Greyfriars Bobby (1961)

91 mins | Comedy-drama | 11 October 1961

Director:

Don Chaffey

Writer:

Robert Westerby

Producer:

Walt Disney

Cinematographer:

Paul Beeson

Editor:

Peter Tanner

Production Designer:

Michael Stringer

Production Company:

Walt Disney Productions
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HISTORY

On 16 May 1958, DV announced that producer Walt Disney had acquired screen rights to Eleanor Atkinson’s beloved 1912 novel, Greyfriars Bobby, based on the true story of a devoted dog in Edinburgh, Scotland, who sat watch by his deceased owner’s grave many years after the man’s passing. Eleanore Griffin was enlisted to adapt the screenplay for a live-action feature film. Two months later, the 18 Jun 1958 Var reported that Walt Disney Productions producer Alan Jaggs recently arrived in Edinburgh to scout locations, although filming was not scheduled to begin until the following year. The 20 Apr 1960 Var reported that Walt Disney and associate producer Hugh Attwooll, on another location scout in Edinburgh, visited local farms as well as the Greyfriars Bobby statue commemorating the famous dog.
       Principal photography began in Edinburgh on 4 Jul 1960, as noted in a 10 Aug 1960 Var production chart. When location shooting was completed, cast and crew moved to Shepperton Studios in London, England.
       A 22 Mar 1962 DV item noted that at the conclusion of filming, Disney gave the Skye terrier who appears in the picture to an Edinburgh home for handicapped children.
       In otherwise positive reviews, the 12 Oct 1961 NYT and 20 Oct 1961 LAT lamented that many of the actors’ heavy Scottish accents obscured their ... More Less

On 16 May 1958, DV announced that producer Walt Disney had acquired screen rights to Eleanor Atkinson’s beloved 1912 novel, Greyfriars Bobby, based on the true story of a devoted dog in Edinburgh, Scotland, who sat watch by his deceased owner’s grave many years after the man’s passing. Eleanore Griffin was enlisted to adapt the screenplay for a live-action feature film. Two months later, the 18 Jun 1958 Var reported that Walt Disney Productions producer Alan Jaggs recently arrived in Edinburgh to scout locations, although filming was not scheduled to begin until the following year. The 20 Apr 1960 Var reported that Walt Disney and associate producer Hugh Attwooll, on another location scout in Edinburgh, visited local farms as well as the Greyfriars Bobby statue commemorating the famous dog.
       Principal photography began in Edinburgh on 4 Jul 1960, as noted in a 10 Aug 1960 Var production chart. When location shooting was completed, cast and crew moved to Shepperton Studios in London, England.
       A 22 Mar 1962 DV item noted that at the conclusion of filming, Disney gave the Skye terrier who appears in the picture to an Edinburgh home for handicapped children.
       In otherwise positive reviews, the 12 Oct 1961 NYT and 20 Oct 1961 LAT lamented that many of the actors’ heavy Scottish accents obscured their lines. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
16 May 1958
p. 2.
Daily Variety
18 Jul 1961
pp. 3-4.
Daily Variety
22 Mar 1962
p. 2.
Los Angeles Times
26 Jun 1960
Section F, p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
20 Oct 1961
Section A, p. 8.
Los Angeles Times
1 Nov 1961
Section A, p. 11.
New York Times
26 Jul 1959
---
New York Times
11 Oct 1961
p. 51.
New York Times
12 Oct 1961
p. 41.
Variety
18 Jun 1958
p. 13.
Variety
20 Apr 1960
p. 19.
Variety
10 Aug 1960
p. 18.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Asst dir
Asst dir
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
2nd unit photog
Focus
2nd unit focus
1st unit grip
2nd unit grip
ART DIRECTOR
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
1st asst ed
2nd asst ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Scenic artist
COSTUMES
Cost des
Ward master
MUSIC
Mus comp & cond
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec photog eff
MAKEUP
Makeup supv
Hairdresser
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Prod secy
Unit mgr
Asst cont
Dialect adv
Stills
Stills
Prop buyer
Constr mgr
Ch draughtsman
Casting
Dog trainer
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Greyfriars Bobby by Eleanor Atkinson (New York, 1912).
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Greyfriars Bobby: The True Story of a Dog
Release Date:
11 October 1961
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 11 October 1961
Los Angeles opening: 18 October 1961
Production Date:
began 4 July 1960
Copyright Claimant:
Walt Disney Productions
Copyright Date:
17 April 1961
Copyright Number:
LP20321
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
91
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

A hundred years ago in the Lammermuir Hills near Edinburgh, a little Skye terrier called Bobby is the devoted pet of Old Jock, a poor shepherd. When Jock loses his job because he is too old and infirm to work, he goes to Edinburgh, followed by the faithful Bobby. Before long the old man dies of pneumonia in a wretched lodging house and is laid to rest in Greyfriars' Kirkyard. Following Jock's death, Bobby spends his days begging food from Mr. Traill, the kindly owner of an eatinghouse, and playing with the local poor children. But by night the little animal avoids the crotchety caretaker of the churchyard, Mr. Brown, and keeps a vigil on Old Jock's grave. Eventually Bobby's charm wins over the caretaker and his wife, as well as most of the townspeople. Consequently, when the question of the dog's not having a license is brought to court, both Mr. Traill and Mrs. Brown insist upon paying for it. However, when the Edinburgh waifs also burst into court with the necessary funds, the Lord Provost decides that no one shall pay for the license; Bobby is to have the freedom of the city--at liberty to go where he pleases, including Old Jock's grave in Greyfriars' ... +


A hundred years ago in the Lammermuir Hills near Edinburgh, a little Skye terrier called Bobby is the devoted pet of Old Jock, a poor shepherd. When Jock loses his job because he is too old and infirm to work, he goes to Edinburgh, followed by the faithful Bobby. Before long the old man dies of pneumonia in a wretched lodging house and is laid to rest in Greyfriars' Kirkyard. Following Jock's death, Bobby spends his days begging food from Mr. Traill, the kindly owner of an eatinghouse, and playing with the local poor children. But by night the little animal avoids the crotchety caretaker of the churchyard, Mr. Brown, and keeps a vigil on Old Jock's grave. Eventually Bobby's charm wins over the caretaker and his wife, as well as most of the townspeople. Consequently, when the question of the dog's not having a license is brought to court, both Mr. Traill and Mrs. Brown insist upon paying for it. However, when the Edinburgh waifs also burst into court with the necessary funds, the Lord Provost decides that no one shall pay for the license; Bobby is to have the freedom of the city--at liberty to go where he pleases, including Old Jock's grave in Greyfriars' Kirkyard. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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