Bells of San Angelo (1947)

71 or 78 mins | Western, Musical | 22 May 1947

Director:

William Witney

Writer:

Sloan Nibley

Cinematographer:

Jack Marta

Editor:

Les Orlebeck

Production Designers:

Gano Chittenden, Frank Arrigo

Production Company:

Republic Pictures Corp.
Full page view
HISTORY

A HR news item reported that three weeks of location shooting in Las Vegas was postponed due to heavy snow. The HR review incorrectly stated that Bells of San Angelo was Dale Evans' last feature opposite Roy Rogers. Their last western together was Republic's 1951 South of Caliente . Contemporary sources include Lyle Talbot in the cast, but his appearance in the released film has not been confirmed. Modern sources include Silver Harr, Buck Bucko and Dale Van Sickel in the ... More Less

A HR news item reported that three weeks of location shooting in Las Vegas was postponed due to heavy snow. The HR review incorrectly stated that Bells of San Angelo was Dale Evans' last feature opposite Roy Rogers. Their last western together was Republic's 1951 South of Caliente . Contemporary sources include Lyle Talbot in the cast, but his appearance in the released film has not been confirmed. Modern sources include Silver Harr, Buck Bucko and Dale Van Sickel in the cast. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
31 May 1947.
---
Daily Variety
22 May 1947.
---
Film Daily
22 May 47
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Nov 46
p. 15.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Jan 47
p. 19.
Hollywood Reporter
22 May 47
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Nov 47
p. 13.
Independent Film Journal
4 Jan 47
p. 35.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
31 May 1947.
---
Variety
22 May 47
p. 3.
Variety
28 May 47
p. 20.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Orig story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Supv art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set des
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOUND
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Makeup supv
SOURCES
SONGS
"Hot Lead" and "Lazy Days," words and music by Tim Spencer
"Cowboy's Dream of Heaven," "I Love the West," "I Like to Get Up Early in the Morning" and "The Bells of San Angelo," words and music by Jack Elliott.
DETAILS
Release Date:
22 May 1947
Production Date:
late November--mid January 1947
Copyright Claimant:
Republic Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
7 May 1947
Copyright Number:
LP1000
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Color
Trucolor
Duration(in mins):
71 or 78
Country:
United States
PCA No:
12259
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

As he rides into Rancho San Angelo, a territory located both in Mexico and America, border investigator Roy Rogers is greeted by his friend, "Cookie" Bullfincher, the town's mayor and sheriff, and Cookie's friend, the padre. Roy has come to investigate a series of murders perpetrated at the nearby Monarch Silver Mine. While riding to the mine, Roy sees a man get shot while trying to escape from mine guards working for manager Rex Gridley and his partner, Gus Ulrich. When Roy reaches the body, he discovers a chunk of pure silver ore that was planted by Gridley and Ulrich. Later, at Rancho San Angelo, Cookie accuses Ulrich of murder, but he explains that Gridley gave orders to shoot any thieves found at the mine. Roy then receives a letter announcing that the famous writer of western novels, Lee Madison, is coming to town the next day. When she arrives on the bus, however, Lee is not recognized by Roy's men because they expect a man. Overhearing them say that Roy does not want Madison around, she tells them that her name is "Helen Clifford," and they give her a lift to the hotel. On the way, Roy ambushes the stage to prove to Madison that the real West is dangerous, but lets Lee go when he sees she is a woman. At the hotel, Lee asks Roy to read one of Madison's books, suggesting that it might give him some clues to his murder investigation. After Ulrich and his men leave to check the mine, Cookie follows and discovers that they are actually smuggling pure silver ore from the ... +


As he rides into Rancho San Angelo, a territory located both in Mexico and America, border investigator Roy Rogers is greeted by his friend, "Cookie" Bullfincher, the town's mayor and sheriff, and Cookie's friend, the padre. Roy has come to investigate a series of murders perpetrated at the nearby Monarch Silver Mine. While riding to the mine, Roy sees a man get shot while trying to escape from mine guards working for manager Rex Gridley and his partner, Gus Ulrich. When Roy reaches the body, he discovers a chunk of pure silver ore that was planted by Gridley and Ulrich. Later, at Rancho San Angelo, Cookie accuses Ulrich of murder, but he explains that Gridley gave orders to shoot any thieves found at the mine. Roy then receives a letter announcing that the famous writer of western novels, Lee Madison, is coming to town the next day. When she arrives on the bus, however, Lee is not recognized by Roy's men because they expect a man. Overhearing them say that Roy does not want Madison around, she tells them that her name is "Helen Clifford," and they give her a lift to the hotel. On the way, Roy ambushes the stage to prove to Madison that the real West is dangerous, but lets Lee go when he sees she is a woman. At the hotel, Lee asks Roy to read one of Madison's books, suggesting that it might give him some clues to his murder investigation. After Ulrich and his men leave to check the mine, Cookie follows and discovers that they are actually smuggling pure silver ore from the Mexican side of the mine to the American side, where it can be sold at high prices. When Ulrich and his men find a young Mexican man, Ignacio, snooping around the mine, they shoot him and hide his body in the mine. Soon after, Roy and Cookie go to check out the mine, and as they leave, Roy's horse Trigger gets a piece of silver ore stuck in his hoof. At San Angelo, meanwhile, English solicitor Lionel Bates inquires about a man called George Wallingford Lancaster, explaining that Scotland Yard is looking for him, a fact that terrifies Cookie. Bates also declares that the ranch at San Angelo soon will have a new owner. Later, Roy analyzes the ore found in Trigger's hoof and informs Cookie that it is mostly lead with only a trace of silver, whereas the ore found on the murdered man was pure. The next morning, Bates conducts a fox hunt, using an opossum instead of a fox. Gridley joins the hunt and he and his men pistol whip Bates. Soon after, Roy realizes that the pure silver is being smuggled into the American side of the mine and brings Lee and Cookie there to investigate. When they discover Ignacio's body, Roy sends Lee back to town, but Gridley kidnaps her. Seeing a riderless Trigger, the ranchers follow the horse back to the mine, where Gridley's men have started a shootout. After the ranchers capture most of the mine workers, Roy chases Gridley into the mountains, but stops when the mine owner threatens to kill Lee. Lee and Roy then re-enact the death scene on "page 77" of her novel Murder on the Border , which fools Gridley into thinking that Lee has been shot and allows Roy to knock him out. A few days after Gridley is arrested, Bates reveals that he has discovered that Cookie is really Lancaster and is the heir to the Rancho San Angelo territory. Lee then informs Roy that she plans to call her next book The Bells of San Angelo . +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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