From This Day Forward (1946)

95 mins | Drama | April 1946

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HISTORY

The working title of this film was All Brides Are Beautiful . According to contemporary sources, RKO bought the rights to Thomas Bell's novel in 1940 and updated it to include World War II. RKO borrowed Mark Stevens, who made his screen debut in the picture, and Henry Morgan from Twentieth Century-Fox, and Joan Fontaine from David O. Selznick's company. Director John Berry was borrowed from Paramount. According to a HR news item, Sally Gettleman was cast in the picture, but her appearance in the final film has not been confirmed. HR also notes that at the time of the picture's release, advisor Roy Stockston, the head of the California Veteran Division of the USES, conducted radio interviews of ex-servicemen and counseled them about employment problems. Modern sources note that while the film received lukewarm reviews, it was a box office hit. Joan Fontaine and Mark Stevens reprised their roles in a Lux Radio Theatre broadcast on 28 Oct ... More Less

The working title of this film was All Brides Are Beautiful . According to contemporary sources, RKO bought the rights to Thomas Bell's novel in 1940 and updated it to include World War II. RKO borrowed Mark Stevens, who made his screen debut in the picture, and Henry Morgan from Twentieth Century-Fox, and Joan Fontaine from David O. Selznick's company. Director John Berry was borrowed from Paramount. According to a HR news item, Sally Gettleman was cast in the picture, but her appearance in the final film has not been confirmed. HR also notes that at the time of the picture's release, advisor Roy Stockston, the head of the California Veteran Division of the USES, conducted radio interviews of ex-servicemen and counseled them about employment problems. Modern sources note that while the film received lukewarm reviews, it was a box office hit. Joan Fontaine and Mark Stevens reprised their roles in a Lux Radio Theatre broadcast on 28 Oct 1946. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
2 Mar 1946.
---
Daily Variety
26 Feb 46
p. 3.
Film Daily
1 Mar 46
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Aug 45
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Aug 45
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Oct 45
p. 15.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Oct 45
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Mar 46
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Feb 46
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
23 Feb 46
p. 2861.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
2 Mar 46
p. 2869.
New York Times
20 Apr 46
p. 16.
Variety
27 Feb 46
p. 8.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
And introducing
Tim Hawkins
Tom Noonan
Johnny Indrisano
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
2d unit dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
WRITERS
Addl scenes
Addl scenes
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
2d cam
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus dir
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Matte paintings
Opt eff
PRODUCTION MISC
Tech adv
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel All Brides Are Beautiful by Thomas Bell (Boston, 1936).
AUTHOR
SONGS
"From This Day Forward," words by Mort Greene, music by Leigh Harline.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
All Brides Are Beautiful
Release Date:
April 1946
Premiere Information:
World premiere in San Francisco: 27 March 1946
New York opening: 19 April 1946
Production Date:
25 August--late October 1945
Copyright Claimant:
RKO Radio Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
22 March 1946
Copyright Number:
LP253
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
95
Country:
United States
PCA No:
11351
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

After New Yorker Bill Cummings is discharged from the army, he goes to the U.S. Employment Service Center to apply for a job. Overwhelmed by the paperwork and the number of other unemployed veterans there, Bill finds himself recalling his past: In 1938, Bill and his girl friend Susan go to Susan's older sister Martha's for dinner. While the harried Martha, who is meeting Bill for the first time, advises Susan to wait before marrying, Hank Beesley, Martha's chatty, out-of-work husband, discusses his domestic theories with machinist Bill. Later that day, Bill proposes to Susan, but states that he may not be able to make her happy. Despite Bill's apprehensions about his economic future, Susan accepts his proposal, and the newlyweds relish the first blissful days of their married life. Soon, however, Bill is laid off from his factory job when his employer goes bankrupt, and he is unable to find another. Although Susan's job as a bookstore clerk covers most of their bills, Bill is humiliated by his situation, especially after Hank and Martha's young son Timmy offers to beg for a soup bone from the local butcher because he believes that Bill "doesn't know where his next meal is coming from." Determined to help her husband, Susan, an aspiring artist, convinces her boss, Hinkler, to hire Bill to illustrate a book he is publishing. Bill receives a fifty dollar advance and eagerly executes the assignment. Bill and Susan's modest prosperity is short-lived, however, as Bill is arrested on obscenity charges. Unknown to Bill, the text of Hinkler's book contains censorable material, and he is advised by Martha's lawyer ... +


After New Yorker Bill Cummings is discharged from the army, he goes to the U.S. Employment Service Center to apply for a job. Overwhelmed by the paperwork and the number of other unemployed veterans there, Bill finds himself recalling his past: In 1938, Bill and his girl friend Susan go to Susan's older sister Martha's for dinner. While the harried Martha, who is meeting Bill for the first time, advises Susan to wait before marrying, Hank Beesley, Martha's chatty, out-of-work husband, discusses his domestic theories with machinist Bill. Later that day, Bill proposes to Susan, but states that he may not be able to make her happy. Despite Bill's apprehensions about his economic future, Susan accepts his proposal, and the newlyweds relish the first blissful days of their married life. Soon, however, Bill is laid off from his factory job when his employer goes bankrupt, and he is unable to find another. Although Susan's job as a bookstore clerk covers most of their bills, Bill is humiliated by his situation, especially after Hank and Martha's young son Timmy offers to beg for a soup bone from the local butcher because he believes that Bill "doesn't know where his next meal is coming from." Determined to help her husband, Susan, an aspiring artist, convinces her boss, Hinkler, to hire Bill to illustrate a book he is publishing. Bill receives a fifty dollar advance and eagerly executes the assignment. Bill and Susan's modest prosperity is short-lived, however, as Bill is arrested on obscenity charges. Unknown to Bill, the text of Hinkler's book contains censorable material, and he is advised by Martha's lawyer brother-in-law Jake to plead guilty and receive probation. Now broke and jobless, the couple is forced to move into a tenement. Despite their poverty, Bill gives Susan a bracelet for their first anniversary with money he collected by pawning his tool box. Soon after, Bill's union notifies him that a munitions factory job is available but requires that he bring his own tools. With help from Martha and Hank's miserly mother, Bill collects enough cash to reclaim his tool box and happily returns to work. Once back on their feet, Bill and Susan discuss the possibility of starting a family, but their plans are waylaid when Bill is inducted into the army at the start of World War II. Back in the employment office, where he has been telling the end of his story to various sympathetic employees, Bill is finally awarded a job interview. As Bill rushes to the Beesleys' with his good news, Susan confides to Martha that she is pregnant. Although Bill confesses that he is scared, both he and Susan face the future together with hope. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.