Tony Rome (1967)

110 mins | Melodrama | 15 November 1967

Director:

Gordon Douglas

Producer:

Aaron Rosenberg

Cinematographer:

Joseph Biroc

Editor:

Robert Simpson

Production Designers:

Jack Martin Smith, James Roth

Production Company:

Arcola--Millfield Productions
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HISTORY

The 3 Feb 1967 editions of DV and LAT announced that Frank Sinatra would star in Shamus, the first of two Twentieth Century-Fox crime films. The second would be an adaptation of novelist Roderick Thorp’s The Detective (1968, see entry). Shamus was based on the 1960 novel Miami Mayhem by Anthony Rome, a pen name of Marvin H. Albert. Filming was set begin 3 Apr 1967 in Miami and Miami Beach, FL.
       Director Gordon Douglas, who had already worked with Sinatra on Young at Heart (1954, see entry) and Robin and the 7 Hoods (1964, see entry), was chosen to direct Shamus. Because of Sinatra’s concurrent three-week stand at Miami Beach’s Fontainebleau Hotel, filming would remain in the area, the 9 Mar 1967 and 31 Mar 1967 editions of DV reported. As a concession to his shooting schedule, Sinatra would limit himself to only one show a night. His opening act, comedian Shecky Greene, also had a role in the film, as did Lenny Dawson and his Fontainebleau Hotel Club Gigi Orchestra.
       The 23 Mar 1967 DV noted that the film’s title was changed from Shamus to Tony Rome. Principal photography began as scheduled on 3 Apr 1967, according to a production chart in the 7 Apr 1967 DV.
       Wendell Corey was set for the featured role of a disgraced physician, the 2 May 1967 DV, but was later replaced by Jeffrey Lynn.
       The 11 May 1967 DV announced that filming would end that night, eighteen ... More Less

The 3 Feb 1967 editions of DV and LAT announced that Frank Sinatra would star in Shamus, the first of two Twentieth Century-Fox crime films. The second would be an adaptation of novelist Roderick Thorp’s The Detective (1968, see entry). Shamus was based on the 1960 novel Miami Mayhem by Anthony Rome, a pen name of Marvin H. Albert. Filming was set begin 3 Apr 1967 in Miami and Miami Beach, FL.
       Director Gordon Douglas, who had already worked with Sinatra on Young at Heart (1954, see entry) and Robin and the 7 Hoods (1964, see entry), was chosen to direct Shamus. Because of Sinatra’s concurrent three-week stand at Miami Beach’s Fontainebleau Hotel, filming would remain in the area, the 9 Mar 1967 and 31 Mar 1967 editions of DV reported. As a concession to his shooting schedule, Sinatra would limit himself to only one show a night. His opening act, comedian Shecky Greene, also had a role in the film, as did Lenny Dawson and his Fontainebleau Hotel Club Gigi Orchestra.
       The 23 Mar 1967 DV noted that the film’s title was changed from Shamus to Tony Rome. Principal photography began as scheduled on 3 Apr 1967, according to a production chart in the 7 Apr 1967 DV.
       Wendell Corey was set for the featured role of a disgraced physician, the 2 May 1967 DV, but was later replaced by Jeffrey Lynn.
       The 11 May 1967 DV announced that filming would end that night, eighteen days ahead of schedule. An actor hired to play a pawnbroker in the film’s final scene was not due to arrive in Miami until the next day, so Douglas shot the scene without him, using Sinatra’s real-life attorney, Milton “Mickey” Rubin, in the role.
       The film’s premiere was held at Miami’s Carib Theatre on 10 Nov 1967, the 15 Nov 1967 Var reported. The before-and-after parties were held at the Fontainebleau Hotel. The 29 Nov 1967 Var announced that Tony Rome opened nationally in 194 theaters that week. Reviews were mixed. The 16 Nov 1967 NYT accused Sinatra of imitating Humphrey Bogart’s “Sam Spade” character from The Maltese Falcon (1941, see entry), called the “vivid melodrama” a “demonstration of social vulgarity, degeneracy and crime…to satisfy the most lurid tourist taste,” and commented that there were enough “trade names of hotels, cars and beer” to give “the impression it’s an advertising film.” The 22 Nov 1967 LAT credited Sinatra with providing enough energy to improve what was otherwise “thin, familiar stuff.”
       After filming The Detective later in the year, Sinatra and the Tony Rome creative team made a sequel, Lady in Cement (1968, see entry), based on another Marvin H. Albert novel, The Lady in Cement. A third film, based on a third Albert novel called My Kind of Game, was planned, according to the 5 Jun 1967 LAT and 14 Jun 1967 Var, but never made. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
3 Feb 1967
p. 1.
Daily Variety
9 Mar 1967
p. 6.
Daily Variety
23 Mar 1967
p. 15.
Daily Variety
31 Mar 1967
p. 16.
Daily Variety
7 Apr 1967
p. 12.
Daily Variety
2 May 1967
p. 3.
Daily Variety
5 May 1967
p. 10.
Daily Variety
11 May 1967
p. 4.
Daily Variety
2 Jun 1967
p. 2.
Los Angeles Times
3 Feb 1967
Section D, p. 12.
Los Angeles Times
2 May 1967
Section D, p. 12.
Los Angeles Times
23 May 1967
Section D, p. 9.
Los Angeles Times
5 Jun 1967
Section D, p. 25.
Los Angeles Times
22 Nov 1967
Section C, p. 1.
New York Times
16 Nov 1967
p. 58.
Variety
12 Apr 1967
p. 65.
Variety
26 Apr 1967
p. 201.
Variety
14 Jun 1967
p. 11.
Variety
15 Nov 1967
p. 17.
Variety
29 Nov 1967
p. 16.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Action seq dir
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
Cost des & supervision
Women's fashion des
Women's fashion des
MUSIC
Mus comp & cond
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hairstyles
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit prod mgr
Asst to the prod
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Miami Mayhem by Anthony Rome (New York, 1960).
SONGS
Nancy Sinatra sings "Tony Rome," music and lyrics by Lee Hazlewood
"Something Here Inside Me" and "Hard Times," music and lyrics by Billy May and Randy Newman.
PERFORMER
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Shamus
Release Date:
15 November 1967
Premiere Information:
Miami premiere: 10 November 1967
New York opening: 15 November 1967
Los Angeles opening: 22 November 1967
Production Date:
3 April--11 May 1967
Copyright Claimant:
Arcola--Millfield Productions
Copyright Date:
10 November 1967
Copyright Number:
LP34998
Physical Properties:
Sound
Westrex
Color
De Luxe
Widescreen/ratio
Panavision
Duration(in mins):
110
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In return for a fee, Miami Beach private eye Tony Rome helps remove drunken, unconscious Diana Pines from a room in the motel operated by his former partner, Ralph Turpin. Tony takes Diana to her family's mansion, and the girl's millionaire father, construction magnate Rudolph Kosterman, hires him to find out what is troubling his recently married daughter. Meanwhile, Diana's stepmother, Rita, offers Tony a fee if he will inform her first of his discoveries. After learning that Diana has lost a diamond pin, Tony is chloroformed and beaten by two thugs and nearly strangled by the girl's imbecilic stepuncle; later, he discovers that Turpin has been shot to death in his office. Assisted in his sleuthing by predatory divorcée Ann Archer, the detective learns that Diana has been giving large sums of money to her alcoholic mother, Lorna, and that Rita's valuable jewelry has been replaced with paste imitations. In pursuit of evidence, Tony has a series of conflicts with a stripteaser and her lesbian lover, a drug addict and her homosexual contact, the two murderers of the jeweler who was making the paste imitations for Rita, and with his old friend Lieutenant Santini of the Miami police, who wants information that Tony possesses. After an attempt is made on Kosterman's life, Tony learns that Turpin was murdered by Rita's ex-husband, Nimmo, who has been blackmailing her because their divorce was never legalized. Nimmo eventually dies from wounds inflicted by Turpin, and the case is finally solved when Lorna's second husband, Adam Boyd, a doctor who lost his license for performing abortions, confesses that he tried to kill Kosterman so that Diana could inherit the family fortune. After ... +


In return for a fee, Miami Beach private eye Tony Rome helps remove drunken, unconscious Diana Pines from a room in the motel operated by his former partner, Ralph Turpin. Tony takes Diana to her family's mansion, and the girl's millionaire father, construction magnate Rudolph Kosterman, hires him to find out what is troubling his recently married daughter. Meanwhile, Diana's stepmother, Rita, offers Tony a fee if he will inform her first of his discoveries. After learning that Diana has lost a diamond pin, Tony is chloroformed and beaten by two thugs and nearly strangled by the girl's imbecilic stepuncle; later, he discovers that Turpin has been shot to death in his office. Assisted in his sleuthing by predatory divorcée Ann Archer, the detective learns that Diana has been giving large sums of money to her alcoholic mother, Lorna, and that Rita's valuable jewelry has been replaced with paste imitations. In pursuit of evidence, Tony has a series of conflicts with a stripteaser and her lesbian lover, a drug addict and her homosexual contact, the two murderers of the jeweler who was making the paste imitations for Rita, and with his old friend Lieutenant Santini of the Miami police, who wants information that Tony possesses. After an attempt is made on Kosterman's life, Tony learns that Turpin was murdered by Rita's ex-husband, Nimmo, who has been blackmailing her because their divorce was never legalized. Nimmo eventually dies from wounds inflicted by Turpin, and the case is finally solved when Lorna's second husband, Adam Boyd, a doctor who lost his license for performing abortions, confesses that he tried to kill Kosterman so that Diana could inherit the family fortune. After Santini arrests the doctor, Tony decides to take a vacation with Ann, but she chooses to return to a safer life with her former husband. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.