The McKenzie Break (1970)

108 mins | Melodrama | 1970

Director:

Lamont Johnson

Writer:

William Norton

Cinematographer:

Michael Reed

Editor:

Tom Rolf

Production Designer:

Frank White

Production Company:

Brighton Pictures
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HISTORY

The film's pre-release title was Wolfpack . The film was shot almost entirely in Ireland, aside from the submarine sequence at the end of the film, which was shot off the coast of Turkey. The final scene,with Brian Keith, was shot in Santa ... More Less

The film's pre-release title was Wolfpack . The film was shot almost entirely in Ireland, aside from the submarine sequence at the end of the film, which was shot off the coast of Turkey. The final scene,with Brian Keith, was shot in Santa Monica. More Less

CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Levy-Gardner-Laven Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Prod des
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
MUSIC
SOUND
VISUAL EFFECTS
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Hairstyles
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Scr supv
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel The Bowmanville Break by Sidney Shelley (New York, 1968).
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Wolfpack
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 28 October 1970
Copyright Claimant:
Brighton Pictures
Copyright Date:
28 October 1970
Copyright Number:
LP38901
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
De Luxe
Duration(in mins):
108
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Captain Connor, a tough British Army officer, is called in to quell the rebellion at Camp McKenzie, a World War II prison camp in Scotland. Connor, an Irishman who has been assigned to the camp because of his disregard for military regulations, uses fire hoses to quiet the prisoners, but he suspects that the riot was fomented by the Germans to distract attention from an escape plan. His suspicions are confirmed when Neuchl, a captured pilot, is severely beaten by his fellow prisoners and incoherently mumbles about the escape. Neuchl, ostracized by the prisoners for his homosexual tendencies, is mysteriously strangled before regaining consciousness. Schluetter, a U-boat commander who has been in contact with Berlin, arranges for the escapees to board a German U-boat. A tunnel has been dug that will allow 28 of the prisoners, all of whom are valuable submarine crewmen, to escape to the Scottish coast. Captain Connor decides to allow Schluetter and the Germans to follow through with their plan in the hope that the British will be able to capture the submarine when it picks up the men. Major Perry, the ineffectual camp commander, strongly objects, but Connor allows the prisoners to escape. Schluetter outwits Connor, however, who desperately searches for the escapees in his reconnaissance plane. At the last moment, Connor spots them as they are paddling to the waiting submarine. He radios for the British destroyer which has been placed on standby, but the ship arrives late, and only Schluetter and two of his crew are captured. Connor is left frustrated and facing disciplinary action for his abortive ... +


Captain Connor, a tough British Army officer, is called in to quell the rebellion at Camp McKenzie, a World War II prison camp in Scotland. Connor, an Irishman who has been assigned to the camp because of his disregard for military regulations, uses fire hoses to quiet the prisoners, but he suspects that the riot was fomented by the Germans to distract attention from an escape plan. His suspicions are confirmed when Neuchl, a captured pilot, is severely beaten by his fellow prisoners and incoherently mumbles about the escape. Neuchl, ostracized by the prisoners for his homosexual tendencies, is mysteriously strangled before regaining consciousness. Schluetter, a U-boat commander who has been in contact with Berlin, arranges for the escapees to board a German U-boat. A tunnel has been dug that will allow 28 of the prisoners, all of whom are valuable submarine crewmen, to escape to the Scottish coast. Captain Connor decides to allow Schluetter and the Germans to follow through with their plan in the hope that the British will be able to capture the submarine when it picks up the men. Major Perry, the ineffectual camp commander, strongly objects, but Connor allows the prisoners to escape. Schluetter outwits Connor, however, who desperately searches for the escapees in his reconnaissance plane. At the last moment, Connor spots them as they are paddling to the waiting submarine. He radios for the British destroyer which has been placed on standby, but the ship arrives late, and only Schluetter and two of his crew are captured. Connor is left frustrated and facing disciplinary action for his abortive scheme. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.