Dirty Dingus Magee (1970)

GP | 90 mins | Western, Comedy | November 1970

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HISTORY

A 2 Mar 1966 Var news item reported that Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Inc. (MGM) had purchased screen rights to David Markson’s 1965 novel, The Ballad of Dingus Magee, for $100,000. The project was slated to be the first of four feature films under new management at MGM, to begin shooting by Mar 1970, the 29 Dec 1969 DV noted. At the time, all but thirty acres of MGM’s 180-acre studio lot in Culver City, CA, were up for sale, according to a 16 Jan 1970 DV article.
       Principal photography was scheduled to begin in Tucson, AZ, on 9 Feb 1970, as stated in the 30 Jan 1970 DV. While on location there, the 24 Aug 1970 DV claimed that filmmakers spent $400,000-$500,000 on food and lodging. Following six weeks in Arizona, the 18 Mar 1970 DV confirmed that production had resumed that day on the MGM lot. On 1 Apr 1970, a Var brief indicated that principal photography was “finishing up” at the studio.
       According to a news item in the 20 Mar 1970 DV, two Montana women named Pauline Small and Martha Lightfoot were hired as chaperones for the following four Indian women, all over the age of ninety-five, who had been brought to Hollywood to act in the film: Mae Old Coyote, Ina Bad Bear, Florence Real Bird, and Lillian Hogan.
       Lead actor Frank Sinatra was scheduled to perform at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas, NV, around Thanksgiving 1970, which prompted MGM to consider holding the premiere there, as noted in the 1 Jul 1970 LAT. . ... More Less

A 2 Mar 1966 Var news item reported that Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Inc. (MGM) had purchased screen rights to David Markson’s 1965 novel, The Ballad of Dingus Magee, for $100,000. The project was slated to be the first of four feature films under new management at MGM, to begin shooting by Mar 1970, the 29 Dec 1969 DV noted. At the time, all but thirty acres of MGM’s 180-acre studio lot in Culver City, CA, were up for sale, according to a 16 Jan 1970 DV article.
       Principal photography was scheduled to begin in Tucson, AZ, on 9 Feb 1970, as stated in the 30 Jan 1970 DV. While on location there, the 24 Aug 1970 DV claimed that filmmakers spent $400,000-$500,000 on food and lodging. Following six weeks in Arizona, the 18 Mar 1970 DV confirmed that production had resumed that day on the MGM lot. On 1 Apr 1970, a Var brief indicated that principal photography was “finishing up” at the studio.
       According to a news item in the 20 Mar 1970 DV, two Montana women named Pauline Small and Martha Lightfoot were hired as chaperones for the following four Indian women, all over the age of ninety-five, who had been brought to Hollywood to act in the film: Mae Old Coyote, Ina Bad Bear, Florence Real Bird, and Lillian Hogan.
       Lead actor Frank Sinatra was scheduled to perform at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas, NV, around Thanksgiving 1970, which prompted MGM to consider holding the premiere there, as noted in the 1 Jul 1970 LAT. . On 17 Jul 1970, a ninety-six minute version of the picture was shown at a public preview screening, which was reviewed in the 21 Jul 1970 DV. The final version of Dirty Dingus Magee, released in Nov 1970, had a running time of only ninety minutes.
       The 10 Feb 1970 and 2 Apr 1970 issues of DV listed Buster Matlock as the animal action supervisor for the American Humane Association of Hollywood, and Grady Sutton as a cast member. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
29 Dec 1969
p. 1, 16.
Daily Variety
16 Jan 1970
p. 45.
Daily Variety
30 Jan 1970
p. 10.
Daily Variety
10 Feb 1970
p. 12.
Daily Variety
13 Feb 1970
p. 10.
Daily Variety
18 Mar 1970
p. 3.
Daily Variety
20 Mar 1970
p. 14.
Daily Variety
2 Apr 1970
p. 4.
Daily Variety
1 Jul 1970
p. 2.
Daily Variety
21 Jul 1970
p. 3.
Daily Variety
24 Aug 1970
p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
24 Mar 1970
Section E, p. 18.
Los Angeles Times
1 Jul 1970
Section E, p. 16.
Los Angeles Times
10 Nov 1970
Section F, p. 19.
New York Times
19 Nov 1970
p. 42.
Variety
2 Mar 1966
p. 6.
Variety
1 Apr 1970
p. 22.
Variety
4 Nov 1970
p. 24.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Asst dir
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Asst cam
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus & mus dir
Additional mus
VISUAL EFFECTS
MAKEUP
Hairstyles
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit prod mgr
Scr supv
Stunt coordinator
Gaffer
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel The Ballad of Dingus Magee by David Markson (Indianapolis, 1965).
AUTHOR
SONGS
"Dirty Dingus Magee," words and music by Mack David, sung by Mike Curb Congregation
"The Ballad of Dingus Magee," words and music by Mack David and and Jeff Alexander.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Ballad of Dingus Magee
Release Date:
November 1970
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: week of 10 November 1970
New York opening: 18 November 1970
Production Date:
9 February--early April 1970
Copyright Claimant:
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Inc.
Copyright Date:
23 October 1970
Copyright Number:
LP38249
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Metrocolor
Widescreen/ratio
Panavision
Duration(in mins):
90
MPAA Rating:
GP
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
22536
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Robbed by Dirty Dingus Magee, Hoke Birdsill travels to Yerkey's Hole and demands justice from Belle Kops, the town's mayor and madam. In response, the indifferent Belle appoints him sheriff. Although Birdsill repeatedly captures Magee, the bandit, assisted by his Indian mistress Anna Hotwater, escapes as often. Discovering a strongbox Magee has accidentally acquired, Birdsill steals its contents. Diverting the town by announcing a proposed gunfight with his dupe, Magee rifles Belle's bedroom. To his consternation, however, Magee discovers that Birdsill has preceded him. Appointed sheriff in Birdsill's stead, Magee searches for his fellow thief. Reunited, the two join forces and burn Belle's brothel to the ... +


Robbed by Dirty Dingus Magee, Hoke Birdsill travels to Yerkey's Hole and demands justice from Belle Kops, the town's mayor and madam. In response, the indifferent Belle appoints him sheriff. Although Birdsill repeatedly captures Magee, the bandit, assisted by his Indian mistress Anna Hotwater, escapes as often. Discovering a strongbox Magee has accidentally acquired, Birdsill steals its contents. Diverting the town by announcing a proposed gunfight with his dupe, Magee rifles Belle's bedroom. To his consternation, however, Magee discovers that Birdsill has preceded him. Appointed sheriff in Birdsill's stead, Magee searches for his fellow thief. Reunited, the two join forces and burn Belle's brothel to the ground. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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