Penelope (1966)

97 mins | Comedy | 1966

Director:

Arthur Hiller

Writer:

George Wells

Producer:

Arthur Loew Jr.

Cinematographer:

Harry Stradling

Editor:

Rita Roland

Production Designers:

George W. Davis, Preston Ames

Production Company:

Euterpe, Inc.
Full page view
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
Cost des
Miss Wood's cost
MUSIC
SOUND
Rec supv
MAKEUP
Miss Wood's hairstyles
Hairstyles
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit prod mgr
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Penelope by E. V. Cunningham (New York, 1965).
SONGS
"The Sun Is Gray," words and music by Gale Garnett, sung by Natalie Wood
"Penelope," music by Johnny Williams, lyrics by Leslie Bricusse.
PERFORMER
DETAILS
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 10 November 1966
Copyright Claimant:
Euterpe, Inc.
Copyright Date:
20 October 1966
Copyright Number:
LP33601
Physical Properties:
Sound
Westrex
Color
Metrocolor
Widescreen/ratio
Panavision
Duration(in mins):
97
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Although Penelope Elcott's banker husband James is in love with her, he is constantly preoccupied with business. On a whim, Penelope disguises herself as a sweet old lady and holds up her husband's bank for $60,000. She then goes to the ladies' room, removes her disquise, emerges wearing a yellow suit, informs the guards that a little old lady with a gun is in the washroom, and leaves the bank. Afterwards, she goes to her mentally unbalanced psychiatrist, Gregory Mannix, and confesses her history of kleptomania. A concealed camera has photographed the crime and has caught a rear view of the yellow-suited woman leaving the bank. Police Lieutenant Bixbee begins to suspect Penelope when he notices that the little old lady and the yellow-suited woman in the film have the same walk as she does. Penelope disposes of the yellow suit in a thrift shop, and it is purchased by Sadaba, who runs a fashion boutique. Sadaba learns of the suit's significance, and she and her partner, Ducky, try to blackmail Penelope. Penelope confesses to Dr. Mannix, who attempts to return the $60,000 through the bank's night deposit box and, in his haste, leaves the cash exposed. Penelope confesses to her husband when a streetwalker who finds the money is accused of committing the crime. She is forced to take drastic measures to convince him of the truth of her story, but he refuses to press charges. Penelope reforms, having gained the renewed interest of her ... +


Although Penelope Elcott's banker husband James is in love with her, he is constantly preoccupied with business. On a whim, Penelope disguises herself as a sweet old lady and holds up her husband's bank for $60,000. She then goes to the ladies' room, removes her disquise, emerges wearing a yellow suit, informs the guards that a little old lady with a gun is in the washroom, and leaves the bank. Afterwards, she goes to her mentally unbalanced psychiatrist, Gregory Mannix, and confesses her history of kleptomania. A concealed camera has photographed the crime and has caught a rear view of the yellow-suited woman leaving the bank. Police Lieutenant Bixbee begins to suspect Penelope when he notices that the little old lady and the yellow-suited woman in the film have the same walk as she does. Penelope disposes of the yellow suit in a thrift shop, and it is purchased by Sadaba, who runs a fashion boutique. Sadaba learns of the suit's significance, and she and her partner, Ducky, try to blackmail Penelope. Penelope confesses to Dr. Mannix, who attempts to return the $60,000 through the bank's night deposit box and, in his haste, leaves the cash exposed. Penelope confesses to her husband when a streetwalker who finds the money is accused of committing the crime. She is forced to take drastic measures to convince him of the truth of her story, but he refuses to press charges. Penelope reforms, having gained the renewed interest of her husband. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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