Beau Geste (1966)

104 mins | Adventure | 1966

Director:

Douglas Heyes

Writer:

Douglas Heyes

Producer:

Walter Seltzer

Cinematographer:

Bud Thackery

Production Designers:

Alexander Golitzen, Henry Bumstead

Production Company:

Universal Pictures
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HISTORY

Previously filmed by Paramount Pictures in 1926 and ... More Less

Previously filmed by Paramount Pictures in 1926 and 1939. More Less

CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
2nd unit dir
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
In charge of prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
COSTUMES
MUSIC
VISUAL EFFECTS
Matte supv
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Unit prod mgr
Dial coach
STAND INS
Stunt coord
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Beau Geste by Percival Christopher Wren (New York, 1925).
SONGS
"Beau Geste March," words and music by Hal Hopper.
COMPOSER
DETAILS
Release Date:
1966
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 7 September: July 1966
Copyright Claimant:
Universal Pictures
Copyright Date:
3 September 1966
Copyright Number:
LP35382
Physical Properties:
Sound
Westrex
Color
Technicolor
Widescreen/ratio
Techniscope
Duration(in mins):
104
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In 1906, young Beau Graves takes the blame for a crime committed by his business partner and leaves his home in the United States to join the French Foreign Legion. He is sent to Fort Zinderneuf in the Arabian Desert where he immediately runs afoul of the brutal and sadistic Sergeant-Major Dagineau, who suspects Beau of sending him an unsigned threatening letter. Beau wins the admiration of the other men, however, when he stands up to Dagineau. He also wins the friendship of the weak and drunken commander, Lieutenant De Ruse, who nicknames him "Geste" upon learning that Beau's sacrifice at home was unnecessary since his partner confessed and committed suicide shortly after Beau's departure for the Legion. Later, Beau is joined by his devoted brother John, and Dagineau becomes more convinced than ever that Beau plans to murder him. Lieutenant De Ruse is wounded by an Arab, and before dying he confesses to Beau that it was he who wrote the anonymous letter in the hope that fear might make Dagineau more humane. Dagineau, driven to the point of near-madness by the prospect of sudden death, subjects his men to torturous desert marches and cruel punishments. As the Arabs prepare for a massive assault, Beau manages to quell a mass mutiny among the men. In the subsequent attack, the legionnaires are killed off one by one until only Beau and Dagineau remain. A death struggle between the two men ensues, and Beau is found alive when a relief column arrives at the ... +


In 1906, young Beau Graves takes the blame for a crime committed by his business partner and leaves his home in the United States to join the French Foreign Legion. He is sent to Fort Zinderneuf in the Arabian Desert where he immediately runs afoul of the brutal and sadistic Sergeant-Major Dagineau, who suspects Beau of sending him an unsigned threatening letter. Beau wins the admiration of the other men, however, when he stands up to Dagineau. He also wins the friendship of the weak and drunken commander, Lieutenant De Ruse, who nicknames him "Geste" upon learning that Beau's sacrifice at home was unnecessary since his partner confessed and committed suicide shortly after Beau's departure for the Legion. Later, Beau is joined by his devoted brother John, and Dagineau becomes more convinced than ever that Beau plans to murder him. Lieutenant De Ruse is wounded by an Arab, and before dying he confesses to Beau that it was he who wrote the anonymous letter in the hope that fear might make Dagineau more humane. Dagineau, driven to the point of near-madness by the prospect of sudden death, subjects his men to torturous desert marches and cruel punishments. As the Arabs prepare for a massive assault, Beau manages to quell a mass mutiny among the men. In the subsequent attack, the legionnaires are killed off one by one until only Beau and Dagineau remain. A death struggle between the two men ensues, and Beau is found alive when a relief column arrives at the fort. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.