Deception (1946)

110-111 mins | Drama | 26 October 1946

Director:

Irving Rapper

Producer:

Henry Blanke

Cinematographer:

Ernest Haller

Production Designer:

Anton Grot

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

The film's working title was Her Conscience . A press release included in the file on the film at the AMPAS Library notes that the studio purchased Louis Verneuil's play Monsieur Lamberthier as a vehicle for Barbara Stanwyck and Paul Henreid. The play was produced in New York, opening on 22 Oct 1928 under the title Jealousy . Under the title Obsession , the play opened in New York on 1 Oct 1946. The play had only two characters; the composer was only a voice on the telephone. In a modern source, Bette Davis recalls that she tried to convince Warner Bros. to make the motion picture as a two-person film. According to a 13 Feb 1946 HR news item, Bette Davis objected to the title Her Conscience , and Jealousy , the American title of the play, could not be used as Republic Pictures had recently released a film with that title.
       Modern sources add the following information about the production: Shura Cherassky played the piano during Davis' solo, even though Davis, who had played piano as a child, practiced the piece for three hours a day in order to perform credibly on film. During the cello-playing scenes, Paul Henreid's hands were tied behind his back and two actual cellists were used in the close shots--one placed his right hand through Henreid's right sleeve and worked the bow; the other placed his left arm through Henreid's left sleeve and did the fingering. Bette Davis learned that she was pregnant during filming. Verneuil's play was also the basis for the 1929 film ... More Less

The film's working title was Her Conscience . A press release included in the file on the film at the AMPAS Library notes that the studio purchased Louis Verneuil's play Monsieur Lamberthier as a vehicle for Barbara Stanwyck and Paul Henreid. The play was produced in New York, opening on 22 Oct 1928 under the title Jealousy . Under the title Obsession , the play opened in New York on 1 Oct 1946. The play had only two characters; the composer was only a voice on the telephone. In a modern source, Bette Davis recalls that she tried to convince Warner Bros. to make the motion picture as a two-person film. According to a 13 Feb 1946 HR news item, Bette Davis objected to the title Her Conscience , and Jealousy , the American title of the play, could not be used as Republic Pictures had recently released a film with that title.
       Modern sources add the following information about the production: Shura Cherassky played the piano during Davis' solo, even though Davis, who had played piano as a child, practiced the piece for three hours a day in order to perform credibly on film. During the cello-playing scenes, Paul Henreid's hands were tied behind his back and two actual cellists were used in the close shots--one placed his right hand through Henreid's right sleeve and worked the bow; the other placed his left arm through Henreid's left sleeve and did the fingering. Bette Davis learned that she was pregnant during filming. Verneuil's play was also the basis for the 1929 film Jealousy , starring Jeanne Eagles and Anthony Bushnell and directed by Jean De Limur (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1921-30 ; F2.2798). More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
19 Oct 1946.
---
Daily Variety
17 Oct 46
p. 3.
Film Daily
24 Oct 46
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Feb 46
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Apr 46
p. 23.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Sep 46
p. 17.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Oct 46
p. 3, 9
Hollywood Reporter
28 Oct 46
p. 6.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
5 Oct 46
p. 3238.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
19 Oct 46
p. 3261.
New York Times
19 Oct 46
p. 15.
Variety
23 Oct 46
p. 10.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Warner Bros.--First National Picture
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dial dir
Orch numbers staged by
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATOR
COSTUMES
MUSIC
SOUND
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play Monsieur Lamberthier by Louis Verneuil (Paris, 1927).
MUSIC
Piano Sonata No. 23, Opus 57 in F Minor ( Appassionata ) by Ludwig van Beethoven
Hollenius' Cello Concerto by Erich Wolfgang Korngold.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Her Conscience
Release Date:
26 October 1946
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 18 October 1946
Production Date:
25 April--mid September 1946
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
26 October 1946
Copyright Number:
LP642
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
110-111
Country:
United States
PCA No:
11772
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

After a long wartime separation, pianist Christine Radcliffe is reunited in New York with her fiancé, cellist Karel Novak. Although Christine excitedly plans their wedding, she is reticent about her past. When Karel demands to know how a struggling musician like Christine can afford an elegant apartment and expensive wardrobe, Christine explains that she has taken on students, something they long ago agreed they would never do, and was ashamed to tell him. The next morning, Christine receives a call from composer Alexander Hollenius, whose mistress she has been, and announces her coming marriage. Later, Hollenius arrives unexpectedly at a party celebrating the marriage, and tells Karel that he fears marriage will interfere with Christine's devotion to her music. Karel is convinced that Hollenius' strange behavior is due to jealousy, especially after Hollenius discloses that Christine never had students. The following day, Christine visits Hollenius and begs him not to reveal their relationship because she is afraid that the information would strain the temperamental Karel's nerves. Later, Karel visits Hollenius, believing that Christine will be there despite her assertion that Hollenius was never more than her teacher. To his surprise, he discovers that Hollenius is listening to a recording that Karel made before the war. Hollenius is impressed by Karel's talent and offers him a new cello concerto that he has written. When Christine hears Karel practicing Hollenius' concerto, she becomes convinced that Hollenius intends to use the concerto to destroy Karel. Her fears are intensified when Karel returns home after playing the concerto for Hollenius and rails against the composer's dictatorial behavior. When Christine reveals her apprehensions to Karel, ... +


After a long wartime separation, pianist Christine Radcliffe is reunited in New York with her fiancé, cellist Karel Novak. Although Christine excitedly plans their wedding, she is reticent about her past. When Karel demands to know how a struggling musician like Christine can afford an elegant apartment and expensive wardrobe, Christine explains that she has taken on students, something they long ago agreed they would never do, and was ashamed to tell him. The next morning, Christine receives a call from composer Alexander Hollenius, whose mistress she has been, and announces her coming marriage. Later, Hollenius arrives unexpectedly at a party celebrating the marriage, and tells Karel that he fears marriage will interfere with Christine's devotion to her music. Karel is convinced that Hollenius' strange behavior is due to jealousy, especially after Hollenius discloses that Christine never had students. The following day, Christine visits Hollenius and begs him not to reveal their relationship because she is afraid that the information would strain the temperamental Karel's nerves. Later, Karel visits Hollenius, believing that Christine will be there despite her assertion that Hollenius was never more than her teacher. To his surprise, he discovers that Hollenius is listening to a recording that Karel made before the war. Hollenius is impressed by Karel's talent and offers him a new cello concerto that he has written. When Christine hears Karel practicing Hollenius' concerto, she becomes convinced that Hollenius intends to use the concerto to destroy Karel. Her fears are intensified when Karel returns home after playing the concerto for Hollenius and rails against the composer's dictatorial behavior. When Christine reveals her apprehensions to Karel, he demands to know why she is afraid that Hollenius will take the concerto away from him, but Christine still refuses to tell her husband the truth about her relationship with the composer. The next day, Christine returns to Hollenius' apartment to beg him not to take out his anger on Karel, and Hollenius scoffs at her, responding that his first duty is to his music and that he is sure Karel will perform the piece well. He urges Christine to tell her husband the truth. As she leaves the apartment, Christine sees Bertram Gribble, the orchestra's first cellist, waiting in the foyer and is sure that Hollenius intends to replace Karel with Gribble. On the night of the performance, after Karel has left for the concert hall, Christine again visits Hollenius and begs him to promise that he will not tell Karel of their relationship, and when Hollenius refuses, Christine shoots him. She then tries to make the murder look like a suicide and leaves for the concert. Karel performs the music brilliantly, and the way now seems clear for a successful concert career in America. When Karel and Christine are alone in his dressing room, however, she realizes that Hollenius always intended for Karel to perform his composition. She then confesses the murder to Karel as well as the truth about her relationship with Hollenius. Karel asks her to keep the murder a secret, but Christine is finally tired of her deception, and the couple leaves for the police station, walking past crowds of Karel's admirers. +

GENRE
Genre:


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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