The Corn Is Green (1945)

114 or 116 mins | Drama | 1945

Director:

Irving Rapper

Producer:

Jack Chertok

Cinematographer:

Sol Polito

Production Designer:

Carl Jules Weyl

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Full page view
HISTORY

Rhys Williams, Rosalind Ivan, Mildred Dunnock and Gene Moss, members of the Broadway cast of Emlyn Williams' play, reprised their roles for this film. Ethel Barrymore portrayed "Moffat" in the Broadway production. According to a 30 Jul 1944 NYT news item, John Dall replaced Richard Warring when the latter was drafted. HR news items add the following information about the production: Ida Lupino was to star in the film with Bette Davis. Warner Bros. paid $135,000 for the rights to the play and agreed not to release a filmed version until Nov 1943. Production reports included in the Warner Bros. Collection at the USC Cinema-Television Library note that the film was shot in continuity in 72 days. John Dall and Joan Lorring, who made their motion picture debuts in the film, were nominated for Academy Awards for Best Supporting Actor and Best Supporting Actress, respectively. Olivia De Havilland starred with Richard Basehart in a 12 Jun 1950 Lux Radio Theatre broadcast of the story. It was performed again on 17 May 1954. Williams' play was remade for television in 1979, starring Katharine Hepburn and directed by George ... More Less

Rhys Williams, Rosalind Ivan, Mildred Dunnock and Gene Moss, members of the Broadway cast of Emlyn Williams' play, reprised their roles for this film. Ethel Barrymore portrayed "Moffat" in the Broadway production. According to a 30 Jul 1944 NYT news item, John Dall replaced Richard Warring when the latter was drafted. HR news items add the following information about the production: Ida Lupino was to star in the film with Bette Davis. Warner Bros. paid $135,000 for the rights to the play and agreed not to release a filmed version until Nov 1943. Production reports included in the Warner Bros. Collection at the USC Cinema-Television Library note that the film was shot in continuity in 72 days. John Dall and Joan Lorring, who made their motion picture debuts in the film, were nominated for Academy Awards for Best Supporting Actor and Best Supporting Actress, respectively. Olivia De Havilland starred with Richard Basehart in a 12 Jun 1950 Lux Radio Theatre broadcast of the story. It was performed again on 17 May 1954. Williams' play was remade for television in 1979, starring Katharine Hepburn and directed by George Cukor. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
7 Apr 1945.
---
Daily Variety
29 Mar 45
pp. 3, 8
Film Daily
29 Mar 45
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Apr 41
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Apr 41
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Mar 45
p. 42
Hollywood Reporter
29 Mar 45
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Apr 45
p. 8.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
22 Jul 44
p. 2007.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
31 Mar 45
p. 2381.
New York Times
30 Jul 1944.
---
New York Times
30 Mar 45
p. 18.
Variety
4 Apr 45
p. 10.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Warner Bros.--First National Picture
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Asst cam
Stills
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Matte paintings
MUSIC
Orch arr
Vocal arr
SOUND
Re-rec and eff mixer
Re-rec and eff mixer
Mus mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Makeup
Makeup
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit mgr
Scr clerk
Bestboy
Research dir
Research asst
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play The Corn Is Green by Emlyn Williams, as produced by Herman Shumlin (London, 20 Sep 1938).
SONGS
"Land of My Fathers" (Welsh national anthem)
"Captain Morgan," "The Yellow Cream," "There's My Sweetheart," "Watching the Wheat," "Comrades in Arms," "March of the Men of Harlech," "Hob I Deri Dando," "New Year's Night" and "Lili Long," traditional Welsh folk songs.
DETAILS
Premiere Information:
World premiere in New York: 23 March 1945
Production Date:
20 June--13 September 1944
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
21 June 1945
Copyright Number:
LP13395
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
114 or 116
Length(in feet):
10,219
Country:
United States
PCA No:
9366
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In 1895, the inhabitants of Glansarno, a small village in the Welsh countryside, are taken aback when they learn that L. C. Moffat, their newest neighbor, is a forty-year-old English woman named Lily Cristobel, not a man as her Master of Arts degree had led them to expect. The other members of Moffat's household are her housekeeper, Mrs. Watty, a reformed thief, and Mrs. Watty's daughter Bessie. Despite the opposition of the village squire, Moffat intends to establish a school for the children who work in the nearby coal mines and drafts Miss Ronberry, a middle-aged woman, and Mr. Jones, a minister, to help her. She encounters stiff opposition to her plans, first from the mine owners, including the Squire, who refuse to release the boys from their long hours in the mines, and then from the owner of the barn she had planned to use for a schoolhouse. Discouraged, Moffat is about to give up her plans, when she reads an essay written by Morgan Evans, one of the boys, and is so moved by his rough poetry that she decides to hold classes in her house. Although many villagers attend the classes, Moffat focuses her efforts on Morgan. After a while, she believes that Morgan is smart enough to attend Oxford. Using flattery, she makes friends with the Squire and then asks him to vouch for Morgan to enable him to apply for a scholarship to the university. In the meantime, Morgan's friends make fun of his efforts to become educated. One day, feeling out of place, a drunken Morgan tells Moffat that he intends to return to the ... +


In 1895, the inhabitants of Glansarno, a small village in the Welsh countryside, are taken aback when they learn that L. C. Moffat, their newest neighbor, is a forty-year-old English woman named Lily Cristobel, not a man as her Master of Arts degree had led them to expect. The other members of Moffat's household are her housekeeper, Mrs. Watty, a reformed thief, and Mrs. Watty's daughter Bessie. Despite the opposition of the village squire, Moffat intends to establish a school for the children who work in the nearby coal mines and drafts Miss Ronberry, a middle-aged woman, and Mr. Jones, a minister, to help her. She encounters stiff opposition to her plans, first from the mine owners, including the Squire, who refuse to release the boys from their long hours in the mines, and then from the owner of the barn she had planned to use for a schoolhouse. Discouraged, Moffat is about to give up her plans, when she reads an essay written by Morgan Evans, one of the boys, and is so moved by his rough poetry that she decides to hold classes in her house. Although many villagers attend the classes, Moffat focuses her efforts on Morgan. After a while, she believes that Morgan is smart enough to attend Oxford. Using flattery, she makes friends with the Squire and then asks him to vouch for Morgan to enable him to apply for a scholarship to the university. In the meantime, Morgan's friends make fun of his efforts to become educated. One day, feeling out of place, a drunken Morgan tells Moffat that he intends to return to the mines. She scolds him, but concedes that the decision to continue is his. Confused, Morgan leaves the house and outside, encounters Bessie. She flirts with him, taking his side against Moffat, and ends by seducing him. Morgan goes back to the mines, but eventually, decides to try for Oxford. Moffat coaches him steadily for the examination, but on the morning of the test, Bessie, who has been sent away into service, returns and tells Moffat that she is pregnant with Morgan's child. Moffat keeps this news a secret from Morgan. After the examination, Morgan tells Moffat how much he now wants to attend the university. While Morgan celebrates with Moffat, the Squire, Miss Ronberry, Mr. Jones and Mrs. Watty, Bessie arrives at the house. Mr. Jones spots her and, on a pretext, sends Morgan to the kitchen. Bessie then tells the assembled group about her pregnancy and Mr. Jones offers to marry her, but she laughs in his face, saying that she already has a man who will marry her, provided the child does not come with her. Mrs. Watty then persuades Moffat to adopt the child. When Morgan learns that he is to be a father, however, he insists on marrying Bessie, despite Moffat's attempts to dissuade him. After a telegram arrives, announcing that Morgan has won the scholarship, Moffat convinces him to attend the school and forbids him to see her again as she will be caring for his child. Morgan agrees to her terms and leaves her house for the last time to celebrate with the other villagers. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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