinematographer:

Milton Krasner

Editor:

Robert Simpson

Production Designers:

Jack Martin Smith, Hilyard Brown

Production Company:

Arcola Pictures Corp.
Full page view
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
An Aaron Rosenberg Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Addl photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
Cost des
MUSIC
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec photog eff
Spec photog eff
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hairstyles
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Fate Is the Hunter by Ernest K. Gann (New York, 1961).
SONGS
"No Love No Nothin'," words and music by Harry Warren and Leo Robin
sung by Jane Russell
"Fate Is the Hunter," words and music by Jerry Goldsmith and Don Wolf.
PERFORMER
DETAILS
Premiere Information:
Boston opening: 30 September 1964
Copyright Claimant:
Arcola Pictures
Copyright Date:
30 September 1964
Copyright Number:
LP28964
Physical Properties:
Sound
Westrex
Black and White
Widescreen/ratio
CinemaScope
Duration(in mins):
106
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Continental Airlines flight 22, piloted by Capt. Jack Savage, crashes after departing Los Angeles, killing all 53 passengers and crew members except stewardess Martha Webster. Sam McBane, the airline's director of flight operations, begins an investigation of the disaster. He learns that Savage radioed shortly after takeoff that his right engine was on fire and requested permission to land. He was told to maintain altitude on his left engine until a flight path could be cleared, but the plane crashed. McBane is baffled because the left engine's thrust should have been enough to maintain altitude. He learns from Martha, who had been in the cabin serving coffee, that soon after the right engine caught fire, a signal flashed indicating that the left engine was also aflame. Savage switched off that engine, too, and tried to land on a secluded beach but was unable to avoid crashing into an old pier. Inspecting the wreckage, McBane discovers that the left engine never caught fire, and he wonders about Martha's story. Rumors are spread that Savage was drunk before taking off, but McBane, who had served with Savage during the war, doubts this and investigates further. Sally Fraser, Savage's beneficiary in his will, insists the crash was just fate. McBane decides to reenact the fatal flight in the same kind of plane and with Martha aboard. When he cuts off the right engine, the plane lurches, causing Martha to spill the coffee she is serving. Shortly afterward, the warning light flashes, indicating that the left engine is aflame. McBane has the panel on which the coffee spilled pried up and discovers that the liquid had shorted the wires that controlled the fire ... +


Continental Airlines flight 22, piloted by Capt. Jack Savage, crashes after departing Los Angeles, killing all 53 passengers and crew members except stewardess Martha Webster. Sam McBane, the airline's director of flight operations, begins an investigation of the disaster. He learns that Savage radioed shortly after takeoff that his right engine was on fire and requested permission to land. He was told to maintain altitude on his left engine until a flight path could be cleared, but the plane crashed. McBane is baffled because the left engine's thrust should have been enough to maintain altitude. He learns from Martha, who had been in the cabin serving coffee, that soon after the right engine caught fire, a signal flashed indicating that the left engine was also aflame. Savage switched off that engine, too, and tried to land on a secluded beach but was unable to avoid crashing into an old pier. Inspecting the wreckage, McBane discovers that the left engine never caught fire, and he wonders about Martha's story. Rumors are spread that Savage was drunk before taking off, but McBane, who had served with Savage during the war, doubts this and investigates further. Sally Fraser, Savage's beneficiary in his will, insists the crash was just fate. McBane decides to reenact the fatal flight in the same kind of plane and with Martha aboard. When he cuts off the right engine, the plane lurches, causing Martha to spill the coffee she is serving. Shortly afterward, the warning light flashes, indicating that the left engine is aflame. McBane has the panel on which the coffee spilled pried up and discovers that the liquid had shorted the wires that controlled the fire signal, causing it to flash. Savage is vindicated. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.