Young Widow (1946)

98-100 mins | Drama | 1 March 1946

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HISTORY

Clarissa Fairchild Cushman's novel was first published in Good Housekeeping (Feb--Jun 1941). The above credits were taken from a cutting continuity. Jane Russell was loaned to Hunt Stromberg by independent producer and businessman Howard Hughes. This was her first motion picture appearance since Hughes' film The Outlaw (for more information on that film See Entry). The film also marked the motion picture debut of Faith Domergue, another Hughes protegée. According to a 21 Feb 1945 HR news item, Ida Lupino started production in the title role, and William Dieterle directed for the first two weeks. On 19 Apr 1945, HR reported that filming was starting at General Service under Dieterle's direction. The extent of his contribution to the final film, if any, is undetermined. Marie McDonald and Spring Byington were also included in early cast lists, but they do not appear later on.
       A May 1945 article in NYT adds the following information about the production: Joan Fontaine was suspended from Stromberg's company when she refused to substitute for Lupino. Production on the film stopped for eight weeks for story revisions after Lupino left the film. Subsequently, Andre de Toth was assigned to direct. HR production charts add the following actors to the cast: Cordell Hickman, Gail Writte, Louise Beavers, Leigh Whipper, Gerald Mohr and Betty Newling. Their appearance in the released picture has not been confirmed, however. On 25 Nov 1952, HR reported that the film was being reissued under the title The Naughty Widow ... More Less

Clarissa Fairchild Cushman's novel was first published in Good Housekeeping (Feb--Jun 1941). The above credits were taken from a cutting continuity. Jane Russell was loaned to Hunt Stromberg by independent producer and businessman Howard Hughes. This was her first motion picture appearance since Hughes' film The Outlaw (for more information on that film See Entry). The film also marked the motion picture debut of Faith Domergue, another Hughes protegée. According to a 21 Feb 1945 HR news item, Ida Lupino started production in the title role, and William Dieterle directed for the first two weeks. On 19 Apr 1945, HR reported that filming was starting at General Service under Dieterle's direction. The extent of his contribution to the final film, if any, is undetermined. Marie McDonald and Spring Byington were also included in early cast lists, but they do not appear later on.
       A May 1945 article in NYT adds the following information about the production: Joan Fontaine was suspended from Stromberg's company when she refused to substitute for Lupino. Production on the film stopped for eight weeks for story revisions after Lupino left the film. Subsequently, Andre de Toth was assigned to direct. HR production charts add the following actors to the cast: Cordell Hickman, Gail Writte, Louise Beavers, Leigh Whipper, Gerald Mohr and Betty Newling. Their appearance in the released picture has not been confirmed, however. On 25 Nov 1952, HR reported that the film was being reissued under the title The Naughty Widow . More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
23 Feb 1946.
---
Daily Variety
21 Feb 1945.
---
Daily Variety
19 Feb 46
p. 3.
Film Daily
28 Feb 46
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Nov 1944.
---
Hollywood Reporter
16 Feb 45
p. 15.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Mar 45
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Apr 45
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Apr 45
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Jun 45
p. 17.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Feb 46
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Aug 46
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Nov 1952.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
14 May 45
p. 2454.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
23 Feb 46
pp. 2857-58.
New York Times
6 May 1945.
---
New York Times
29 Jul 46
p. 12.
Variety
20 Feb 46
p. 8.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des and art dir
Asst art dir
FILM EDITORS
Supv film ed
Film ed
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus score
SOUND
MAKEUP
Makeup
PRODUCTION MISC
Exec asst to Hunt Stromberg
Prod mgr
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Young Widow by Clarissa Fairchild Cushman (Boston, 1942).
DETAILS
Release Date:
1 March 1946
Production Date:
mid February--late March
mid April--late June 1945
Copyright Claimant:
Special Productions, Inc.
Copyright Date:
1 March 1946
Copyright Number:
LP142
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
98-100
Length(in feet):
9,011
Country:
United States
PCA No:
11207
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

Joan Kenwood, whose husband Barry was killed during the war, returns home to New York from England. She is met at the dock by her old friend, Peter Waring, the managing editor of the newspaper for which both she and Barry worked. Peter offers Joan her old job, but she turns him down and instead stays with her two aunts on their Virginia farm. Still haunted by memories of Barry, however, Joan decides to return to New York. On the train, young lieutenant Jim Cameron makes a pass at her, but Joan rebuffs him. In New York, Joan stays with her friend, Peg Martin, whose husband Bill is on a submarine in the South Pacific. Peg also shares her apartment with Mac, a man-crazy show girl who has just returned from entertaining the troops. By accident, Jim learns where Joan is staying, and drops by the apartment along with a number of other sailors and soldiers invited by Mac. Later, everyone goes out to a café. While Jim and Joan are dancing, Barry's favorite song is played, and a distraught Joan leaves the café. Jim follows and takes her home. When he bluntly suggests that she get over the man she is in love with, Joan explains that the man is her husband, who was killed over Berlin. Ashamed, Jim returns to his base. The next day, as Joan is leaving the apartment, she encounters a remorseful Jim. After she accepts his apology, Jim accompanies her to the subway. While waiting for the train, Jim saves the life of a woman who falls on the ... +


Joan Kenwood, whose husband Barry was killed during the war, returns home to New York from England. She is met at the dock by her old friend, Peter Waring, the managing editor of the newspaper for which both she and Barry worked. Peter offers Joan her old job, but she turns him down and instead stays with her two aunts on their Virginia farm. Still haunted by memories of Barry, however, Joan decides to return to New York. On the train, young lieutenant Jim Cameron makes a pass at her, but Joan rebuffs him. In New York, Joan stays with her friend, Peg Martin, whose husband Bill is on a submarine in the South Pacific. Peg also shares her apartment with Mac, a man-crazy show girl who has just returned from entertaining the troops. By accident, Jim learns where Joan is staying, and drops by the apartment along with a number of other sailors and soldiers invited by Mac. Later, everyone goes out to a café. While Jim and Joan are dancing, Barry's favorite song is played, and a distraught Joan leaves the café. Jim follows and takes her home. When he bluntly suggests that she get over the man she is in love with, Joan explains that the man is her husband, who was killed over Berlin. Ashamed, Jim returns to his base. The next day, as Joan is leaving the apartment, she encounters a remorseful Jim. After she accepts his apology, Jim accompanies her to the subway. While waiting for the train, Jim saves the life of a woman who falls on the tracks. Joan's reporter instincts take over, and she writes the story for the paper. Delighted, Peter promptly puts her on the payroll. The following week, Joan invites Jim and some other friends to the apartment for dinner. Among the guests is an engaged couple, Bob Johnson and Gerry Taylor. Bob is about to join the Army, and Gerry, who is afraid of becoming a widow, wants to break their engagement. Joan persuades her not to desert Bob, but to marry him so that he will have something to come home to. Some time later, Jim receives a telegram ordering him to report for cholera shots. That night he proposes to Joan, but Joan, who is not yet over Barry's death, sadly replies that she will never love him. A few days later, Bill returns, having lost a leg in the war, and moved by seeing him with Peg, Joan decides to tell Jim that she will wait for him. Peter drives her to the airfield, but before they arrive, Jim's plane takes off for the Pacific. Although she realizes that she is not really ready for a new relationship, Joan knows in her heart that when she is ready, Jim will return to her. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.