Honeymoon (1947)

74 mins | Romantic comedy | 17 May 1947

Director:

William Keighley

Producer:

Warren Duff

Cinematographer:

Edward Cronjager

Editor:

Ralph Dawson

Production Designers:

Albert D'Agostino, Ralph Berger

Production Company:

RKO Radio Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

RKO borrowed Guy Madison and Shirley Temple from David O. Selznick's company for this production. HR news items add the following information about the production: Joseph Cotten was first cast in the role of "David Flanner," but turned down the part because he felt he was too old to be linked romantically with Temple's character. As a result of his refusal, Cotten was put on suspension by Selznick. In onscreen credits Julian Villarreal's name is misspelled as "Villareal."
       In early Mar 1946, RKO announced that the film was to be shot in and around its new Churubusco studios near Mexico City. Because of a workers' strike in the Mexican film industry, however, the production remained in Hollywood until mid-Apr 1946. At that time, the cast and crew were scheduled to shoot for twenty-two days in and around the Mexican studio. Over two hundred Spanish-speaking extras were hired to appear in the film. Director William Keighley was to assist in the editing, and producer David Hempstead was borrowed from Selznick's company to supervise the editing. Alfonso Sánchez Tello is credited in HR as "helping" the film's second unit in Mexico City, but the exact nature of his contribution is not known. Modern sources note that the picture cost $1,739,000 to produce and lost $675,000 at the box ... More Less

RKO borrowed Guy Madison and Shirley Temple from David O. Selznick's company for this production. HR news items add the following information about the production: Joseph Cotten was first cast in the role of "David Flanner," but turned down the part because he felt he was too old to be linked romantically with Temple's character. As a result of his refusal, Cotten was put on suspension by Selznick. In onscreen credits Julian Villarreal's name is misspelled as "Villareal."
       In early Mar 1946, RKO announced that the film was to be shot in and around its new Churubusco studios near Mexico City. Because of a workers' strike in the Mexican film industry, however, the production remained in Hollywood until mid-Apr 1946. At that time, the cast and crew were scheduled to shoot for twenty-two days in and around the Mexican studio. Over two hundred Spanish-speaking extras were hired to appear in the film. Director William Keighley was to assist in the editing, and producer David Hempstead was borrowed from Selznick's company to supervise the editing. Alfonso Sánchez Tello is credited in HR as "helping" the film's second unit in Mexico City, but the exact nature of his contribution is not known. Modern sources note that the picture cost $1,739,000 to produce and lost $675,000 at the box office. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
19 Apr 1947.
---
Daily Variety
15 Apr 1947.
---
Film Daily
21 Apr 47
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Feb 46
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Mar 46
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Mar 46
p. 16.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Mar 46
p. 16.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Mar 46
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Mar 46
p. 13.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Apr 46
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Apr 46
p. 17.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Apr 46
p. 3, 12
Hollywood Reporter
21 Jun 46
p. 16.
Hollywood Reporter
28 Jun 46
p. 19.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Sep 46
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Oct 46
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Apr 47
p. 3.
Independent Film Journal
30 Mar 46
p. 46.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
19 Apr 1947.
---
New York Times
19 May 47
p. 27.
Variety
16 Apr 47
p. 8.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Martín Garralaga
Israel García
Ralph Navarro Norwood
Joe Domínguez
George Treviño
Mike Rodríguez
Augie Gómez
Lupe González
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A William Keighley Picture
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
WRITERS
Story
Contr to dial
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Supv ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus dir
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
DANCE
Dance dir
MAKEUP
Makeup supv
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Franchot Tone's Spanish language coach
SOURCES
SONGS
"I Love Geraniums" and "Ven aqui," music by Leigh Harline, lyrics by Mort Greene.
DETAILS
Release Date:
17 May 1947
Production Date:
late March--late June 1946
addl seq began early September 1946
Copyright Claimant:
RKO Radio Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
10 May 1947
Copyright Number:
LP1071
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
74
Length(in feet):
6,632
Country:
United States
PCA No:
11593
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Midwestern teenager Barbara Ohmstead arrives in Mexico City and is disappointed when Corporal Phil Vaughn, who is flying in from Panama to marry her, fails to appear at the train station. At the American consulate, Barbara learns from David Flanner, the overworked vice consul, that Phil's flight has been delayed until tomorrow. Moments after Barbara leaves David's office to find a hotel, however, Phil shows up, having caught a last-minute military flight. Phil, who tells David that he fell in love with Barbara when she accidentally dove on top of him in a swimming pool, determines to find and marry her before his two-day pass expires. Barbara, meanwhile, has no luck securing accommodations and seeks help from David, who is attending his fiancée Rachel Mendoza's harp recital. Before David can say no, an exhausted Barbara faints from hunger. Feeling sorry for the teenager, David takes her to a nice restaurant and is seen dancing the jitterbug with her by Rachel's conservative father, Don Gaspar. Embarrassed, David rushes Barbara to his hotel, but because no rooms are available, she decides to go to Xochimilco, where she and Phil were supposed to spend their wedding night. Concerned for Barbara's safety, David accompanies her there, and the two enjoy a romantic boat ride together. When David suddenly remembers he has a dinner date with Rachel, however, he falls into the water and must replace his soaking wet suit with traditional Mexican attire. David then hides to avoid being spotted by a friend of Rachel's, and Barbara, unaware of the friend, angrily runs off. David chases after her and is slugged by Phil, who ... +


Midwestern teenager Barbara Ohmstead arrives in Mexico City and is disappointed when Corporal Phil Vaughn, who is flying in from Panama to marry her, fails to appear at the train station. At the American consulate, Barbara learns from David Flanner, the overworked vice consul, that Phil's flight has been delayed until tomorrow. Moments after Barbara leaves David's office to find a hotel, however, Phil shows up, having caught a last-minute military flight. Phil, who tells David that he fell in love with Barbara when she accidentally dove on top of him in a swimming pool, determines to find and marry her before his two-day pass expires. Barbara, meanwhile, has no luck securing accommodations and seeks help from David, who is attending his fiancée Rachel Mendoza's harp recital. Before David can say no, an exhausted Barbara faints from hunger. Feeling sorry for the teenager, David takes her to a nice restaurant and is seen dancing the jitterbug with her by Rachel's conservative father, Don Gaspar. Embarrassed, David rushes Barbara to his hotel, but because no rooms are available, she decides to go to Xochimilco, where she and Phil were supposed to spend their wedding night. Concerned for Barbara's safety, David accompanies her there, and the two enjoy a romantic boat ride together. When David suddenly remembers he has a dinner date with Rachel, however, he falls into the water and must replace his soaking wet suit with traditional Mexican attire. David then hides to avoid being spotted by a friend of Rachel's, and Barbara, unaware of the friend, angrily runs off. David chases after her and is slugged by Phil, who has just arrived and mistakes him for a masher. After they spend the night with David in his hotel room, the would-be newlyweds rush to the courthouse, but are told they need a health certificate to marry and will have to wait to get one as all of the doctors in Mexico City are attending a conference. Undaunted, Barbara and Phil go to the conference and try to explain their predicament to a doctor, but as he speaks only Spanish, he has no idea what they are requesting. When Barbara's subsequent insult is misintrepreted as a compliment, however, the flattered doctor signs their certificate. Armed with the certificate, Barbara and Phil return to the courthouse, but are informed by an enterprising Mexican that they need four witnesses. After paying for their witnesses, the couple finds a willing judge, but he tells Barbara, who falsified her age on her tourist card, that she is too young to marry without parental consent. At their wit's end, the couple goes to Rachel's family estate, where David is entertaining visiting American politicians. David, whose romance with Rachel is suffering because of Barbara's persistence, promises to help the couple marry outside the country and sends them on their way. The impetuous Barbara, however, argues with Phil and returns to David's garden party. Although David tries to convince Barbara to rejoin Phil, who is hiding in a tree, she refuses to listen and goes for a swim in the Mendozas' pool. When she accidentally dives on top of a passing David, she is momentarily knocked out and awakens madly in love with the diplomat. Now desperate, David finds Phil and sends him to Barbara's room. Barbara, however, is still in love with David and breaks her engagement with Phil. After a heartbroken Phil informs David of his "victory," David threatens to spank Barbara, who screams and brings Phil running. Phil slugs David and throws Barbara into the pool, then dives on top of her. Smitten once again, Barbara finally walks down the aisle with Phil, while David and a forgiving Rachel reunite. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.