Rainbow Over Texas (1946)

65 mins | Western | 9 May 1946

Director:

Frank McDonald

Writer:

Gerald Geraghty

Cinematographer:

Reggie Lanning

Production Designer:

Hilyard Brown

Production Company:

Republic Pictures Corp.
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HISTORY

According to a 14 Jan 1946 HR news item, this film was shot on location at Vasquez Rocks in Chatsworth, ... More Less

According to a 14 Jan 1946 HR news item, this film was shot on location at Vasquez Rocks in Chatsworth, CA. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
18 May 1946.
---
Daily Variety
6 May 46
p. 3.
Film Daily
9 May 46
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Jan 46
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Jan 46
p. 15.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Jan 46
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Jan 46
p. 16.
Hollywood Reporter
6 May 46
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
9 Mar 46
p. 2883.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
11 May 46
p. 2986.
Variety
8 May 46
p. 8.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
Assoc prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
COSTUMES
Cost supv
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOUND
Re-rec and eff mixer
Re-rec and eff mixer
Mus mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Matte paintings
Miniatures and spec optical eff
Spec optical eff
Transparency projection shots
MAKEUP
Makeup supv
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the serial story "Senor Coyote" by Max Brand in Argosy (18 Jun--25 Jun 1938).
AUTHOR
SONGS
"Rainbow Over Texas" and "Lights of Old Santa Fe," music and lyrics by Jack Elliott
"Little Senorita," music and lyrics by Jack Elliott, Spanish lyrics by Glenn Spencer
"Texas, USA" and "Cowboy Camp Meetin'," music and lyrics by Gordon Forster
+
SONGS
"Rainbow Over Texas" and "Lights of Old Santa Fe," music and lyrics by Jack Elliott
"Little Senorita," music and lyrics by Jack Elliott, Spanish lyrics by Glenn Spencer
"Texas, USA" and "Cowboy Camp Meetin'," music and lyrics by Gordon Forster
"Riding Down the Sunset Trail," composers undetermined.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
9 May 1946
Production Date:
10 Jan--late Jan 1946
Copyright Claimant:
Republic Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
18 April 1946
Copyright Number:
LP372
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
65
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
PCA No:
11468
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

Jackie Dalrymple, the daughter of meat packing tycoon Wooster J. Dalrymple, is tired of her father's insistence that she forget her desire to explore his Western roots. Wooster, who left the Texas town he purchased and named after himself, is intent on preserving his veneer of Eastern high society and forbids Jackie to visit the town of Dalrymple or even listen to her records of famous western movie star Roy Rogers. Roy is Jackie's favorite singer, and she has attended five of his current personal appearance tour shows. Sympathetic to Jackie's plight, cruise ship captain Monroe helps her to escape, and soon after, Jackie, dressed as a boy, is hiding on a train bound for Dalrymple. Also aboard the train is Roy and his fellow performers, The Sons of the Pioneers, and one day, Roy is tending to his horse Trigger when he finds Jackie hiding in the car. Believing Jackie to be a runaway boy, Roy promises to let her acccompany him to Dalrymple, which is Roy's hometown. Roy disdains the snobbish Wooster, who changed the town's name from Rainbow to Dalrymple, and so Jackie further conceals her identity by saying that her last name is Larkin. In Dalrymple, Roy is reunited with his old pal, Sheriff Gabby Whittaker, and introduced to crooked casino owner Kirby Haynes and his henchman, Pete McAvoy. Roy and The Sons are in town to participate in the town's Frontier Days celebration, which is to include a Pony Express relay race. Soon after their arrival, Roy discovers that Jackie is a woman, but moved by her pleas for help, he introduces her to another old friend, Mama ... +


Jackie Dalrymple, the daughter of meat packing tycoon Wooster J. Dalrymple, is tired of her father's insistence that she forget her desire to explore his Western roots. Wooster, who left the Texas town he purchased and named after himself, is intent on preserving his veneer of Eastern high society and forbids Jackie to visit the town of Dalrymple or even listen to her records of famous western movie star Roy Rogers. Roy is Jackie's favorite singer, and she has attended five of his current personal appearance tour shows. Sympathetic to Jackie's plight, cruise ship captain Monroe helps her to escape, and soon after, Jackie, dressed as a boy, is hiding on a train bound for Dalrymple. Also aboard the train is Roy and his fellow performers, The Sons of the Pioneers, and one day, Roy is tending to his horse Trigger when he finds Jackie hiding in the car. Believing Jackie to be a runaway boy, Roy promises to let her acccompany him to Dalrymple, which is Roy's hometown. Roy disdains the snobbish Wooster, who changed the town's name from Rainbow to Dalrymple, and so Jackie further conceals her identity by saying that her last name is Larkin. In Dalrymple, Roy is reunited with his old pal, Sheriff Gabby Whittaker, and introduced to crooked casino owner Kirby Haynes and his henchman, Pete McAvoy. Roy and The Sons are in town to participate in the town's Frontier Days celebration, which is to include a Pony Express relay race. Soon after their arrival, Roy discovers that Jackie is a woman, but moved by her pleas for help, he introduces her to another old friend, Mama Lolita, who offers her shelter. Meanwhile, Gabby receives a telegram from Wooster informing him about Jackie's disappearance, but Jackie persuades Gabby to keep the truth from Roy, with whom she is falling in love. Their conversation is interrupted by a holdup of the nearby bank, and Gabby and Roy lead the posse chasing the outlaw. Roy shoots and wounds the masked man, Pete, but when he follows Pete to a ranch house, Roy instead finds rancher Jim Pollard. Jim, who had been knocked unconscious, is now wearing Pete's clothes, but because he does not have a gunshot wound, Roy realizes that Jim is being framed. Roy helps Jim escape, then returns to town with his horse, hat and gun, and claims that the outlaw fell off a cliff into the river below. Pete, who has returned to the saloon, is instructed by Haynes to steal Roy's horses, as Haynes is afraid that Roy will win the Pony Express race and thereby ruin his bets. After the horses have been stolen, Jackie subtly instructs Gabby to get new horses for Roy from the Dalrymple ranch, but while there, Roy discovers the truth about Jackie's identity from the newly arrived Wooster. Angry at having been deceived, Roy returns to town, and there, finds a clue that prompts him to question Jim about his connection to Haynes. Jim confesses that he helped to rig Haynes's roulette wheels, but states that Haynes framed him when he would no longer cooperate. The next day, during the race, Haynes's riders employ a variety of dirty tricks in an effort to beat Roy, but Roy prevails and wins. Wooster is thrilled to learn that Roy rode his horses and forgets his anger toward the cowboy. Meanwhile, Roy proves that Pete is the holdup man because he has a gunshot wound, but just as Pete is about to reveal that Haynes put him up to his crimes, Haynes shoots him. Roy shoots and wounds Haynes, and soon after, the crooked gambler is held for trial. Wooster, who has enthusiastically embraced his Western roots, hosts a barbecue at his ranch, and watches with pride as Roy and Jackie sing together. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.