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HISTORY

The working title of this film was Caroline . Can't Help Singing was the only Technicolor film to star Deanna Durbin. According to Universal press materials, portions of the film were shot on location in Cedar City, UT and Lake Arrowhead, CA. HR news items also list Parowan Gap and other Utah locations as filming sites. According to a HCN news item, Universal chose to shoot large portions of this color film in Utah rather than in California because of the greener scenery, the lack of high tension wires and the better cloud effects.
       According to HR news items, Universal originally sought Rouben Mamoulian as director, because he had directed the successful Broadway musical Oklahoma . In turn, the NYT reviewer pointed out the similarities between the songs "Oklahoma" and "Californi-I-Ay." HR news items include Marietta Canty in the cast, but her appearance in the released film has not been confirmed. According to HR , the film's $300,000 advertising budget was the largest of any Universal film to date. The film received two Academy Award nominations: Jerome Kern and H. J. Salter were nominated for their musical score and Kern and E. Y. Harburg were nominated for their song "More and ... More Less

The working title of this film was Caroline . Can't Help Singing was the only Technicolor film to star Deanna Durbin. According to Universal press materials, portions of the film were shot on location in Cedar City, UT and Lake Arrowhead, CA. HR news items also list Parowan Gap and other Utah locations as filming sites. According to a HCN news item, Universal chose to shoot large portions of this color film in Utah rather than in California because of the greener scenery, the lack of high tension wires and the better cloud effects.
       According to HR news items, Universal originally sought Rouben Mamoulian as director, because he had directed the successful Broadway musical Oklahoma . In turn, the NYT reviewer pointed out the similarities between the songs "Oklahoma" and "Californi-I-Ay." HR news items include Marietta Canty in the cast, but her appearance in the released film has not been confirmed. According to HR , the film's $300,000 advertising budget was the largest of any Universal film to date. The film received two Academy Award nominations: Jerome Kern and H. J. Salter were nominated for their musical score and Kern and E. Y. Harburg were nominated for their song "More and More." More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
16 Dec 1944.
---
Daily Variety
14 Dec 44
p. 3, 9
Film Daily
18 Dec 44
p. 8.
Hollywood Citizen-News
11 Aug 1944.
---
Hollywood Reporter
27 Aug 43
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Mar 44
p. 45.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Jun 44
p. 27.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Jun 44
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Jun 44
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Jun 44
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Aug 44
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Aug 44
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Sep 44
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Dec 44
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Jan 45
p. 6.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
9 Sep 44
p. 2093.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
16 Dec 44
p. 2225.
New York Times
26 Dec 44
p. 22.
Variety
20 Dec 44
p. 8.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Jim Farley
Fred Steele
Vic Potel
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Story
Story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus score and dir
Mus dir for Miss Durbin
Vocal coach
SOUND
Dir of sd
[Sd] tech
Re-rec and eff mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Miniatures
MAKEUP
Makeup dir
COLOR PERSONNEL
Technicolor col consultant
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Girl of the Overland Trail by Samuel J. and Curtis B. Warshawsky (publication date undetermined).
SONGS
"More and More," "Elbow Room," "Any Moment Now," "Swing Your Sweetheart 'Round the Fire," "Californi-I-Ay" and "Can't Help Singing," music by Jerome Kern, lyrics by E. Y. Harburg.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Caroline
Release Date:
29 December 1944
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 25 December 1944
Production Date:
13 June--mid September 1944
Copyright Claimant:
Universal Pictures Co., inc.
Copyright Date:
11 December 1944
Copyright Number:
LP13012
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
89
Length(in feet):
8,096
Country:
United States
PCA No:
10389
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In Washington, D.C., during the Gold Rush era, Senator Martin Frost arranges to have Lieutenant Robert Latham sent to California in order to keep the young man away from his daughter Caroline. Frost believes that Robert is an opportunist who is only interested in Caroline because she is the daughter of a powerful senator, but Caroline disagrees with him, and insists on marrying Robert. Without the approval of her father, Caroline boards the first train for Sonora, California, hoping to catch up with her sweetheart. Soon after leaving Washington, Caroline is reported missing in the local newspapers, and a nationwide manhunt ensues. After offering a $5,000 reward for the return of his daughter, Martin goes to Pittsburgh, where Caroline was last seen. When Caroline arrives in Independence, Missouri, she discovers that Robert's unit has already left for Fort Richards, and that there is no room available for her on the westward-bound wagon train. Determined to get to the fort, Caroline buys a horse and wagon from Sad Sam, a fast-talking confidence artist, only to discover that the horse and wagon were not his to sell. Later, at a gambling house, Caroline finds Sam gambling with her money, and when Sam loses the money to a prospector named Lawlor, she tries to take her money back. Lawlor recognizes Caroline as the missing senator's daughter and threatens to turn her in for the reward, until she offers him $10,000 to take her to California. Caroline promises Lawlor that he will be paid in California by the wealthy Jake Carstairs, whom she calls her "fiancée." Accompanied by two bumbling Russian thieves, Caroline and Lawlor join the wagon ... +


In Washington, D.C., during the Gold Rush era, Senator Martin Frost arranges to have Lieutenant Robert Latham sent to California in order to keep the young man away from his daughter Caroline. Frost believes that Robert is an opportunist who is only interested in Caroline because she is the daughter of a powerful senator, but Caroline disagrees with him, and insists on marrying Robert. Without the approval of her father, Caroline boards the first train for Sonora, California, hoping to catch up with her sweetheart. Soon after leaving Washington, Caroline is reported missing in the local newspapers, and a nationwide manhunt ensues. After offering a $5,000 reward for the return of his daughter, Martin goes to Pittsburgh, where Caroline was last seen. When Caroline arrives in Independence, Missouri, she discovers that Robert's unit has already left for Fort Richards, and that there is no room available for her on the westward-bound wagon train. Determined to get to the fort, Caroline buys a horse and wagon from Sad Sam, a fast-talking confidence artist, only to discover that the horse and wagon were not his to sell. Later, at a gambling house, Caroline finds Sam gambling with her money, and when Sam loses the money to a prospector named Lawlor, she tries to take her money back. Lawlor recognizes Caroline as the missing senator's daughter and threatens to turn her in for the reward, until she offers him $10,000 to take her to California. Caroline promises Lawlor that he will be paid in California by the wealthy Jake Carstairs, whom she calls her "fiancée." Accompanied by two bumbling Russian thieves, Caroline and Lawlor join the wagon train heading west. Along the way, Caroline and Lawlor fall in love, and vow never to separate. In California, Lawlor sends Caroline to tell Carstairs that they are in love, and Caroline, who has never met Carstairs, persuades the millionaire to play along with the hoax. Complications arise, however, when Carstairs' wife arrives and accuses her husband of having an affair. In the confusion, Robert arrives, calling out to his fiancée. A fistfight between Robert and Lawlor ensues as Lawlor believes that Caroline has a third suitor. The truth comes out, though, and Lawlor and Caroline resume their romance and celebrate with a song. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.