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HISTORY

The 9 Dec 1922 Exhibitors Trade Review reported that production was nearing completion. The “prehistoric set” featured in the picture served as a banquet hall to entertain visiting Paramount Pictures distribution representatives. On 23 Dec 1922, Exhibitors Trade Review announced that Adam’s Rib was among Paramount’s “Super 39” releases for 1923. A full-page advertisement in the Dec 1922 – Feb 1923 Exhibitors Trade Review compared the film to director Cecil B. DeMille’s previous release, Manslaughter (1922, see entry), claiming that it examines “the modern girl” from a different perspective. The production would also include life-sized dinosaur skeletons and sequences depicting prehistoric life. The 21 Feb 1923 FD noted that one of the color sequences featured a ballroom decorated with Japanese lanterns that “reflect various colors.”
       The 3 Feb 1923 Exhibitors Trade Review reported that the Chicago Board of Trade commended DeMille on his recreation of the organization’s grain exchange building. DeMille also received “praise” from Professor R. S. Bassler of the Smithsonian Institution, who supplied technical advice on reproducing the dinosaurs used in the picture.
       Adam’s Rib opened 25 Feb 1923 at the Rivoli Theatre in New York City. According to the 27 Feb 1923 FD, the film broke the previous year’s attendance record, set by Manslaughter. An advertisement in the 31 Mar 1923 Exhibitors Trade Review flaunted the picture’s continued success, claiming that DeMille productions consistently outperformed the competition. However, the 4 Mar 1923 FD dismissed the film as “ten reels of novelty” ... More Less

The 9 Dec 1922 Exhibitors Trade Review reported that production was nearing completion. The “prehistoric set” featured in the picture served as a banquet hall to entertain visiting Paramount Pictures distribution representatives. On 23 Dec 1922, Exhibitors Trade Review announced that Adam’s Rib was among Paramount’s “Super 39” releases for 1923. A full-page advertisement in the Dec 1922 – Feb 1923 Exhibitors Trade Review compared the film to director Cecil B. DeMille’s previous release, Manslaughter (1922, see entry), claiming that it examines “the modern girl” from a different perspective. The production would also include life-sized dinosaur skeletons and sequences depicting prehistoric life. The 21 Feb 1923 FD noted that one of the color sequences featured a ballroom decorated with Japanese lanterns that “reflect various colors.”
       The 3 Feb 1923 Exhibitors Trade Review reported that the Chicago Board of Trade commended DeMille on his recreation of the organization’s grain exchange building. DeMille also received “praise” from Professor R. S. Bassler of the Smithsonian Institution, who supplied technical advice on reproducing the dinosaurs used in the picture.
       Adam’s Rib opened 25 Feb 1923 at the Rivoli Theatre in New York City. According to the 27 Feb 1923 FD, the film broke the previous year’s attendance record, set by Manslaughter. An advertisement in the 31 Mar 1923 Exhibitors Trade Review flaunted the picture’s continued success, claiming that DeMille productions consistently outperformed the competition. However, the 4 Mar 1923 FD dismissed the film as “ten reels of novelty” highlighted by lavish sets.
       The 1 Dec 1922 Var noted that composer Aubrey Stuffer wrote a song based on the film.
More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Trade Review
9 Dec 1922
p. 71.
Exhibitors Trade Review
23 Dec 1922
p. 181.
Exhibitors Trade Review
Dec 1922-Feb 1923
p. 5.
Exhibitors Trade Review
3 Feb 1923
p. 493.
Exhibitors Trade Review
10 Feb 1923
p. 549.
Exhibitors Trade Review
31 Mar 1923
Cover.
Film Daily
20 Feb 1923
p. 2.
Film Daily
21 Feb 1923
p. 3.
Film Daily
27 Feb 1923
p. 4.
Film Daily
4 Mar 1923
p. 4.
Moving Picture World
25 Nov 1922
p. 332.
Moving Picture World
23 Dec 1922
p. 738.
Variety
1 Dec 1922
p. 38.
DETAILS
Release Date:
5 March 1923
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles premiere: 4 February 1923
New York opening: 25 February 1923
Production Date:
completed December 1922
Copyright Claimant:
Famous Players-Lasky Corp.
Copyright Date:
7 February 1923
Copyright Number:
LP18658
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black & white with color sequences
b&w with col seq
Length(in feet):
9,526
Length(in reels):
10
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Mrs. Michael Ramsay, neglected by her Chicago wheatbroker husband and her daughter, Mathilda, meets and falls in love with Monsieur Jaromir, the deposed King of Morania. Although Mathilda is in love with Professor Reade, she tries to save her mother by luring away the king and finds herself in compromising circumstances, while Michael Ramsay arranges to buy Morania's wheat if the king should return to the throne. Mrs. Ramsay realizes the impropriety of her conduct and returns to her husband; Reade perceives the truth and is gladly reunited with Mathilda; Jaromir returns to his throne; and failure of the American wheat crop brings a fortune to Ramsay. A similar story is worked out in prehistoric ... +


Mrs. Michael Ramsay, neglected by her Chicago wheatbroker husband and her daughter, Mathilda, meets and falls in love with Monsieur Jaromir, the deposed King of Morania. Although Mathilda is in love with Professor Reade, she tries to save her mother by luring away the king and finds herself in compromising circumstances, while Michael Ramsay arranges to buy Morania's wheat if the king should return to the throne. Mrs. Ramsay realizes the impropriety of her conduct and returns to her husband; Reade perceives the truth and is gladly reunited with Mathilda; Jaromir returns to his throne; and failure of the American wheat crop brings a fortune to Ramsay. A similar story is worked out in prehistoric settings. +

GENRE
Genre:
Sub-genre:
Society


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.