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HISTORY

The film's title card reads, "Twentieth Century-Fox presents Rodgers and Hammerstein's State Fair ." According to HR news items, Mischa Auer was set for a "featured part," but he does not appear in the completed film. Other HR news items noted that Maureen O'Hara and Kathryn Grayson were considered for the picture, and that Janet Blair was tested for the part of "Emily," which was originally "inked" for Alice Faye. Although other HR news items include Marguerite Belle and Harvey Karels in the cast, their appearance in the completed film has not been confirmed. In Nov 1943, HR announced that Twentieth Century-Fox was contemplating hiring Agnes DeMille as the film's dance director. According to information in the Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department, located at the UCLA Arts--Special Collections Library, some sequences were shot on location at Russell Ranch, King Farm and Sherwood Forest, CA.
       According to information in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the AMPAS Library, the Breen Office rejected two scripts, dated 8 May 1944 and 16 Nov 1944, due to "the inescapable suggestion of an illicit sex affair between Emily and Wayne." During a conference between producer William Perlberg and PCA officials, it was agreed that "there would be no suggestion of any sex affair between Emily and Wayne from the reactions of either of these or from the father." The legal records reveal that the studio received written permission from Ronald Colman, Charles Boyer and Bing Crosby to include impersonations of their voices in the song "It Might as Well Be Spring." Modern sources state that Lou Ann Hogan was the singing ... More Less

The film's title card reads, "Twentieth Century-Fox presents Rodgers and Hammerstein's State Fair ." According to HR news items, Mischa Auer was set for a "featured part," but he does not appear in the completed film. Other HR news items noted that Maureen O'Hara and Kathryn Grayson were considered for the picture, and that Janet Blair was tested for the part of "Emily," which was originally "inked" for Alice Faye. Although other HR news items include Marguerite Belle and Harvey Karels in the cast, their appearance in the completed film has not been confirmed. In Nov 1943, HR announced that Twentieth Century-Fox was contemplating hiring Agnes DeMille as the film's dance director. According to information in the Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department, located at the UCLA Arts--Special Collections Library, some sequences were shot on location at Russell Ranch, King Farm and Sherwood Forest, CA.
       According to information in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the AMPAS Library, the Breen Office rejected two scripts, dated 8 May 1944 and 16 Nov 1944, due to "the inescapable suggestion of an illicit sex affair between Emily and Wayne." During a conference between producer William Perlberg and PCA officials, it was agreed that "there would be no suggestion of any sex affair between Emily and Wayne from the reactions of either of these or from the father." The legal records reveal that the studio received written permission from Ronald Colman, Charles Boyer and Bing Crosby to include impersonations of their voices in the song "It Might as Well Be Spring." Modern sources state that Lou Ann Hogan was the singing voice double for Jeanne Crain. The picture received an Academy Award nomination for Best Scoring of a Musical Picture, and Rodgers and Hammerstein were awarded an Oscar for Best Song for "It Might as Well Be Spring."
       Twentieth Century-Fox previously filmed a non-musical version of Phil Stong's novel in 1933, directed by Henry King and starring Will Rogers, Janet Gaynor and Lew Ayres. In 1962, the studio again remade State Fair as a musical featuring the original Rodgers and Hammerstein's songs, as well as additional songs by Rodgers. The 1962 film was directed by José Ferrer and starred Pat Boone, Ann-Margret and Alice Faye (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 ; F3.4304 and AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1961-70 ; F6.4688). On 24 Jun 1946, Dick Haymes, Jeanne Crain and Vivian Blaine reprised their roles for a Lux Radio Theatre broadcast of the story. The Hallmark Playhouse broadcast a radio presentation of the story on 26 Aug 1948. The 1945 film was broadcast on television under the title It Happened One Summer , and in 1976, CBS aired a one-hour pilot for a proposed series, based on Stong's novel and co-produced by Frankovich-Self Productions and Twentieth Century-Fox Television. The pilot was not picked up, however, and the series was not produced. Rodgers and Hammerstein's musical version of the story, which was the only score that they wrote directly for the screen, opened on Broadway on 27 Mar 1996. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
25 Aug 1945.
---
Daily Variety
20 Aug 45
p. 3.
Daily Variety
30 Aug 45
p. 3.
Film Daily
20 Aug 45
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Jul 43
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Nov 43
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
18 May 44
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Oct 44
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Oct 44
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Nov 44
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Jan 45
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Jan 45
p. 17.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Jan 45
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
6 Feb 45
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Feb 45
p. 16.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Mar 45
p. 48.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Apr 45
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Aug 45
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Aug 45
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
6 Sep 45
p. 12.
Motion Picture Daily
20 Aug 1945.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
5 May 45
p. 2434.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
25 Aug 45
pp. 2609-10.
New York Times
31 Aug 45
p. 14.
Variety
22 Aug 45
p. 20.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Mary Stewart
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
2d cam
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Assoc
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus dir
Orch arr
SOUND
Mus mixer
Mus mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec photog eff
Miniatures
DANCE
Dance dir
Asst dance dir
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
PRODUCTION MISC
Tech adv
Prod mgr
Research dir
Research asst
COLOR PERSONNEL
Technicolor dir
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel State Fair by Phil Stong (New York, 1932).
AUTHOR
SONGS
"Our State Fair," "It Might as Well Be Spring," "That's for Me," "It's a Grand Night for Singing," "Isn't It Kinda Fun" and "All I Owe Iowa," music by Richard Rodgers, lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein, II.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Rodgers and Hammerstein's State Fair
Release Date:
October 1945
Premiere Information:
World premiere in Des Moines, IA: 29 August 1945
New York opening: week of 30 August 1945
Los Angeles opening: 5 October 1945
Production Date:
3 January--mid March 1945
addl seq began 27 April 1945
Copyright Claimant:
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
29 August 1945
Copyright Number:
LP16
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
100
Length(in feet):
8,975
Length(in reels):
11
Country:
United States
PCA No:
10703
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

The members of the Frake family bustle about their Brunswick, Iowa farm, making the final preparations for their annual trip to the state fair. Father Abel, who is entering his prize boar, Blue Boy, in the hog contest, confers with mother Melissa, who is considering adding brandy to her mincemeat entry, while son Wayne practices his ring tossing and daughter Margy frets over her restlessness. Margy's sincere but boring beau, Harry Ware, tells Margy that he cannot accompany her to the fair, and when he proposes, she stalls by promising him an answer upon her return. Wayne's childhood sweetheart, Eleanor, cannot attend either, and both Wayne and Margy are melancholy as they leave. After the Frakes set up a temporary home in a nearby trailer park, Wayne goes to the fairgrounds, where he attempts to humiliate the ring toss barker, whose unfair tactics cost Wayne eight dollars the previous year. The barker threatens to call the police, but a beautiful young woman, claiming to be the police chief's daughter, persuades him to return Wayne's money. Wayne is enchanted by the woman, but she states that she is late for an appointment and leaves. Meanwhile, Margy makes the acquaintance of reporter Pat Gilbert, who is covering the fair for the Des Moines Register , and the couple spend a happy day together. That night, Margy and Pat again meet at the fairgrounds, and Wayne discovers that his mystery woman is singer Emily Edwards. Wayne persuades Emily to dance with him, and she soon returns his affections. The next day, as Abel broods over Blue Boy, who has become enamoured of a ... +


The members of the Frake family bustle about their Brunswick, Iowa farm, making the final preparations for their annual trip to the state fair. Father Abel, who is entering his prize boar, Blue Boy, in the hog contest, confers with mother Melissa, who is considering adding brandy to her mincemeat entry, while son Wayne practices his ring tossing and daughter Margy frets over her restlessness. Margy's sincere but boring beau, Harry Ware, tells Margy that he cannot accompany her to the fair, and when he proposes, she stalls by promising him an answer upon her return. Wayne's childhood sweetheart, Eleanor, cannot attend either, and both Wayne and Margy are melancholy as they leave. After the Frakes set up a temporary home in a nearby trailer park, Wayne goes to the fairgrounds, where he attempts to humiliate the ring toss barker, whose unfair tactics cost Wayne eight dollars the previous year. The barker threatens to call the police, but a beautiful young woman, claiming to be the police chief's daughter, persuades him to return Wayne's money. Wayne is enchanted by the woman, but she states that she is late for an appointment and leaves. Meanwhile, Margy makes the acquaintance of reporter Pat Gilbert, who is covering the fair for the Des Moines Register , and the couple spend a happy day together. That night, Margy and Pat again meet at the fairgrounds, and Wayne discovers that his mystery woman is singer Emily Edwards. Wayne persuades Emily to dance with him, and she soon returns his affections. The next day, as Abel broods over Blue Boy, who has become enamoured of a sow named Esmerelda, Melissa attends the judging of the pickles and mincemeat. Despite competition from a longtime rival, Melissa wins a prize for pickles and a special award for her mincemeat, to which both she and Abel secretly added brandy. In the evening, Wayne attends a birthday party given by Emily for Marty, a fellow singer, and is angered by Marty's snobbish insinuations about him. Emily calms Wayne down, and the couple spend the night declaring their love, as do Margy and Pat. Knowing that he is not the sort of fellow to settle down, Pat warns Margy that he is no good for her, but she vows that she will marry no one but him. Wayne and Margy arrive home at dawn, and that afternoon at the Swine Pavillion, Abel is triumphant when Blue Boy wins his contest, despite his continued lovesickness for Esmeralda. In the evening, Pat receives word that he has been offered an important job in Chicago and leaves without saying goodbye to Margy. The young woman is crushed by Pat's disappearance, and Wayne's romance also ends when he learns that Emily is married, although she is separated from her husband. The next day, after the Frakes return to their farm, Abel tries to collect on a wager he made with his pessimistic friend, Dave Miller, that the family members would all have a good time. Miller is reluctant to pay because of Wayne and Margy's sad faces, but when Margy receives a call from Pat, who says that he is driving to Brunswick to take her with him to Chicago, she declares that this year's fair was the best ever. Soon after Margy has dashed off, Wayne and Eleanor, who have reunited, cuddle as they drive past Margy and Pat embracing on the side of the road. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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