San Fernando Valley (1944)

74 mins | Western | 15 September 1944

Director:

John English

Cinematographer:

Bill Bradford

Editor:

Ralph Dixon

Production Designer:

Gano Chittenden

Production Company:

Republic Pictures Corp.
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HISTORY

The print viewed was missing approximately twenty minutes. According to a 10 May 1944 HR news item, associate producer Eddy White originally intended to "use all the Republic western stars in San Fernando Valley , to come to the aid of Roy Rogers when he finally has the heavies cornered." The stars mentioned were Bob Livingston , Don "Red" Barry , Smiley Burnette, Sunset Carson, Allan Lane and Wild Bill Elliott, but they do not appear in the completed picture. HR production charts indicate that Ann Gillis was originally cast as "Betty Lou Kenyon," but was replaced in the role by Jean Porter after production began. Although the Var review includes Alyce Walker in the list of songwriters contributing to the film, the extent of her contribution has not been determined. As noted in the HR review, "the title [of the film] is merely the name of the [Roy Rogers] Hit Parade song which is sung frequently and pleasantly. None of the action takes place in San Fernando Valley ... More Less

The print viewed was missing approximately twenty minutes. According to a 10 May 1944 HR news item, associate producer Eddy White originally intended to "use all the Republic western stars in San Fernando Valley , to come to the aid of Roy Rogers when he finally has the heavies cornered." The stars mentioned were Bob Livingston , Don "Red" Barry , Smiley Burnette, Sunset Carson, Allan Lane and Wild Bill Elliott, but they do not appear in the completed picture. HR production charts indicate that Ann Gillis was originally cast as "Betty Lou Kenyon," but was replaced in the role by Jean Porter after production began. Although the Var review includes Alyce Walker in the list of songwriters contributing to the film, the extent of her contribution has not been determined. As noted in the HR review, "the title [of the film] is merely the name of the [Roy Rogers] Hit Parade song which is sung frequently and pleasantly. None of the action takes place in San Fernando Valley [CA]." More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
2 Sep 1944.
---
Daily Variety
23 Aug 44
p. 3.
Film Daily
28 Aug 44
p. 13.
Hollywood Reporter
10 May 44
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
17 May 44
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
19 May 44
p. 15.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Jun 44
p. 13.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Aug 44
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
1 Jul 44
p. 1971
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
26 Aug 44
p. 2066.
Variety
30 Aug 44
p. 10.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
2d unit dir
Asst dir
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Orig scr, Orig scr
Orig scr, Orig scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOUND
DANCE
Dance dir
SOURCES
SONGS
"San Fernando Valley," music and lyrics by Gordon Jenkins
"Over the Rainbow," music and lyrics by Ken Carson
"Days of '49" and "They Went Thataway," music and lyrics by Tim Spencer
+
SONGS
"San Fernando Valley," music and lyrics by Gordon Jenkins
"Over the Rainbow," music and lyrics by Ken Carson
"Days of '49" and "They Went Thataway," music and lyrics by Tim Spencer
"My Hobby Is Love" and "Sweeter Than You," music and lyrics by Charles Henderson
"I Drottled a Drit Drit," music and lyrics by William Lava.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
15 September 1944
Production Date:
22 May--late June 1944
Copyright Claimant:
Republic Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
17 August 1944
Copyright Number:
LP12830
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
74
Length(in feet):
6,685
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
PCA No:
10237
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

Rancher John "Cyclone" Kenyon and his practical granddaughter Dale fume over the behavior of Dale's younger sister Betty Lou, an irresponsible teenager who does nothing but sing and pursue cowboys. When the Kenyon ranch hands, including Bob and a group of sometime entertainers The Sons of the Pioneers and the shifty Matt and Dusty, neglect their chores to sing with Betty Lou, Dale fires them and decides to hire hands who will not be distracted by her precocious sister. To achieve her goal, Dale seeks workers at the Pendleford Days of '49 Celebration, and there accidentally bumps Roy Rogers with her car. Roy, a ranch owner from the San Fernando Valley, has come to the carnival in search of his pal Keno, who ran off to work in a sideshow game. Roy has won all of Keno's money, which he promises to return when they go back home. Roy is attracted to Dale and plays up a slight injury he incurred, but the ruckus they cause prompts the sheriff to lock them in the parade's fake jail. Roy makes Dale promise to attend that evening's dance with him, but when he goes to the fake address that she gave, Matt and Dusty, who had overheard their conversation, appear in masks and knock Roy unconscious before robbing him. The next day, Cyclone is dismayed by the toughness of the women ranch hands hired by Dale, especially forewoman Hattie O'Toole. Needing some male allies, Cyclone hires Roy and Keno, who have come to the ranch to learn if Dale deliberately set Roy up to be robbed. Meanwhile, Betty Lou goes to town to ... +


Rancher John "Cyclone" Kenyon and his practical granddaughter Dale fume over the behavior of Dale's younger sister Betty Lou, an irresponsible teenager who does nothing but sing and pursue cowboys. When the Kenyon ranch hands, including Bob and a group of sometime entertainers The Sons of the Pioneers and the shifty Matt and Dusty, neglect their chores to sing with Betty Lou, Dale fires them and decides to hire hands who will not be distracted by her precocious sister. To achieve her goal, Dale seeks workers at the Pendleford Days of '49 Celebration, and there accidentally bumps Roy Rogers with her car. Roy, a ranch owner from the San Fernando Valley, has come to the carnival in search of his pal Keno, who ran off to work in a sideshow game. Roy has won all of Keno's money, which he promises to return when they go back home. Roy is attracted to Dale and plays up a slight injury he incurred, but the ruckus they cause prompts the sheriff to lock them in the parade's fake jail. Roy makes Dale promise to attend that evening's dance with him, but when he goes to the fake address that she gave, Matt and Dusty, who had overheard their conversation, appear in masks and knock Roy unconscious before robbing him. The next day, Cyclone is dismayed by the toughness of the women ranch hands hired by Dale, especially forewoman Hattie O'Toole. Needing some male allies, Cyclone hires Roy and Keno, who have come to the ranch to learn if Dale deliberately set Roy up to be robbed. Meanwhile, Betty Lou goes to town to ask Bob and the other fired hands to pretend to steal the Kenyon horses, and then when the women hands cannot retrieve them, Bob's men will "find" and return the horses, and a grateful Dale will rehire the men. Bob immediately demurs, but Matt and Dusty, who intend to steal the horses for real, talk him and the others into going along with the ruse. Back at the ranch, Dale realizes that Betty Lou has developed a crush on the handsome Roy, and asks him to pretend to court someone else to discourage her. Roy suggests that he court Dale, and she reluctantly agrees, but later that evening, she admits to Roy that she does care for him. That night, some of the hands serenade the cowgirls to distract them while Matt and Dusty steal the herd. The next day, Roy discovers evidence that Betty Lou tampered with his and Keno's saddles in order to prevent them from following the rustlers, and also deduces that Willie the dog would have barked if the culprits had been strangers. While Roy confronts Betty Lou, Matt and Dusty, who have hidden the horses with the aid of their cohort, pretend to have been robbed for real, and Cyclone and the sheriff hold Bob and the other hands responsible. Roy is suspicious, however, as Matt's and Dusty's own mounts were not taken, and when he confronts them, he is held at gunpoint by their accomplice. The bandits then attempt to escape, but with the help of his horse Trigger, Roy rounds up the culprits and also retrieves the money that Matt and Dusty stole from him. Later, Dale and Cyclone rehire the men while keeping on the cowgirls to manage the returned herd. All ends well as Bob and the other hands marry their new co-workers, Cyclone and Hattie team up, and Roy and Dale are married before driving off for the San Fernando Valley. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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