Utah (1945)

77-78 mins | Western | 21 March 1945

Director:

John English

Cinematographer:

Bill Bradford

Editor:

Harry Keller

Production Designer:

Gano Chittenden

Production Company:

Republic Pictures Corp.
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HISTORY

According to a HR news item, portions of the film were shot on location in Lone Pine, CA. Modern sources add the following actors to the cast: Ed Cassidy, Ralph Colby, Forrest Taylor and Horace B. ... More Less

According to a HR news item, portions of the film were shot on location in Lone Pine, CA. Modern sources add the following actors to the cast: Ed Cassidy, Ralph Colby, Forrest Taylor and Horace B. Carpenter. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
17 Mar 1945.
---
Daily Variety
9 Mar 45
p. 3.
Film Daily
12 Mar 45
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Nov 44
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Dec 44
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Dec 44
p. 15.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Mar 45
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
6 Jan 45
p. 2259.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
17 Mar 45
p. 2361.
New York Times
12 Mar 45
p. 22.
Variety
14 Mar 45
p. 16.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Asst dir
PRODUCER
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Based on a story by
Based on a story by
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
2d cam
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
Cost supv
MUSIC
Mus dir
Orch arr
SOUND
Re-rec and eff
Re-rec, eff and mus mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Matte paintings
Matte paintings
Transparency projection shots
DANCE
Dance dir
MAKEUP
Makeup
SOURCES
SONGS
"Utah Trail," words and music by Bob Palmer
"Utah," words and music by Charles Henderson
"Thank Dixie for Me," words and music by Dave Franklin
+
SONGS
"Utah Trail," words and music by Bob Palmer
"Utah," words and music by Charles Henderson
"Thank Dixie for Me," words and music by Dave Franklin
"Beneath a Western Sky," words and music by Glenn Spencer
"Wild and Wooly Cowgirls" and "Cowboy Blues," words and music by Tim Spencer
"Five Little Miles," words and music by Bob Nolan
"Welcome Home Miss Bryant," words and music by Ken Carson.
+
COMPOSERS
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
21 March 1945
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 7 March 1945
Production Date:
late November--late December 1944
Copyright Claimant:
Republic Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
8 March 1945
Copyright Number:
LP13188
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
77-78
Length(in feet):
6,952
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
PCA No:
10668
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

Dorothy Bryant, a singer in a Chicago musical play, learns that the show will shut down unless the producers come up with $25,000. She and her friends immediately set off for Coldbrook, Utah, where Dorothy has inherited the Bar X ranch, which is run by Roy Rogers and Gabby Whittaker. Realizing that Dorothy wants to put the ranch up for sale, Roy has his men fix up the place to impress her. When he picks the women up at the train station, however, Roy and Dorothy take a quick dislike to each other. He disapproves of her plan to sell the land, and she feels that he and Gabby take a superior tone with her. On the way back to the ranch, Roy pretends the car has broken down, which gives him and Gabby enough time to switch the signs between the Bar X and Gabby's small, broken-down piece of property. After Dorothy sees Gabby's place, thinking it is hers, she decides she cannot make much money from its sale and plans to leave the next day. Crooked cattle dealers Ben Bowman and Steve Lacey, however, make an appointment with her, hoping to take advantage of the misunderstanding by offering Dorothy very little money for her ranch, which they can then re-sell at a hefty profit. That night, Roy brings a horse over for Dorothy and they take a ride together, during which he shows her the beauty of the land and convinces her not to sell. In the meantime, Dorothy's friend, Wanda Harris, has met up with Robert, one of Roy's cattle drivers, and he has revealed Roy's plan to her. When Dorothy returns to their shack, she ... +


Dorothy Bryant, a singer in a Chicago musical play, learns that the show will shut down unless the producers come up with $25,000. She and her friends immediately set off for Coldbrook, Utah, where Dorothy has inherited the Bar X ranch, which is run by Roy Rogers and Gabby Whittaker. Realizing that Dorothy wants to put the ranch up for sale, Roy has his men fix up the place to impress her. When he picks the women up at the train station, however, Roy and Dorothy take a quick dislike to each other. He disapproves of her plan to sell the land, and she feels that he and Gabby take a superior tone with her. On the way back to the ranch, Roy pretends the car has broken down, which gives him and Gabby enough time to switch the signs between the Bar X and Gabby's small, broken-down piece of property. After Dorothy sees Gabby's place, thinking it is hers, she decides she cannot make much money from its sale and plans to leave the next day. Crooked cattle dealers Ben Bowman and Steve Lacey, however, make an appointment with her, hoping to take advantage of the misunderstanding by offering Dorothy very little money for her ranch, which they can then re-sell at a hefty profit. That night, Roy brings a horse over for Dorothy and they take a ride together, during which he shows her the beauty of the land and convinces her not to sell. In the meantime, Dorothy's friend, Wanda Harris, has met up with Robert, one of Roy's cattle drivers, and he has revealed Roy's plan to her. When Dorothy returns to their shack, she overhears Wanda telling the other women that Roy has been swindling Dorothy by making her fall in love with him. Hurt, she sells the land to Bowman for $5,000 the next day, and Bowman immediately brings his men to the Bar X to round up the cattle. Roy and his men rush out, and, not believing Bowman when he insists he now owns the ranch, they fight and land in jail. The sheriff finds Dorothy and the women at the train station, and they confirm that the ranch was sold. Robert warns Roy through the jail window that Bowman is loading the cattle onto a train for Chicago, and Roy breaks out of jail by giving the sheriff a mild electric shock. The men board the cattle train and, once in Chicago, fight Bowman and his men again. This time, they are all arrested, but when they arrive at the police station, the sheriff phones to say that Bowman's check to Dorothy has bounced and that the deal was all a trick. Although Bowman writes another check for Dorothy, the Chicago police hold him and Lacey for fraud. Roy delivers the now-good check to Dorothy, the show's name is changed to Utah , and Roy, Gabby and Dorothy show the rest of the cast how a "western comedy with music" should be done. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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