Our Vines Have Tender Grapes (1945)

105 mins | Drama | September 1945

Director:

Roy Rowland

Writer:

Dalton Trumbo

Producer:

Robert Sisk

Cinematographer:

Robert Surtees

Production Designers:

Cedric Gibbons, Edward Carfagno

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Full page view
HISTORY

The title of the film was taken from the Song of Solomon . II. 15: "Take us the foxes, the little foxes that spoil the vines; For our vines have tender grapes." Some HR production charts list Connie Gilchrist in the cast, but she did not appear in the final film. Portions of the film were shot at the Rowland V. Lee Ranch in the San Fernando Valley of CA. In Jul 1946, according to a HR news item, Mrs. Selma Martin, the estranged wife of author George Victor Martin, and Arnold Hansen, a Tacoma, WA, salesman, filed a $25,000 lawsuit against M-G-M, claiming that the film was based on their lives, and that the picture caused them to suffer "undue public attention, mental anguish and humiliation." The outcome of the suit is not known. Margaret O'Brien and Frances Gifford recreated their roles for a Lux Radio Theatre version of the story, which was broadcast on 2 Sep ... More Less

The title of the film was taken from the Song of Solomon . II. 15: "Take us the foxes, the little foxes that spoil the vines; For our vines have tender grapes." Some HR production charts list Connie Gilchrist in the cast, but she did not appear in the final film. Portions of the film were shot at the Rowland V. Lee Ranch in the San Fernando Valley of CA. In Jul 1946, according to a HR news item, Mrs. Selma Martin, the estranged wife of author George Victor Martin, and Arnold Hansen, a Tacoma, WA, salesman, filed a $25,000 lawsuit against M-G-M, claiming that the film was based on their lives, and that the picture caused them to suffer "undue public attention, mental anguish and humiliation." The outcome of the suit is not known. Margaret O'Brien and Frances Gifford recreated their roles for a Lux Radio Theatre version of the story, which was broadcast on 2 Sep 1946. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
21 Jul 1945.
---
Daily Variety
20 Jul 45
p. 3.
Film Daily
20 Jul 1945.
---
Hollywood Reporter
6 Oct 44
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Oct 44
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Nov 44
p. 16.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Dec 44
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Dec 44
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Apr 45
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Jul 45
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Sep 45
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Jul 46
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
16 Dec 44
p. 2230.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
21 Jul 45
p. 2553.
New York Times
7 Sep 45
p. 21.
Variety
18 Jul 45
p. 34.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Assoc
COSTUMES
Cost supv
Assoc
MUSIC
Mus score
SOUND
Rec dir
Unit mixer
Re-rec and eff mixer
Re-rec and eff mixer
Re-rec and eff mixer
Re-rec and eff mixer
Re-rec and eff mixer
Re-rec and eff mixer
Mus mixer
Mus mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Matte paintings
Matte paintings, cam
MAKEUP
Makeup created by
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit mgr
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel For Our Vines Have Tender Grapes by George Victor Martin (New York, 1940).
DETAILS
Release Date:
September 1945
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 6 September 1945
Production Date:
16 October--27 December 1944
added scenes began 9 April 1945
Copyright Claimant:
Loew's Inc.
Copyright Date:
1 September 1945
Copyright Number:
LP13461
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
105
Length(in feet):
9,491
Country:
United States
PCA No:
10713
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

While walking down a road in Fuller Junction, Wisconsin, a town settled by Norwegian immigrants, seven-year-old Selma Jacobson tries to impress her five-year-old cousin, Arnold Hanson, by throwing a rock at a squirrel. Much to Selma's dismay, the rock hits the squirrel and kills it. While Selma tearfully mourns the death of the squirrel, Ingeborg Jensen, a young, emotionally frail Norwegian woman, approaches Selma and Arnold and offers them her friendship. Ingeborg's visit is interrupted, however, by her strict father Kurt, who demands that she return to her chores. Later, while driving Arnold and Selma home, Nels Halverson, the editor of the local newspaper, stops to greet Viola Johnson, the new schoolteacher, who has just arrived from Milwaukee. Viola accepts a ride from Nels, and when asked about her impression of Fuller Junction, she complains that the town is too small for her. She also tells Nels that she is working on her doctorate in education, and that she was sent to Fuller Junction because she is of Norwegian descent and speaks Norwegian. Determined to change her impression of Fuller Junction, Nels offers to show Viola some of the town's hidden charms. When Selma returns home, she reports the squirrel incident to her devoted father Martinius, who tries to help his daughter forget about it by giving her a new calf. Viola, meanwhile, befriends Ingeborg and encourages her to enroll in school. Her efforts are thwarted, however, when Kurt refuses to allow Ingeborg to leave the farm. One day, Martinius punishes Selma for selfishly refusing to share her rollerskates with Arnold, and sends her to bed without dinner. Later that night, Martinius, feeling ... +


While walking down a road in Fuller Junction, Wisconsin, a town settled by Norwegian immigrants, seven-year-old Selma Jacobson tries to impress her five-year-old cousin, Arnold Hanson, by throwing a rock at a squirrel. Much to Selma's dismay, the rock hits the squirrel and kills it. While Selma tearfully mourns the death of the squirrel, Ingeborg Jensen, a young, emotionally frail Norwegian woman, approaches Selma and Arnold and offers them her friendship. Ingeborg's visit is interrupted, however, by her strict father Kurt, who demands that she return to her chores. Later, while driving Arnold and Selma home, Nels Halverson, the editor of the local newspaper, stops to greet Viola Johnson, the new schoolteacher, who has just arrived from Milwaukee. Viola accepts a ride from Nels, and when asked about her impression of Fuller Junction, she complains that the town is too small for her. She also tells Nels that she is working on her doctorate in education, and that she was sent to Fuller Junction because she is of Norwegian descent and speaks Norwegian. Determined to change her impression of Fuller Junction, Nels offers to show Viola some of the town's hidden charms. When Selma returns home, she reports the squirrel incident to her devoted father Martinius, who tries to help his daughter forget about it by giving her a new calf. Viola, meanwhile, befriends Ingeborg and encourages her to enroll in school. Her efforts are thwarted, however, when Kurt refuses to allow Ingeborg to leave the farm. One day, Martinius punishes Selma for selfishly refusing to share her rollerskates with Arnold, and sends her to bed without dinner. Later that night, Martinius, feeling guilty about punishing Selma, takes her to see a circus troupe that is passing through town. A short time later, Ingeborg dies unexpectedly, and her death saddens Viola, the only person in town who made an effort to understand her. A romance eventually develops between Nels and Viola, but Viola resists further intimacy because she plans to return to Milwaukee. On Christmas Day, at her church, Selma gives a moving recitation of the story of the Nativity, and afterward presents her father with a brand new knife. Months later, when springtime floodwaters engulf the town, Selma and Arnold play in an old bathtub, which they use as a makeshift rowboat. The two quickly lose control of the tub, however, and are carried away by a raging current. The near tragedy ends happily, however, when Arnold and Selma are rescued by some of the townspeople. One night, during a thunderstorm, Bjorn Bjornson's barn catches fire and is destroyed. At a church service, Nels solicits donations to help the Bjornsons rebuild their barn. The townspeople drop only a few coins into collection box until Selma shames everyone by generously donating her calf. Her donation inspires the townspeople to give more money, and prompts Viola to reconsider her harsh judgment of the town. Realizing that she has fallen in love with both the town and Nels, Viola decides to stay in Fuller Junction. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.