Mystery Man (1944)

58 mins | Western | 31 May 1944

Director:

George Archainbaud

Producer:

Harry Sherman

Cinematographer:

Russell Harlan

Editor:

Fred W. Berger

Production Designer:

Ralph Berger

Production Company:

Harry Sherman Productions
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HISTORY

The working title of this film was Thundering Hoofs . According to a HR news item, locations were filmed at Lone Pine and Kernville, CA. Modern sources add Bill Hunter, Art Mix, Hank Bell, Bob Baker and George Morrell to the cast. For additional information on the series, please consult the Series Index and see the entry for Hop-Along Cassidy in AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 ; ... More Less

The working title of this film was Thundering Hoofs . According to a HR news item, locations were filmed at Lone Pine and Kernville, CA. Modern sources add Bill Hunter, Art Mix, Hank Bell, Bob Baker and George Morrell to the cast. For additional information on the series, please consult the Series Index and see the entry for Hop-Along Cassidy in AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 ; F3.1990. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
24 Jun 1944.
---
Daily Variety
21 Jul 44
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Jul 43
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Jul 43
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
30 Jul 43
p. 21.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Jul 44
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
1 Jul 44
p. 1969.
Variety
31 May 44
p. 20.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Supv ed
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
Ward
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on characters created by Clarence E. Mulford.
SONGS
"Tie a Saddle String Around Your Troubles," words and music by Ozie Waters and Forrest Johnson.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Thundering Hoofs
Release Date:
31 May 1944
Premiere Information:
New York opening: week of 23 May 1944
Production Date:
25 July--late July 1943
Copyright Claimant:
United Artists Productions, Inc.
Copyright Date:
31 May 1944
Copyright Number:
LP12710
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
58
Length(in feet):
5,229
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Although a gang of desperadoes has been terrorizing the territory by looting trains and robbing banks, no one can identify their leader, Bud Trilling. While on a cattle drive to the Circle J ranch in Texas, Hopalong Cassidy, California Carlson, Jimmy Rogers and the other ranch hands of the Bar 20, stop at a small trail town and unwittingly foil a bank robbery being committed by the Trilling gang. In the hail of gunfire, Diane Newhall, a passenger on the Texas-bound stage, saves Jimmy from an outlaw's bullet. When Jimmy thanks her for saving his life, Diane tells him that her father is the sheriff of a town nearby the Circle J. After jailing the outlaws, the town marshal questions them about their leader, but they refuse to cooperate. The elusive Trilling, posing as a dude, congratulates the sheriff on his conquest and then sneaks a gun through the cell bars, allowing his gang to escape. After breaking his men out of jail, Trilling decides exact revenge on Hoppy by stealing the Bar 20 herd. That evening, as Hoppy and the cowhands make camp, Trilling's men spook their horses. After the horses run away, Trilling's gang swoops down from the hills and rides off with the Bar 20 cattle. Hoppy and the men of the Bar 20 soon recapture their steeds and track down the rustlers and reclaim their cattle. Undaunted, Trilling dons a sheriff's badge and, posing as a lawman, rides to Hoppy's camp under the pretense of questioning him about the outlaws. Once inside the camp, Trilling pulls his gun, ties up Hoppy and the others and steals his ... +


Although a gang of desperadoes has been terrorizing the territory by looting trains and robbing banks, no one can identify their leader, Bud Trilling. While on a cattle drive to the Circle J ranch in Texas, Hopalong Cassidy, California Carlson, Jimmy Rogers and the other ranch hands of the Bar 20, stop at a small trail town and unwittingly foil a bank robbery being committed by the Trilling gang. In the hail of gunfire, Diane Newhall, a passenger on the Texas-bound stage, saves Jimmy from an outlaw's bullet. When Jimmy thanks her for saving his life, Diane tells him that her father is the sheriff of a town nearby the Circle J. After jailing the outlaws, the town marshal questions them about their leader, but they refuse to cooperate. The elusive Trilling, posing as a dude, congratulates the sheriff on his conquest and then sneaks a gun through the cell bars, allowing his gang to escape. After breaking his men out of jail, Trilling decides exact revenge on Hoppy by stealing the Bar 20 herd. That evening, as Hoppy and the cowhands make camp, Trilling's men spook their horses. After the horses run away, Trilling's gang swoops down from the hills and rides off with the Bar 20 cattle. Hoppy and the men of the Bar 20 soon recapture their steeds and track down the rustlers and reclaim their cattle. Undaunted, Trilling dons a sheriff's badge and, posing as a lawman, rides to Hoppy's camp under the pretense of questioning him about the outlaws. Once inside the camp, Trilling pulls his gun, ties up Hoppy and the others and steals his papers, planning to pose as Hoppy and sell the herd to the Bar J. After Trilling and his gang ride off with the cattle, Hoppy cuts his bonds on a sharp rock, overpowers his guard and frees his men. Red, one of Trilling's gang, observes the escape and hurries to warn his boss. As Hoppy follows Trilling's trail to the Bar J, California's horse goes lame, causing him to lag behind. Upon arriving in town, Trilling, posing as Hoppy, informs Sheriff Sam Newhall that Trilling's gang is following him, and the sheriff instructs Trilling to continue to the Bar J while he and his posse intercept the outlaws. When Hoppy arrives in town, the sheriff arrests him as Trilling and jails him. Soon after, Diane comes to her father's office, and although she vouches for Jimmy, her father refuses to believe Hoppy's story. When California and his lame horse arrive in town, California tries to free his friends, but is captured by the sheriff's deputies and jailed, too. After the sheriff leaves his office, Diane sends his deputies on a wild goose chase, frees Hoppy and the others and shows them a shortcut to the Circle J. Trilling is completing the transaction for the sale of the cattle with the owner of the Circle J, when Hoppy and his boys gallop up and drive the outlaws into Fox Canyon. In a blistering shootout, Trilling is killed and his gang captured. After the sheriff apologizes to Hoppy for misjudging him, Jimmy promises to return to Texas to see Diane again. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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