Rough Night in Jericho (1967)

104 mins | Western | September 1967

Director:

Arnold Laven

Producer:

Martin Rackin

Cinematographer:

Russell Metty

Editor:

Ted J. Kent

Production Designers:

Alexander Golitzen, Frank Arrigo

Production Company:

Martin Rackin Productions
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HISTORY

Official U.S. Copyright records list The Man in Black author Marvin H. Albert as Marvin Albert Conroy, a combination of his real name and his occasional pseudonym “Al Conroy.”
       On 28 Sep 1965, DV announced that producer Martin Rackin had acquired rights to Albert’s western novel and was set to begin development as part of a two-picture arrangement with Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp. following the completion of Stagecoach (1966, see entry). A 7 Apr 1966 DV brief indicated that Stagecoach star Van Heflin was in negotiations to appear alongside William Holden.
       By the summer, however, Rackin and his associate producer Alvin G. Manuel parted ways with Fox amid complications likely related to a lawsuit recently brought against Rackin and the studio by Lansall Corp., which currently held the rights to the 1939 version of Stagecoach (see entry). On 27 Jun 1966, DV reported that Rackin and Manuel had moved The Man in Black to Universal Pictures, and one month later, the 28 Jul 1966 edition announced the hiring of actors Dean Martin and George Peppard under director Arnold Laven. A 22 Aug 1966 DV item revealed that the filmmakers considered casting a relatively “unknown” actress such as Marlyn Mason for “Molly Lang” before selecting Jean Simmons.
       Around this time, the 16 Sep 1966 DV indicated that Sydney Boehm was contributing to Marvin H. Albert’s screenplay, which had since been renamed Rough Night in Jericho. Although a 21 Sep 1966 DV brief listed the start of principal photography as 26 Sep 1966, the 28 Sep ... More Less

Official U.S. Copyright records list The Man in Black author Marvin H. Albert as Marvin Albert Conroy, a combination of his real name and his occasional pseudonym “Al Conroy.”
       On 28 Sep 1965, DV announced that producer Martin Rackin had acquired rights to Albert’s western novel and was set to begin development as part of a two-picture arrangement with Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp. following the completion of Stagecoach (1966, see entry). A 7 Apr 1966 DV brief indicated that Stagecoach star Van Heflin was in negotiations to appear alongside William Holden.
       By the summer, however, Rackin and his associate producer Alvin G. Manuel parted ways with Fox amid complications likely related to a lawsuit recently brought against Rackin and the studio by Lansall Corp., which currently held the rights to the 1939 version of Stagecoach (see entry). On 27 Jun 1966, DV reported that Rackin and Manuel had moved The Man in Black to Universal Pictures, and one month later, the 28 Jul 1966 edition announced the hiring of actors Dean Martin and George Peppard under director Arnold Laven. A 22 Aug 1966 DV item revealed that the filmmakers considered casting a relatively “unknown” actress such as Marlyn Mason for “Molly Lang” before selecting Jean Simmons.
       Around this time, the 16 Sep 1966 DV indicated that Sydney Boehm was contributing to Marvin H. Albert’s screenplay, which had since been renamed Rough Night in Jericho. Although a 21 Sep 1966 DV brief listed the start of principal photography as 26 Sep 1966, the 28 Sep 1966 Var announced that shooting had only just begun that day. Filming took place on location in Kanab, UT, and at the Universal studio backlot in Universal City, CA. According to the 28 Nov 1966 LAT, Charles Washburn worked on the film as an assistant director through Universal after becoming the first African-American to be admitted to the Directors Guild of America’s assistant directors program.
       An item in the 11 Oct 1966 DV stated that a saloon sequence required the use of 175 “western [type]” background actors, while another report four days earlier listed the following fifteen stuntmen who participated in the film: Walter Scott, LeRoy Johnson, Henry Wills, Dennis Judd, Dave Burbank, James Skaggs, Bill TeGroen, Larry Duffy, Jim Durand, Jim Blake, Howard Henshaw, Zeke Morgan, Jeff Kane, Ken White, and Lew Girrard.
       Additional DV, Var, and LAT casting announcements throughout production claimed that Joan Twelve, Lawrence Mann, Ned Flory, Joe Gray, Leo Needham, Rick Warwick, Don Ross, Fred Krone, and Ray Saunders had supporting roles in the picture alongside Laven’s wife, Amanda Harley, and Dean Martin’s son, Dean Martin, Jr. Local Kanab barber John Clayton and Universal studio police sergeant William J. Canavally also reportedly appeared in the film, while the 9 Feb 1967 Los Angeles Sentinel stated that Bill Pyle played a trader who is shot by a buffalo hunter portrayed by Chuck Farley.
       According to the 26 Jul 1967 Var, simultaneous world premiere events were scheduled for 11 Aug 1967 at the Majestic Theatre in Dallas, TX, and the nearby Worth Theatre in Fort Worth. First-week box-office reports published in the 27 Sep 1967 Var indicated that Rough Night in Jericho opened in St. Louis, MO, and Philadelphia, PA, in late Sep 1967 before beginning a Los Angeles, CA, engagement on 11 Oct 1967. The New York City opening followed on 8 Nov 1967. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
28 Sep 1965
p. 1, 4.
Daily Variety
7 Apr 1966
p. 2.
Daily Variety
20 Jun 1966
p. 3.
Daily Variety
27 Jun 1966
p. 2.
Daily Variety
28 Jul 1966
p. 4.
Daily Variety
22 Aug 1966
p. 2.
Daily Variety
16 Sep 1966
p. 3.
Daily Variety
21 Sep 1966
p. 6.
Daily Variety
28 Sep 1966
p. 2.
Daily Variety
7 Oct 1966
p. 6.
Daily Variety
11 Oct 1966
p. 2.
Daily Variety
17 Oct 1966
p. 3.
Daily Variety
26 Oct 1966
p. 4.
Daily Variety
31 Oct 1966
p. 4.
Daily Variety
9 Aug 1967
p. 3.
Los Angeles Sentinel
9 Feb 1967
Section B, p. 10.
Los Angeles Times
20 Oct 1966
Section D, p. 19.
Los Angeles Times
28 Nov 1966
Section C, p. 27.
Los Angeles Times
8 Oct 1967
Section D, p. 20.
Los Angeles Times
13 Oct 1967
Section C, p. 14.
New York Times
9 Nov 1967
p. 56.
Variety
28 Sep 1966
p. 18.
Variety
19 Oct 1966
p. 16.
Variety
19 Oct 1966
p. 62.
Variety
26 Jul 1967
p. 11.
Variety
27 Sep 1967
p. 8.
Variety
4 Oct 1967
p. 62.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
2nd unit dir
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus comp
VISUAL EFFECTS
Matte supv
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hairstyles
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Dial coach
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel The Man in Black by Marvin H. Albert (1965).
SONGS
"The Devil Rides in Jericho" and "Hold Me Now and Forever," words and music by Don Costa and Phil Zeller, sung by The Kids Next Door.
PERFORMER
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Man in Black
Release Date:
September 1967
Premiere Information:
Dallas and Forth Worth premieres: 11 August 1967
St. Louis and Philadelphia openings: late September 1967
Los Angeles opening: 11 October 1967
New York opening: 8 November 1967
Production Date:
began 28 September 1966
Copyright Claimant:
Martin Rackin Productions
Copyright Date:
30 September 1967
Copyright Number:
LP37876
Physical Properties:
Sound
Westrex
Color
Technicolor
Widescreen/ratio
Techniscope
Duration(in mins):
104
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

On the outskirts of the western town of Jericho, Alex Flood, an ex-lawman turned gang boss, ambushes a stagecoach carrying a single passenger--Dolan, once a U. S. marshal and now a professional gambler. After arriving in Jericho with the wounded stage driver, Ben Hickman, Dolan learns that the ruthless Flood is determined to wrest control of the stagecoach line from Ben and his attractive partner, Molly Lang. Molly refuses to yield to Flood's demands, however, and tries to rouse the townspeople into taking a stand against his lawlessness. Although Dolan is attracted to Molly, he considers her cause a hopeless one, and he leaves town, but he has a change of heart and returns to challenge Flood. Hastily formulating a plan of attack, Dolan and a handful of volunteers steal Flood's cattle, dynamite his ranch house and granary, and blow up his mine. As Flood makes plans to invade the town, Dolan and Molly rally enough supporters to wage a bloody gunfight. Flood shoots Ben in the back and then flees to a mountain wilderness, pursued by Dolan. When the two men confront each other in a clearing, Dolan kills ... +


On the outskirts of the western town of Jericho, Alex Flood, an ex-lawman turned gang boss, ambushes a stagecoach carrying a single passenger--Dolan, once a U. S. marshal and now a professional gambler. After arriving in Jericho with the wounded stage driver, Ben Hickman, Dolan learns that the ruthless Flood is determined to wrest control of the stagecoach line from Ben and his attractive partner, Molly Lang. Molly refuses to yield to Flood's demands, however, and tries to rouse the townspeople into taking a stand against his lawlessness. Although Dolan is attracted to Molly, he considers her cause a hopeless one, and he leaves town, but he has a change of heart and returns to challenge Flood. Hastily formulating a plan of attack, Dolan and a handful of volunteers steal Flood's cattle, dynamite his ranch house and granary, and blow up his mine. As Flood makes plans to invade the town, Dolan and Molly rally enough supporters to wage a bloody gunfight. Flood shoots Ben in the back and then flees to a mountain wilderness, pursued by Dolan. When the two men confront each other in a clearing, Dolan kills Flood. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.