I've Always Loved You (1946)

116-117 mins | Romance | 27 August 1946

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HISTORY

The working title of this film was Concerto . In Oct 1945, LAT reported that director-producer Frank Borzage and Republic decided to change the title from Concerto to I've Always Loved You because the majority of exhibitors polled "were afraid the public wouldn't know what 'concerto' means." Artur Rubinstein's onscreen credit reads, "Piano Recordings by Artur Rubinstein World's Greatest Pianist Featuring the Music of Rachmaninoff, Chopin, Wagner, Beethoven, Liszt, Mendolssohn Bach." Studio publicity does not list any compositions by Liszt in the production, however. An Aug 1945 LAT news item reported that famed pianist Rubinstein would be paid $85,000 for playing the piano music heard in the film.
       According to a 28 Mar 1945 DV news item, Republic purchased Borden Chase's short story for $100,000 upon the request of Borzage, thereby beating bids from two other studios. The news item reported that Chase's story, entitled "Concerto," was based on the career of his wife, concert pianist Lee Keith. A 25 Jul 1945 HR news item noted that Adrian Booth, a "non-professional," was tested for one of the leading roles, but her appearance in the completed film is doubtful. On 3 Apr 1945, DV announced that thirteen-year-old piano prodigy Peggy Constance had been signed for the picture, which would mark her screen debut, but her appearance in the finished film has not been confirmed. Although Richard L. Van Enger receives sole onscreen credit as the film's editor, some HR production charts list Murray Seldeen as the editor.
       The picture, which had a two-million dollar budget according to a ... More Less

The working title of this film was Concerto . In Oct 1945, LAT reported that director-producer Frank Borzage and Republic decided to change the title from Concerto to I've Always Loved You because the majority of exhibitors polled "were afraid the public wouldn't know what 'concerto' means." Artur Rubinstein's onscreen credit reads, "Piano Recordings by Artur Rubinstein World's Greatest Pianist Featuring the Music of Rachmaninoff, Chopin, Wagner, Beethoven, Liszt, Mendolssohn Bach." Studio publicity does not list any compositions by Liszt in the production, however. An Aug 1945 LAT news item reported that famed pianist Rubinstein would be paid $85,000 for playing the piano music heard in the film.
       According to a 28 Mar 1945 DV news item, Republic purchased Borden Chase's short story for $100,000 upon the request of Borzage, thereby beating bids from two other studios. The news item reported that Chase's story, entitled "Concerto," was based on the career of his wife, concert pianist Lee Keith. A 25 Jul 1945 HR news item noted that Adrian Booth, a "non-professional," was tested for one of the leading roles, but her appearance in the completed film is doubtful. On 3 Apr 1945, DV announced that thirteen-year-old piano prodigy Peggy Constance had been signed for the picture, which would mark her screen debut, but her appearance in the finished film has not been confirmed. Although Richard L. Van Enger receives sole onscreen credit as the film's editor, some HR production charts list Murray Seldeen as the editor.
       The picture, which had a two-million dollar budget according to a HR news item, was the first Technicolor film produced by Republic and the first picture made by Borzage under his 1945 producer-director contract with the studio. Contemporary news items noted that Republic had intended to release the picture in Feb 1946 but could not do so because "crowded laboratory conditions at the Technicolor plant" delayed print availability. According to a 9 Nov 1945 HR news item, Borzage intended to exhibit the film at "special showings to music organizations and societies around the country," including a "special performance...for some two hundred outstanding figures in the world of classical music at Carnegie Hall some time in February." A Sep 1945 HR news item noted that Borzage also intended to send stars Catherine McLeod and William Carter on a twenty-eight-city promotional tour to introduce them to the press, exhibitors and audiences.
       Although several contemporary sources referred to McLeod and Carter as "screen newcomers," they had both appeared previously in minor film roles. The picture marked the first screen appearance of André Previn, who plays one of the auditioning music students. Previn received his first onscreen credit, for playing piano solos, in the 1947 M-G-M production It Happened in Brooklyn (see above). According to a DV news item, the farmhouse sequences were shot on location at the Rowland V. Lee Ranch in San Fernando Valley, CA. On 4 Nov 1946, McLeod starred with Joseph Cotten and Otto Kruger in the Lux Radio Theatre broadcast of the story. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
7 Sep 1946.
---
Daily Variety
28 Mar 1945.
---
Daily Variety
3 Apr 1945.
---
Daily Variety
3 Aug 1945.
---
Daily Variety
13 Aug 1945.
---
Daily Variety
23 Nov 1945.
---
Daily Variety
29 Aug 46
p. 3, 10
Film Daily
30 Aug 46
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
28 Mar 45
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Jul 45
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
6 Aug 45
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Sep 45
p. 17.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Sep 1945.
---
Hollywood Reporter
26 Oct 45
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
30 Oct 45
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Nov 45
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Nov 45
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Aug 46
p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
8 Aug 1945.
---
Los Angeles Times
29 Oct 1945.
---
Motion Picture Daily
29 Aug 1946.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
1 Sep 45
p. 2628.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
7 Sep 46
pp. 3185-86.
New York Times
7 Sep 46
p. 11.
Time
16 Sep 1946.
---
Variety
4 Sep 46
p. 10.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
2d cam
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des in col by
Architecture
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOUND
Re-rec and eff mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec photog eff
Spec photog eff
Matte paintings
Transparency projection shots
MAKEUP
Makeup supv
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit mgr
COLOR PERSONNEL
Technicolor col consultant
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the short story "Concerto" by Borden Chase in American Magazine (Dec 1939).
AUTHOR
MUSIC
Piano Concerto No. 2 in C Minor and Prelude in C-sharp Minor by Sergei Rachmaninoff
Piano Sonata No. 23, Opus 57 in F Minor ( Appassionata ) by Ludwig van Beethoven
Overture from the opera The Magic Flute and Sonata in C Major by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
+
MUSIC
Piano Concerto No. 2 in C Minor and Prelude in C-sharp Minor by Sergei Rachmaninoff
Piano Sonata No. 23, Opus 57 in F Minor ( Appassionata ) by Ludwig van Beethoven
Overture from the opera The Magic Flute and Sonata in C Major by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
"Leibestodt" from the opera Tristan and Isolde by Richard Wagner
Ballade in G Minor, Nocturne No. 5 in F-sharp Major and Prelude No. 1, Opus 28 by Frédéric Chopin
Rondo capriccioso , Opus 14 by Felix Mendelssohn
Toccata and Fugue in D Minor by Johann Sebastian Bach
Moments musicals by Franz Schubert
"Brazilian Folk Song" by Heitor Villa-Lobos
"Weigenlied (Cradle Song)" by Johannes Brahms.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Concerto
Release Date:
27 August 1946
Production Date:
6 August--25 October 1945
Copyright Claimant:
Republic Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
21 June 1946
Copyright Number:
LP452
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
116-117
Length(in reels):
12
Country:
United States
PCA No:
11221
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

World-renowned pianist Leopold Goronoff goes to Philadelphia to judge auditions for a music scholarship and is pleased to meet Fredrich Hassman, a once great pianist who retired from a successful career in order to marry and teach. Despite the egotistical, chauvinistic Goronoff's assertion that marriage is irrelevant for a musician, Hassman introduces him to his daughter Myra, who is there for the audition. Goronoff is enchanted by Myra's loveliness and talent and later goes to the Hassman farm in Pennsylvania. Myra, dazzled by Goronoff's ability and arrogance, is thrilled when he then postpones a European concert tour to stay with them. As Goronoff tutors Myra, her infatuation with him deepens, much to the dismay of George Sampter, the farmhand who has loved Myra since they were children. After a month, Goronoff must leave to fulfill his concert schedule and he offers to take Myra along as his protegee. Myra is delighted to have the opportunity to see the world, and George encourages her while sadly bidding her farewell. In New York City, Goronoff introduces Myra to his autocratic grandmother, Mama Goronoff, who reprimands him for letting someone come between him and his music. Mama warms to Myra when she hears her play, however, and soon the little family, along with Goronoff's secretary, Nikolas Kavlun, is traveling throughout Europe. Tiring of Europe, Goronoff packs them off to South America, and there, Myra learns that her father has passed away. Despite her sadness, Myra continues to learn from Goronoff and also to shoo away his many girl friends, to whom he always promises marriage. After two years of training, Goronoff proclaims Myra ready for ... +


World-renowned pianist Leopold Goronoff goes to Philadelphia to judge auditions for a music scholarship and is pleased to meet Fredrich Hassman, a once great pianist who retired from a successful career in order to marry and teach. Despite the egotistical, chauvinistic Goronoff's assertion that marriage is irrelevant for a musician, Hassman introduces him to his daughter Myra, who is there for the audition. Goronoff is enchanted by Myra's loveliness and talent and later goes to the Hassman farm in Pennsylvania. Myra, dazzled by Goronoff's ability and arrogance, is thrilled when he then postpones a European concert tour to stay with them. As Goronoff tutors Myra, her infatuation with him deepens, much to the dismay of George Sampter, the farmhand who has loved Myra since they were children. After a month, Goronoff must leave to fulfill his concert schedule and he offers to take Myra along as his protegee. Myra is delighted to have the opportunity to see the world, and George encourages her while sadly bidding her farewell. In New York City, Goronoff introduces Myra to his autocratic grandmother, Mama Goronoff, who reprimands him for letting someone come between him and his music. Mama warms to Myra when she hears her play, however, and soon the little family, along with Goronoff's secretary, Nikolas Kavlun, is traveling throughout Europe. Tiring of Europe, Goronoff packs them off to South America, and there, Myra learns that her father has passed away. Despite her sadness, Myra continues to learn from Goronoff and also to shoo away his many girl friends, to whom he always promises marriage. After two years of training, Goronoff proclaims Myra ready for a concert of her own and they return to New York, where Myra is to play Rachmaninoff's Piano Concerto No. 2 at Carnegie Hall. Goronoff conducts as Myra plays the piano, but her brilliant playing sparks his envy until the concerto becomes a battle between them. Myra is bewildered by Goronoff's overt anger and she leaves the stage in tears after he has proven his domination over her. Back at their hotel, Goronoff castigates Myra for what he perceives as her attempt to copy his style, then dismisses her. After Myra leaves, Mama tells Goronoff that he has made a mistake, and that his dismissal of Myra is an admission that she is the better musician. Myra returns to the Hassman farm, where her connection to Goronoff remains so strong that one evening, while he is playing a concert in New York, she plays the same piece at home. When Myra stops playing, Goronoff abruptly leaves the stage, then announces his retirement from performing. George refuses to allow Myra to mope and persuades her to marry him, even though he fears that she will always love Goronoff. As the years pass, George and Myra have a daughter named Georgette, whom they call Porgy, and Goronoff teaches piano. Six years after their parting, Goronoff finally realizes that he has loved Myra all along, but Mama, knowing that Myra is married, makes Goronoff promise not to go after her. Years later, Porgy, now a young adult, reveals to Myra that she has secretly been studying piano with Michael Severin, a former student of Goronoff. Severin wants Porgy to come with him to New York, where he will present her in her first concert at Carnegie Hall, and although Myra is overwhelmed with doubt, she allows Porgy to go. Just before Porgy's concert, George talks Myra into presenting her to Goronoff, who will give her an honest opinion of Porgy's talent. Determined to face her fears about her lingering love for Goronoff, Myra takes Porgy to see him, and he quickly realizes that Porgy, while talented, is not a great musician. Goronoff sends Porgy away and arrogantly tells Myra that he is still her master. Myra spurns Goronoff's attempt to kiss her, however, and that night, takes Porgy's place at the piano. Goronoff substitutes for Severin as conductor, and the former teacher and pupil recreate their earlier battle when they again play Rachmaninoff's Piano Concerto No. 2. Myra easily holds her own, and does not allow Goronoff to intimidate her. Moved by Myra's grace and talent, Goronoff finally admits to himself that he was wrong, and that "there is a woman in music." Before the music ends, Myra rushes offstage, where George is waiting, and declares that she has always loved him. George embraces his trembling, happy wife, and assures her that he has always known of her love for him. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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