The Cowboy and the Senorita (1944)

77-78 mins | Western | 12 May 1944

Director:

Joseph I. Kane

Writer:

Gordon Kahn

Cinematographer:

Reggie Lanning

Editor:

Tony Martinelli

Production Designer:

Fred Ritter

Production Company:

Republic Pictures Corp.
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HISTORY

Most of the songs were cut out of the viewed print. Modern sources include Bob Wilke and Wally West in the ... More Less

Most of the songs were cut out of the viewed print. Modern sources include Bob Wilke and Wally West in the cast. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
8 Apr 1944.
---
Daily Variety
27 Mar 44
p. 3.
Film Daily
5 Apr 44
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Dec 44
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Jan 44
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Feb 44
p. 16.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Mar 44
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
3 Feb 44
p. 1747.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
1 Apr 44
p. 1825.
Variety
5 Apr 44
p. 14.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Orig story
PHOTOGRAPHY
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOUND
DANCE
Dance dir
SOURCES
SONGS
"Cowboy and the Senorita," "What'll I Use for Money" and "The Enchilada Man," music and lyrics by Ned Washington and Phil Ohman
"Bunk House Bugle Boy," music and lyrics by Tim Spencer and Bob Nolan
"Besame mucho," music and lyrics by Consuelo Velázquez
+
SONGS
"Cowboy and the Senorita," "What'll I Use for Money" and "The Enchilada Man," music and lyrics by Ned Washington and Phil Ohman
"Bunk House Bugle Boy," music and lyrics by Tim Spencer and Bob Nolan
"Besame mucho," music and lyrics by Consuelo Velázquez
"She Wore a Yellow Ribbon," traditional.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
12 May 1944
Production Date:
5 January--late January 1944
addl mus seq early February 1944
Copyright Claimant:
Republic Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
20 March 1944
Copyright Number:
LP12559
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
77-78
Length(in feet):
7,008
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
PCA No:
9965
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

After a spate of bad luck, prospectors Roy Rogers and Teddy Bear ride to the town of Bonanza, where they hope to find jobs. On the way, Roy and Teddy Bear find a gold charm bracelet lying by the roadside. The bracelet was dropped by teenager Chip Williams, who has run away from the ranch she lives at with her stepsister, Ysobel Martinez. When Roy and Teddy Bear arrive at the Bonanza Club, owned by local bigwig Craig Allen, they learn about Chip's disappearance and volunteer to join the search. When Chip's bracelet is found in Teddy Bear's possession, however, the searchers conclude that he and Roy have kidnapped the youngster. Allen and his henchman, Ferguson, take Roy and Teddy Bear to Sheriff Gilbert at Ysobel's ranch. Ysobel believes their story though and does not hinder them when they escape from their captors. Later that evening, the two fugitives finally meet Chip when she helps herself to some of their dinner, and she explains that she ran away because Ysobel is about to sell her late father's supposedly worthless gold mine to Allen. Chip's father told her that he had buried a treasure for her there, and she is determined to find it before Allen takes possession of the mine. When Roy, Teddy Bear and Chip go to the mine to begin Chip's search, they are apprehended by Gilbert's posse, and an angry Ysobel reprimands Chip for running away. She also offers jobs to Roy and Teddy Bear to make up for the false kidnapping accusations, and soon Roy convinces Chip to tell Ysobel about the treasure box. Ysobel gently scoffs ... +


After a spate of bad luck, prospectors Roy Rogers and Teddy Bear ride to the town of Bonanza, where they hope to find jobs. On the way, Roy and Teddy Bear find a gold charm bracelet lying by the roadside. The bracelet was dropped by teenager Chip Williams, who has run away from the ranch she lives at with her stepsister, Ysobel Martinez. When Roy and Teddy Bear arrive at the Bonanza Club, owned by local bigwig Craig Allen, they learn about Chip's disappearance and volunteer to join the search. When Chip's bracelet is found in Teddy Bear's possession, however, the searchers conclude that he and Roy have kidnapped the youngster. Allen and his henchman, Ferguson, take Roy and Teddy Bear to Sheriff Gilbert at Ysobel's ranch. Ysobel believes their story though and does not hinder them when they escape from their captors. Later that evening, the two fugitives finally meet Chip when she helps herself to some of their dinner, and she explains that she ran away because Ysobel is about to sell her late father's supposedly worthless gold mine to Allen. Chip's father told her that he had buried a treasure for her there, and she is determined to find it before Allen takes possession of the mine. When Roy, Teddy Bear and Chip go to the mine to begin Chip's search, they are apprehended by Gilbert's posse, and an angry Ysobel reprimands Chip for running away. She also offers jobs to Roy and Teddy Bear to make up for the false kidnapping accusations, and soon Roy convinces Chip to tell Ysobel about the treasure box. Ysobel gently scoffs at the idea but agrees to let Chip search for it. Before they leave, however, Ysobel tells Allen about the treasure, unaware that he is trying to swindle her out of the mine in order to get the box for himself. Allen and Ferguson reach the mine before Roy and the others, but Ferguson bluffs his way through the situation by claiming that they have the right to begin digging before the sale is finalized. Roy's suspicions are heightened, but Chip is happy when they find the box, which contains a letter to be opened on her sixteenth birthday, which is that day. In the evening, Ysobel throws a birthday fiesta for Chip, after which Chip reads the letter. It tells her that the treasure is her bracelet, the surface of which must be scratched to reveal its secret. Chip is disappointed, but Roy decides to get the bracelet from Allen's office, where it was being held as evidence in the alleged kidnapping. After Roy takes the bracelet, Allen tells Ysobel and Chip that he stole both it and money from the safe. The posse looks for Roy and Teddy Bear, who are hiding while attempting to solve the riddle hidden under the bracelet's surface. Ysobel's ranch hands agree to help Roy for Chip's sake, and they examine the mine again using the riddle's instructions. During their search, the men find a rich vein of gold ore and dig up three wagonloads of it to take to the courthouse to prove Chip's claim before Allen's deed is finalized. Despite being chased by the posse and Allen's men, Roy and the others make it just before Ysobel signs the papers. Allen and Ferguson are arrested for fraud, and soon after, Ysobel hosts a fiesta to celebrate Chip's riches. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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