Dark Passage (1947)

106 mins | Film noir | 27 September 1947

Director:

Delmer Daves

Writer:

Delmer Daves

Producer:

Jerry Wald

Cinematographer:

Sid Hickox

Editor:

David Weisbart

Production Designer:

Charles H. Clarke

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

According to a 17 Sep 1945 HR news item, Warner Bros. paid $25,000 for the rights to the David Goodis novel, which was serialized in The Saturday Evening Post from 20 Jul--7 Sep 1946. Some scenes were shot on location in San Francisco, and many reviews noted the effective use of the city in the background footage. According to modern sources, "Irene's" house was torn down following the 1989 Loma Prieta ... More Less

According to a 17 Sep 1945 HR news item, Warner Bros. paid $25,000 for the rights to the David Goodis novel, which was serialized in The Saturday Evening Post from 20 Jul--7 Sep 1946. Some scenes were shot on location in San Francisco, and many reviews noted the effective use of the city in the background footage. According to modern sources, "Irene's" house was torn down following the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
6 Sep 1947.
---
Daily Variety
3 Sep 1947.
---
Film Daily
3 Sep 47
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Sep 46
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Sep 46
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
31 Jan 47
p. 19
Hollywood Reporter
3 Sep 47
p. 3.
Independent Film Journal
4 Jan 47
p. 35.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
6 Sep 47
p. 3817.
New York Times
6 Sep 47
p. 11.
Variety
3 Sep 47
p. 16.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Warner Bros.--First National Picture
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Spec eff photog
ART DIRECTOR
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Orch arr
Mus dir
SOUND
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Dark Passage by David Goodis (New York, 1946).
AUTHOR
SONGS
"Too Marvelous for Words," music and lyrics by Johnny Mercer and Richard A. Whiting.
DETAILS
Release Date:
27 September 1947
Premiere Information:
New York opening: week of 6 September 1947
Production Date:
late October 1946--late January 1947
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
27 September 1947
Copyright Number:
LP1232
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
106
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Convicted wife-murderer Vincent Parry escapes from San Quentin in the back of a garbage truck. He hitches a ride with a man named Baker, but when the announcement of his escape is broadcast over the car radio, Vincent knocks out Baker and steals his clothes. While he is hiding the unconscious man, painter Irene Jansen stops her car nearby. Although Vincent does not know Irene, she knows his name and offers to help him. At her apartment in San Francisco, Irene explains that she followed his trial carefully because her father, who died in prison, was wrongly convicted of his wife's murder, and she believes Vincent is also innocent. While Irene shops for new clothes for Vincent, a woman knocks on the door, and Vincent recognizes her voice as belonging to Madge Rapf, the shrewish friend of his dead wife whose testimony was responsible for his conviction. Irene later reveals that she is dating Madge's former fiancé, Bob. That night, Vincent leaves Irene's apartment, planning to look for evidence on the real murderer. He is picked up by Sam, a taxi driver, who recognizes him and offers to introduce him to plastic surgeon Walter Coley. Vincent waits for his appointment at the apartment of his only friend, musician George Fellsinger. When the operation is over, Vincent returns to George's, planning to stay there until his face is healed, but he discovers that George has been murdered in the meantime. Not knowing where else to go, Vincent walks to Irene's. Outside her apartment, he sees Baker's car, but decides that its presence is only a coincidence. ... +


Convicted wife-murderer Vincent Parry escapes from San Quentin in the back of a garbage truck. He hitches a ride with a man named Baker, but when the announcement of his escape is broadcast over the car radio, Vincent knocks out Baker and steals his clothes. While he is hiding the unconscious man, painter Irene Jansen stops her car nearby. Although Vincent does not know Irene, she knows his name and offers to help him. At her apartment in San Francisco, Irene explains that she followed his trial carefully because her father, who died in prison, was wrongly convicted of his wife's murder, and she believes Vincent is also innocent. While Irene shops for new clothes for Vincent, a woman knocks on the door, and Vincent recognizes her voice as belonging to Madge Rapf, the shrewish friend of his dead wife whose testimony was responsible for his conviction. Irene later reveals that she is dating Madge's former fiancé, Bob. That night, Vincent leaves Irene's apartment, planning to look for evidence on the real murderer. He is picked up by Sam, a taxi driver, who recognizes him and offers to introduce him to plastic surgeon Walter Coley. Vincent waits for his appointment at the apartment of his only friend, musician George Fellsinger. When the operation is over, Vincent returns to George's, planning to stay there until his face is healed, but he discovers that George has been murdered in the meantime. Not knowing where else to go, Vincent walks to Irene's. Outside her apartment, he sees Baker's car, but decides that its presence is only a coincidence. Irene and Vincent soon learn that he has been accused of George's murder. Once his face is healed, Vincent, using the name Alan Lynell, again sets off to prove his innocence. He checks into a hotel where Baker accosts him and demands $60,000 in blackmail. When Vincent protests that he has no money, Baker informs him that Irene is wealthy and insists that Vincent drive him to Irene's apartment. During the drive, Baker tells Vincent that he can get a fake passport at a town in Arizona. Before they get to Irene's, Vincent overcomes Baker and questions him. He learns that he was followed to George's apartment by someone in an orange convertible. Then the two men struggle, and Baker falls to his death over a cliff. Vincent next visits Madge, who owns an orange convertible, and accuses her of murdering his wife and George. Madge admits that she killed Vincent's wife because she was in love with him, and when he rejected her, she framed him for the murder. Vincent asks Madge to sign a confession, but she refuses and jumps to her death. With Madge's death, there is no way for Vincent to prove his innocence. He telephones Irene and asks her to meet him at a certain town in Peru, and one day, much later, she does. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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