Why Girls Leave Home (1945)

68-70 mins | Drama | 9 October 1945

Director:

William Berke

Producer:

Samuel Sax

Cinematographer:

Mack Stengler

Editor:

Carl Pierson

Production Designer:

Edward C. Jewell

Production Company:

PRC Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

The working title of this film was Why Girls Leave . According to a mid-Nov 1944 HR news item, Sam Sax acquired the rights to Why Girls Leave Home , a 1921 Warner Bros. film, starring Anna Q. Nilsson and Maurine Powers, written and directed by William Nigh (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1921-30 ; F2.6335), intending to produce it for Republic Pictures. Why Girls Leave Home is listed in various Dec 1944 HR production charts as a Republic product, starring Rosemary Lane and Richard Cromwell. The Republic production apparently was abandoned before the start of principal photography. Some of the crew listed for the Republic production, including director William Berke and songwriters Jay Livingston and Ray Evans, worked on the PRC release; Lola Lane was cast in both, but all the other actors listed in the production charts were replaced. Jay Livingstone and Ray Evans' song "The Cat and the Canary" and Walter Greene's score were nominated for Academy ... More Less

The working title of this film was Why Girls Leave . According to a mid-Nov 1944 HR news item, Sam Sax acquired the rights to Why Girls Leave Home , a 1921 Warner Bros. film, starring Anna Q. Nilsson and Maurine Powers, written and directed by William Nigh (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1921-30 ; F2.6335), intending to produce it for Republic Pictures. Why Girls Leave Home is listed in various Dec 1944 HR production charts as a Republic product, starring Rosemary Lane and Richard Cromwell. The Republic production apparently was abandoned before the start of principal photography. Some of the crew listed for the Republic production, including director William Berke and songwriters Jay Livingston and Ray Evans, worked on the PRC release; Lola Lane was cast in both, but all the other actors listed in the production charts were replaced. Jay Livingstone and Ray Evans' song "The Cat and the Canary" and Walter Greene's score were nominated for Academy Awards. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
30 Jun 1945.
---
Daily Variety
7 Jun 45
p. 3.
Film Daily
18 Jun 45
pp. 5-6.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Nov 44
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Dec 44
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Feb 45
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Feb 45
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Mar 45
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Jun 45
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Aug 45
p. 8.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
17 Mar 45
p. 2366.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
16 Jun 45
p. 2498.
New York Times
4 Aug 45
p. 7.
Variety
8 Aug 45
p. 22.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
Prod
WRITERS
Orig story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dresser
Master of props
COSTUMES
Ward des
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOUND
MAKEUP
Dir of makeup
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
SOURCES
SONGS
"The Cat and the Canary," "What Am I Sayin'" and "Call Me," music and lyrics by Jay Livingston and Ray Evans.
DETAILS
Release Date:
9 October 1945
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 3 August 1945
Production Date:
22 February--early March 1945
Copyright Claimant:
PRC Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
5 November 1945
Copyright Number:
LP13590
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
68-70
Length(in feet):
6,342
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
PCA No:
10841
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

Late one foggy night, reporter Chris Williams saves Diana Leslie, a stranger, from drowning in the city river. Police investigator Reilly believes that Diana was attempting to kill herself, but Chris suspects that someone tried to murder her, and while the unconscious Diana rests in the hospital, he begins his own investigation into the mysterious drowning. In an interview with Diana's parents, Chris learns that their daughter's troubles began when she met Jimmie Lobo, a clarinet player at the Kitten Club, who tried to persuade Diana to pursue a career as a singer. Diana's mother then describes Jimmie's first visit to the Leslie house and the events that followed: After meeting her parents, Jimmie invites Diana to go with him to a "jam session" at the Kitten Club, but Diana's excessively protective brother Ted objects to the invitation and calls Jimmie and his pal "jive jumpers." Diana goes to the club, regardless, and returns later that night with news that she has taken a job there. Her family tries to persuade her to keep her office job, but Diana angrily opposes them, and Ted strikes her across the face. Diana's mother concludes her story by telling Chris that Diana left home that night and never returned. Jimmie later tells Chris that the first night he took her to the Kitten Club, Diana so impressed him with her singing, that he asked her to join his band. On the basis of his conversation with Jimmie, Chris concludes that Diana spurned Jimmie, and that he tried to kill her out of revenge. Chris then goes to the Kitten Club, where Steve Raymond, the crooked ... +


Late one foggy night, reporter Chris Williams saves Diana Leslie, a stranger, from drowning in the city river. Police investigator Reilly believes that Diana was attempting to kill herself, but Chris suspects that someone tried to murder her, and while the unconscious Diana rests in the hospital, he begins his own investigation into the mysterious drowning. In an interview with Diana's parents, Chris learns that their daughter's troubles began when she met Jimmie Lobo, a clarinet player at the Kitten Club, who tried to persuade Diana to pursue a career as a singer. Diana's mother then describes Jimmie's first visit to the Leslie house and the events that followed: After meeting her parents, Jimmie invites Diana to go with him to a "jam session" at the Kitten Club, but Diana's excessively protective brother Ted objects to the invitation and calls Jimmie and his pal "jive jumpers." Diana goes to the club, regardless, and returns later that night with news that she has taken a job there. Her family tries to persuade her to keep her office job, but Diana angrily opposes them, and Ted strikes her across the face. Diana's mother concludes her story by telling Chris that Diana left home that night and never returned. Jimmie later tells Chris that the first night he took her to the Kitten Club, Diana so impressed him with her singing, that he asked her to join his band. On the basis of his conversation with Jimmie, Chris concludes that Diana spurned Jimmie, and that he tried to kill her out of revenge. Chris then goes to the Kitten Club, where Steve Raymond, the crooked owner, recalls the day he first met Diana: While Raymond and his partner, Irene Mitchell, wait for Marien Mason, the band's alcoholic singer, to show up for rehearsals, Jimmie introduces them to Diana. Diana sings for Raymond and Irene, and they give her a job in the chorus. Raymond ends his story by telling Chris that Diana began her career as a naïve girl, but left the club with a "swelled head." Later, Chris, posing as Texan Henry Emerson, interviews Irene, who introduces him to Diana's roommate, Flo. The interview ends abruptly when Raymond finds Chris talking to Irene, but Flo follows Chris and tells him about the night she first met Diana: Moments after Flo warns Diana to get out of the club business before it is "too late," Irene introduces the two women to Ed Blake and Wilbur Harris, their "dates" for the night. Diana and Flo accompany Ed and Wilbur to the club's casino and encourage them to continue playing the roulette wheel until they lose all their money. When a shot rings out in the club and Wilbur is found dead, Raymond sees that Diana is frightened, and prevents her from talking by threatening her with harm. A short time later, Marien is replaced by Diana as the band's singer. When Diana tries to dissuade Flo's younger sister Alice from leaving her studies to take a job at the club, Raymond and Irene accuse her of interfering in their business. Flo comes out of her reverie and tells Chris that Diana told her that she intended to expose Irene and Raymond as racketeers. While Chris continues his investigation, his car is run off the road, and Flo is killed. Marien is later found murdered in her apartment, and her death is linked to Raymond's racket. Chris then discovers that Diana has been abducted from the hospital by Irene and Raymond, and taken to the Kitten Club. Chris and the police arrive at the club just as Irene is giving Diana a "sedative." Raymond confesses that he saw Irene follow Diana to the pier, and when Diana regains consciousness, she implicates Irene in the murder. Irene panics and shoots Raymond, but Jimmie kicks the gun out of her hand, and she is arrested. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.