The Raven (1963)

86 mins | Comedy-drama | 25 January 1963

Director:

Roger Corman

Producer:

Roger Corman

Cinematographer:

Floyd Crosby

Editor:

Ronald Sinclair

Production Designer:

Daniel Haller

Production Company:

Alta Vista Productions
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HISTORY

The 17 Jul 1962 LAT reported that the upcoming production of The Raven was prompted by the success of Tales of Terror (1962, see entry), the latest release from American International Pictures (AIP) based on stories by Edgar Allan Poe. The 11 Jun 1962 DV noted that stars Vincent Price and Peter Lorre were recently contracted to the company for five years and three years, respectively. According to production charts in the 21 Sep 1962 DV, principal photography began that day at Producers Studio (later Raleigh Studios) in Los Angeles, CA.
       The 20 Jan 1963 LAT noted that The Raven was Peter Lorre’s second horror film, and the first in which he co-starred with Boris Karloff. It also marked the motion picture debut of actress Olive Sturgess, who told the 10 Feb 1963 LAT that she was frequently the object of the veteran actors’ pranks during production. Appearing in his second feature film was William “Tiny Tim” Baskin, described in the 17 Sep 1962 DV as a “6’8”, 300-lb. clown” from the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus. Filming was completed in seventeen days.
       The Raven opened 25 Jan 1963 in New York City. Openings at twenty-three Los Angeles, CA, theaters followed on 30 Jan 1963. The film earned $206,000 in its first week, according to the 5 Feb 1963 DV. A review in the 1 Feb 1963 LAT noted that it shared a bill with the Italian production, Warriors Five (1962). ... More Less

The 17 Jul 1962 LAT reported that the upcoming production of The Raven was prompted by the success of Tales of Terror (1962, see entry), the latest release from American International Pictures (AIP) based on stories by Edgar Allan Poe. The 11 Jun 1962 DV noted that stars Vincent Price and Peter Lorre were recently contracted to the company for five years and three years, respectively. According to production charts in the 21 Sep 1962 DV, principal photography began that day at Producers Studio (later Raleigh Studios) in Los Angeles, CA.
       The 20 Jan 1963 LAT noted that The Raven was Peter Lorre’s second horror film, and the first in which he co-starred with Boris Karloff. It also marked the motion picture debut of actress Olive Sturgess, who told the 10 Feb 1963 LAT that she was frequently the object of the veteran actors’ pranks during production. Appearing in his second feature film was William “Tiny Tim” Baskin, described in the 17 Sep 1962 DV as a “6’8”, 300-lb. clown” from the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus. Filming was completed in seventeen days.
       The Raven opened 25 Jan 1963 in New York City. Openings at twenty-three Los Angeles, CA, theaters followed on 30 Jan 1963. The film earned $206,000 in its first week, according to the 5 Feb 1963 DV. A review in the 1 Feb 1963 LAT noted that it shared a bill with the Italian production, Warriors Five (1962). Critical notices were generally positive, although the 26 Jan 1963 NYT suggested that the picture was best suited to “the kiddies and the bird-brained.” The New York City opening included the French release, White Slave Ship (1962), on the bill.
       The 9 Mar 1964 LAT announced that “Jim Jr.,” the raven appearing in the title role, was nominated for a Patsy Award, along with several other animal actors.
More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
8 Jun 1962
p. 4.
Daily Variety
11 Jun 1962
p. 3.
Daily Variety
17 Sep 1962
p. 2.
Daily Variety
21 Sep 1962
p. 8.
Daily Variety
31 Jan 1963
p. 3.
Daily Variety
5 Feb 1963
p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
17 Jul 1962
Section C, p. 7.
Los Angeles Times
20 Jan 1963
Section M, p. 4.
Los Angeles Times
25 Jan 1963
Section C, p. 9.
Los Angeles Times
1 Feb 1963
Section D, p. 10.
Los Angeles Times
10 Feb 1963
Section K, p. 8.
Los Angeles Times
9 Mar 1964
Section C, p. 17.
New York Times
14 Jul 1962
p. 11.
New York Times
26 Jan 1963
p. 5.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
Ward
MUSIC
Mus coordinator
SOUND
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hairstyles
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod supv
Unit mgr
Raven trainer
Stills
Constr coordinator
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the poem "The Raven" by Edgar Allan Poe in New York Evening Mirror (29 Jan 1845).
DETAILS
Release Date:
25 January 1963
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 25 January 1963
Los Angeles opening: 30 January 1963
Production Date:
21 December--early October 1962
Copyright Claimant:
Alta Vista Productions
Copyright Date:
27 January 1963
Copyright Number:
LP24570
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Pathé
Widescreen/ratio
Panavision
Duration(in mins):
86
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Dr. Erasmus Craven, a 15th-century English magician, goes into retirement following the apparent death of his wife, Lenore. He is startled one night by the appearance of a talking raven, who turns out to be Dr. Adolphus Bedlo, a former magician turned into a bird for daring to challenge the power of the master sorcerer, Dr. Scarabus. After Craven returns him to human form, Bedlo divulges that a woman resembling Lenore is living at the Scarabus castle. Accompanied by Craven's daughter, Estelle, and Bedlo's son, Rexford, the two magicians visit the castle and learn that Lenore feigned death to become Scarabus' mistress. The master sorcerer imprisons his guests and threatens to torture Estelle unless Craven reveals the secrets of his magical powers. Bedlo, who is actually a party to a plot with Scarabus to get Craven to divulge his magic secrets, tries to back out of the agreement, and Scarabus changes him into a raven once more. The bird, however, cuts Craven's bonds, enabling him to challenge Scarabus to a duel of magic, which results in the death of Scarabus and Lenore in a castle fire. Later, Craven takes the raven home with him, but he is in no hurry to change Bedlo back into a ... +


Dr. Erasmus Craven, a 15th-century English magician, goes into retirement following the apparent death of his wife, Lenore. He is startled one night by the appearance of a talking raven, who turns out to be Dr. Adolphus Bedlo, a former magician turned into a bird for daring to challenge the power of the master sorcerer, Dr. Scarabus. After Craven returns him to human form, Bedlo divulges that a woman resembling Lenore is living at the Scarabus castle. Accompanied by Craven's daughter, Estelle, and Bedlo's son, Rexford, the two magicians visit the castle and learn that Lenore feigned death to become Scarabus' mistress. The master sorcerer imprisons his guests and threatens to torture Estelle unless Craven reveals the secrets of his magical powers. Bedlo, who is actually a party to a plot with Scarabus to get Craven to divulge his magic secrets, tries to back out of the agreement, and Scarabus changes him into a raven once more. The bird, however, cuts Craven's bonds, enabling him to challenge Scarabus to a duel of magic, which results in the death of Scarabus and Lenore in a castle fire. Later, Craven takes the raven home with him, but he is in no hurry to change Bedlo back into a man. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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