Days of Wine and Roses (1962)

117 mins | Drama | 25 December 1962

Director:

Blake Edwards

Writer:

J. P. Miller

Producer:

Martin Manulis

Cinematographer:

Philip H. Lathrop

Production Designer:

Joseph C. Wright

Production Companies:

Martin Manulis, Jalem Productions, Inc.
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HISTORY

The title was derived from the poem, “Vitae Summa Brevis” by Ernest Dowson: “They are not long, the days of wine an roses, out of a misty dream our path emerges for a while, then closes within the dream.”
       The 28 Jan 1960 NYT reported that producer Martin Manulis was returning to Broadway after heading an independent film production company affiliated with Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation. His first project would be a stage version of the J. P. Miller teleplay, Days of Wine and Roses, which originally aired on Playhouse 90 (CBS, 4 Oct 1956—18 May 1960) in 1958. John Frankenheimer, who directed the teleplay, would also helm its stage counterpart. One year later, the 28 Jan 1961 NYT stated that Manulis chose instead to adapt the story as his first motion picture, with Blake Edwards as director, and a cast headed by Jack Lemmon and Lee Remick. The 25 Mar 1961 NYT announced Karl Malden for the role of “Ellis Arnesen,” but he was later replaced by Charles Bickford, who portrayed the character on Playhouse 90.
       However, the 5 Oct 1961 DV later revealed that distributor Twentieth Century-Fox cancelled the project indefinitely. Unidentified sources attributed the decision to a “soaring budget.” On 18 Oct 1961, DV stated that the William Morris Agency was offering the property to other studios. Within two weeks, the 31 Oct 1961 DV announced that Warner Bros. Pictures would finance and distribute the picture. According to the 23 Feb 1962 DV, principal photography was scheduled ... More Less

The title was derived from the poem, “Vitae Summa Brevis” by Ernest Dowson: “They are not long, the days of wine an roses, out of a misty dream our path emerges for a while, then closes within the dream.”
       The 28 Jan 1960 NYT reported that producer Martin Manulis was returning to Broadway after heading an independent film production company affiliated with Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation. His first project would be a stage version of the J. P. Miller teleplay, Days of Wine and Roses, which originally aired on Playhouse 90 (CBS, 4 Oct 1956—18 May 1960) in 1958. John Frankenheimer, who directed the teleplay, would also helm its stage counterpart. One year later, the 28 Jan 1961 NYT stated that Manulis chose instead to adapt the story as his first motion picture, with Blake Edwards as director, and a cast headed by Jack Lemmon and Lee Remick. The 25 Mar 1961 NYT announced Karl Malden for the role of “Ellis Arnesen,” but he was later replaced by Charles Bickford, who portrayed the character on Playhouse 90.
       However, the 5 Oct 1961 DV later revealed that distributor Twentieth Century-Fox cancelled the project indefinitely. Unidentified sources attributed the decision to a “soaring budget.” On 18 Oct 1961, DV stated that the William Morris Agency was offering the property to other studios. Within two weeks, the 31 Oct 1961 DV announced that Warner Bros. Pictures would finance and distribute the picture. According to the 23 Feb 1962 DV, principal photography was scheduled to begin 10 Feb 1962 in San Francisco, CA. The 2 Feb 1962 LAT mistakenly listed Piper Laurie, who starred in the television version, as the female lead. Heavy rains hindered filming at the start of production, as noted in the 13 Feb 1962 DV. The cast was currently on location at the Blue Fox restaurant in San Francisco.
       Jack Lemmon told the 8 Apr 1962 NYT that the film would include more comical elements than the teleplay, mostly in the “directing and acting.” He also explained that he needed a pool table on set, as the game helped him maintain his “emotional level.” Manulis stated that the expanded story followed the protagonists through courtship into married life, making them more sympathetic to the audience. The 20 Feb 1962 DV noted that the production was headquartered at the Jack Tar Hotel. According to a news item in the 16 Mar 1962 DV, Edwards and his staff planned to scout locations in Newport Beach, CA, over the next two days. On 10 Apr 1962, DV announced that filming was underway at Warner Bros. Studios in Burbank, CA. Ten days later, the 20 Apr 1962 DV noted that production was in its “final stages.” Post-production was underway by 23 Apr 1962, as stated in that day’s DV. The 6 Jul 1962 NYT reported the completion of editing.
       Casting announcements included Myrna Ross (17 Feb 1962 LAT); Edward O’Brien (21 Feb 1962 DV); television announcer Jerry Jensen (23 Feb 1962 DV); James Lanphier (27 Mar 1962 DV); Chuck Hicks, Chuck Wood, and John Truax (29 Mar 1962 DV); Jack Richardson (3 Apr 1962 DV); Lynn Borden (4 Apr 1962 DV); Billy Greene (17 Apr 1962 DV); Charles Watts and Claudia Bryar (24 Apr 1962 DV); Lenore Roberts and Beverly Hills (27 Apr 1962 DV). According to the 17 Feb 1962 LAT, the picture marked the screen debuts of John Bard Manulis, son of Martin Manulis, and Jennifer Edwards, daughter of Blake Edwards.
       Days of Wine and Roses opened 25 Dec 1962 at the Fox Vogue Theater in Los Angeles, assuring its eligibility for the upcoming Academy Award competition, according to the 2 Dec 1962 LAT. The New York City opening followed on 17 Jan 1963 at Radio City Music Hall. Reviews were generally positive, although the 29 Nov 1962 DV noted that picture’s storyline was rather depressing, which might limit its appeal. The Los Angeles run continued at the Vogue through Feb 1963, and went into citywide release the following month, as stated in the 7 Mar 1963 LAT. Opening week receipts for New York City were estimated at $162,000 in the 25 Jan 1963 DV. As was often the case at Radio City Music Hall, the picture was accompanied by a stage show.
       The film won an Academy Award for Henry Mancini and Johnny Mercer’s title song. It was also nominated for Actor (Jack Lemmon), Actress (Lee Remick), Art Direction—Black-and-White (Joseph Wright and George James Hopkins), and Costume Design—Black-and-White (Don Feld). In addition, it garnered awards for Lemmon, Remick, and Edwards at Spain’s San Sebastian International Film Festival. Spain also honored Lemmon with Fotogramas de Plata and Sant Jordi awards. He and Remick both received Golden Laurel Awards for Top Dramatic Performance. A news item in the 2 Jan 1963 DV stated that the picture received the Parents magazine Merit Award.
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
5 Oct 1961
p. 1.
Daily Variety
18 Oct 1961
p. 1.
Daily Variety
31 Oct 1961
p. 2.
Daily Variety
9 Feb 1962
p. 22.
Daily Variety
13 Feb 1962
p. 9.
Daily Variety
20 Feb 1962
p. 12.
Daily Variety
21 Feb 1962
p. 4.
Daily Variety
23 Feb 1962
p. 14, 20.
Daily Variety
16 Mar 1962
p. 4.
Daily Variety
27 Mar 1962
p. 6.
Daily Variety
29 Mar 1962
p. 13.
Daily Variety
3 Apr 1962
p. 10.
Daily Variety
4 Apr 1962
p. 4.
Daily Variety
10 Apr 1962
p. 11.
Daily Variety
17 Apr 1962
p. 13.
Daily Variety
20 Apr 1962
p. 7.
Daily Variety
23 Apr 1962
p. 1.
Daily Variety
24 Apr 1962
p. 6.
Daily Variety
27 Apr 1962
p. 4.
Daily Variety
29 Nov 1962
p. 3.
Daily Variety
2 Jan 1963
p. 2.
Daily Variety
25 Jan 1963
p. 3.
Daily Variety
18 Apr 1963
p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
2 Feb 1962
Section A, p. 13.
Los Angeles Times
17 Feb 1962
Section A, p. 9.
Los Angeles Times
14 Apr 1963
Section F, p. 7.
Los Angeles Times
2 Dec 1962
Section Q, p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
10 Dec 1962
Section D, p. 17.
Los Angeles Times
26 Dec 1962
Section D, p. 13.
Los Angeles Times
26 Feb 1963
p. 23.
Los Angeles Times
7 Mar 1963
p. 26.
Los Angeles Times
13 Dec 1963
Section D, p. 18.
New York Times
28 Jan 1960
p. 27.
New York Times
28 Jan 1961
p. 12.
New York Times
25 Mar 1961
p. 16.
New York Times
8 Apr 1962
Section X, p. 7.
New York Times
6 Jul 1962
p. 13.
New York Times
18 Jan 1963
p. 7.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Asst cam
Asst cam
ART DIRECTOR
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATOR
COSTUMES
Cost
MUSIC
VISUAL EFFECTS
MAKEUP
Makeup supv
Makeup
Hairstyles
Hairstyles
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit mgr
Scr supv
Dial supv
Stills
Gaffer
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the teleplay "Days of Wine and Roses" by J. P. Miller on Playhouse 90 (CBS, 2 Oct 1958).
AUTHOR
SONGS
"Days of Wine and Roses," words and music by Johnny Mercer and Henry Mancini.
DETAILS
Release Date:
25 December 1962
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 25 December 1962
New York opening: 17 January 1963
Production Date:
10 February--late April 1962
Copyright Claimant:
Martin Manulis
Copyright Date:
30 November 1962
Copyright Number:
LP27113
Duration(in mins):
117
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Joe Clay, a hard-working, hard-drinking public relations man in San Francisco, meets Kirsten Arnesen, a young secretary who adores chocolate but hates liquor. Joe, however, quickly converts her to drink, and within a few months after their marriage, she is able to match him drink for drink. After losing five jobs within the next 4 years, Joe decides that he and Kirsten need to become sober. They move in with Kirsten's father at his plant nursery and stay off alcohol for several weeks. But one night they go on a monumental binge, and Joe, after destroying the greenhouse looking for a bottle he has hidden, is admitted to a hospital detoxification ward. Hungerford, an ex-addict, encourages him to join Alcoholics Anonymous, but he is lured back to drink by Kirsten. Realizing that they are doomed as long as Kirsten refuses to admit to her alcoholism, Joe takes their child and moves into another apartment. With the help of AA, he is able to reestablish his career and regain his self-respect. One night Kirsten visits him and begs to be taken back, but Joe sends her away when she refuses to give up ... +


Joe Clay, a hard-working, hard-drinking public relations man in San Francisco, meets Kirsten Arnesen, a young secretary who adores chocolate but hates liquor. Joe, however, quickly converts her to drink, and within a few months after their marriage, she is able to match him drink for drink. After losing five jobs within the next 4 years, Joe decides that he and Kirsten need to become sober. They move in with Kirsten's father at his plant nursery and stay off alcohol for several weeks. But one night they go on a monumental binge, and Joe, after destroying the greenhouse looking for a bottle he has hidden, is admitted to a hospital detoxification ward. Hungerford, an ex-addict, encourages him to join Alcoholics Anonymous, but he is lured back to drink by Kirsten. Realizing that they are doomed as long as Kirsten refuses to admit to her alcoholism, Joe takes their child and moves into another apartment. With the help of AA, he is able to reestablish his career and regain his self-respect. One night Kirsten visits him and begs to be taken back, but Joe sends her away when she refuses to give up drinking. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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