Texas Panhandle (1945)

58 mins | Western | 20 December 1945

Director:

Ray Nazarro

Writer:

Ed Earl Repp

Producer:

Colbert Clark

Cinematographer:

George Kelley

Editor:

Paul Borofsky

Production Designer:

Charles Clague

Production Company:

Columbia Pictures Corp.
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HISTORY

This film opens with the following prologue: "Before 1890 when the surveys were made to determine the boundary lines of Texas, a large part of the Panhandle became known as no man's land. Into this lawless territory flocked bands of outlaws and land grabbers who stopped at nothing to rob and defraud incoming homesteaders---" For additional information on "The Durango Kid" series, please consult the Series Index and see the entry above for The Return of the Durango Kid ... More Less

This film opens with the following prologue: "Before 1890 when the surveys were made to determine the boundary lines of Texas, a large part of the Panhandle became known as no man's land. Into this lawless territory flocked bands of outlaws and land grabbers who stopped at nothing to rob and defraud incoming homesteaders---" For additional information on "The Durango Kid" series, please consult the Series Index and see the entry above for The Return of the Durango Kid . More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
29 Dec 1945.
---
Daily Variety
4 Jan 46
p. 3.
Film Daily
3 Jun 46
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Jan 46
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
1 Dec 45
p. 2744.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
12 Jan 46
p. 2795.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
PRODUCER
WRITER
Orig scr, Orig scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
2d cam
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SOUND
Sd eng
Mus mixer
PRODUCTION MISC
Research dir
SOURCES
SONGS
"I Love to Yodel," words and music by Helen Hagstrom
"Heavenly Range," words and music by Spade Cooley and Smokey Rogers
"Take Me Back to Tulsa," words and music by Bob Wills and Tommy Duncan
+
SONGS
"I Love to Yodel," words and music by Helen Hagstrom
"Heavenly Range," words and music by Spade Cooley and Smokey Rogers
"Take Me Back to Tulsa," words and music by Bob Wills and Tommy Duncan
"At Sunset," words and music by Mario Silva and Serge Walter.
+
DETAILS
Series:
Release Date:
20 December 1945
Production Date:
30 April--9 May 1945
Copyright Claimant:
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
20 December 1945
Copyright Number:
LP58
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
58
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
10930
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In 1890, lawlessness reigns in the Texas panhandle as renegade bands attack incoming homesteaders and a wagon-load of government gold is stolen by outlaws. In Washington, D.C., Secret Service agent Steve Buckner eagerly anticipates being assigned to recover the stolen gold. Instead, Steve is informed by his superior, James Harrington, that he is to be suspended because of rumors that he is the masked rider known as The Durango Kid. Angrily, Steve throws down his credentials and rides West to join a wagon train headed for San Antonio and led by Tex Harding and Cannonball Taylor. While out scouting one day, Cannonball is attacked by renegades. Steve, disguised as The Durango Kid stops the attack, captures the fleeing assailants and turns them over to Cannonball who takes them back to the wagon train. There, Slash, one of the outlaws, grabs a gun from a homesteader, arms his comrades and then orders the wagons to head for Crow Springs. Meanwhile, in Crow Springs, real estate developer Ace Galatin informs Ann Williams, whose late uncle owned all the territory in the valley, that her uncle died intestate and therefore the valley must be opened to settlers. In reality, Galatin is no friend of Ann's and intends to claim the land for himself. Soon after, Slash delivers the settlers to Crow Springs and Galatin orders them to register the land and then turn their quick claim deeds over to him. When Galatin learns that Steve holds a law degree, he enlists his help in making the operation legal. Later, disguised as The Durango Kid, Steve eavesdrops at Galatin's window as the developer ... +


In 1890, lawlessness reigns in the Texas panhandle as renegade bands attack incoming homesteaders and a wagon-load of government gold is stolen by outlaws. In Washington, D.C., Secret Service agent Steve Buckner eagerly anticipates being assigned to recover the stolen gold. Instead, Steve is informed by his superior, James Harrington, that he is to be suspended because of rumors that he is the masked rider known as The Durango Kid. Angrily, Steve throws down his credentials and rides West to join a wagon train headed for San Antonio and led by Tex Harding and Cannonball Taylor. While out scouting one day, Cannonball is attacked by renegades. Steve, disguised as The Durango Kid stops the attack, captures the fleeing assailants and turns them over to Cannonball who takes them back to the wagon train. There, Slash, one of the outlaws, grabs a gun from a homesteader, arms his comrades and then orders the wagons to head for Crow Springs. Meanwhile, in Crow Springs, real estate developer Ace Galatin informs Ann Williams, whose late uncle owned all the territory in the valley, that her uncle died intestate and therefore the valley must be opened to settlers. In reality, Galatin is no friend of Ann's and intends to claim the land for himself. Soon after, Slash delivers the settlers to Crow Springs and Galatin orders them to register the land and then turn their quick claim deeds over to him. When Galatin learns that Steve holds a law degree, he enlists his help in making the operation legal. Later, disguised as The Durango Kid, Steve eavesdrops at Galatin's window as the developer opens a letter addressed to Ann and finds her uncle's will inside, deeding her the entire valley. As Galatin is about to set the document on fire, Steve bursts into the office, snatches the will from his hands and gallops away on his white steed. Galatin sends one of his men to Ann's ranch to warn Slash to be on the lookout for The Durango Kid, and when Tex, who is clearing brush on the ranch under Slash's supervision, learns of Steve's peril, he escapes to warn him. Meanwhile, in town, Steve has changed back into his own clothes and tells Galatin that he is taking the deeds to his hotel room to put them in legal order. After Steve rides again as The Durango Kid, he appears in town, disheveled, and claims that The Durango Kid attacked him and stole the deeds. Later, Steve blows up Galatin's safe and finds the gold hidden inside. After chasing the disguised Steve away, Galatin melts down the gold and hides it in the blacksmith shop. There, he finds Steve's horse and saddle concealed behind some stacks of hay. When Galatin discovers a citation in the saddlebags, identifying Steve as a Secret Service agent, he confronts him in the saloon. Outside, Cannonball and Tex overhear Galatin's accusations and distract the outlaw by throwing a rock through the window. Steve seizes the opportunity to escape and is joined by Cannonball and Tex. After restoring the settlers' guns to Tex and Cannonball, Steve instructs them to assemble homesteader Spade and his boys and meet him at the old mine. Jumping on his white steed, Steve gallops out of town, pursued by Galatin's men. After losing his pursuers, Steve meets Cannonball and the boys at the mine. When Cannonball hands him his saddle and mask, Steve dons the disguise of The Durango Kid and rides to Ann's ranch to inform her about her uncle's will. As Steve relays the news to Ann, Galatin and his men arrive and are about to rip the mask from The Steve's face when Tex and the others appear, guns blazing. After driving away Galatin's men, Steve formulates a plan to reclaim the gold. Instructing Tex and Cannonball to round up a herd of stray horses, Steve drives the animals into town. Under cover of the stampede, The Durango Kid gallops into town, enters the blacksmith shop, arrests Galatin and recovers the gold. For his feats, Steve is reinstated as a government agent, and all ends happily as Ann offers to let the settlers keep the lands that they have claimed. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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