I'll Be Yours (1947)

93 or 100 mins | Comedy | January 1947

Director:

William A. Seiter

Producer:

Felix Jackson

Cinematographer:

Hal Mohr

Editor:

Otto Ludwig

Production Designer:

John Goodman
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HISTORY

The film's writing credits read: "Adapted by Felix Jackson from the screenplay "The Good Fairy" by Preston Sturges, based on a comedy by Ferenc Molnár." Sturges' 1935 Universal film The Good Fairy , directed by William Wyler and starring Margaret Sullivan and Herbert Marshall, was also based on Molnár's play (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 ; F3.1678). I'll Be Yours was producer Felix Jackson's last film for Universal. According to an Oct 1946 HR news item, background scenes for the film were shot on location in New York. On 23 Jan 1950, Lux Radio Theatre broadcast a radio version of Jackson's story starring William Bendix and Ann ... More Less

The film's writing credits read: "Adapted by Felix Jackson from the screenplay "The Good Fairy" by Preston Sturges, based on a comedy by Ferenc Molnár." Sturges' 1935 Universal film The Good Fairy , directed by William Wyler and starring Margaret Sullivan and Herbert Marshall, was also based on Molnár's play (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 ; F3.1678). I'll Be Yours was producer Felix Jackson's last film for Universal. According to an Oct 1946 HR news item, background scenes for the film were shot on location in New York. On 23 Jan 1950, Lux Radio Theatre broadcast a radio version of Jackson's story starring William Bendix and Ann Blythe. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
25 Jan 1947.
---
Daily Variety
20 Jan 1947.
---
Film Daily
22 Jan 47
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Aug 46
p. 19.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Oct 46
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Oct 46
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Jan 47
p. 3.
Independent Film Journal
31 Aug 46
p. 39.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
7 Dec 46
p. 3348.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
25 Jan 1947.
---
New York Times
22 Feb 47
p. 16.
Variety
22 Jan 47
p. 17.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITER
Adpt from the screenplay "The Good Fairy" by Prest
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Supv art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus dir for Miss Durbin
Vocal coach
SOUND
Dir of sd
[Sd] tech
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec photog
MAKEUP
Hairstylist
Dir of makeup
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play The Good Fairy by Ferenc Molnár (Budapest, Oct 1931), as adapted and translated by Jane Hinton (New York, 24 Nov 1931).
SONGS
"Granada," words and music by Augustín Lara
"It's Dream Time" and "Cobbleskill School Song," words Jack Brook, music by Walter Schumann
"Love's Own Sweet Song," words by Catherine Chisholm Cushing and E. P. Heath, music by Emmerich Kalman.
DETAILS
Release Date:
January 1947
Production Date:
mid August--mid October 1946
Copyright Claimant:
Universal Pictures Co., inc.
Copyright Date:
18 February 1947
Copyright Number:
LP879
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
93 or 100
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Fresh from the small town of Cobbleskill, young Louise Ginglebusher arrives in New York City. Hungry and on a budget, Louise enters a café, where her order is taken by Wechsberg, her kindhearted but contentious waiter. Feeling sorry for the girl, Wechsberg brings her a turkey sandwich rather than the chicken liver she ordered. While Wechsberg confers about his taxes with his bearded attorney, George Prescott, Louise eyes the bewhiskered barrister. Noticing Louise's interest, Wechsberg introduces her to George and when the waiter learns that her last name is Ginglebusher, he insists that she take George's business card in case she ever decides to change it. After George leaves, Wechsberg sighs that his friend is too honest to earn a decent living. From the café, Louise goes to see Mr. Buckingham, the owner of the prestigious Buckingham Music Hall and an old friend of Louise's father. Buckingham hires Louise as an usher, and while working one day, she meets Wechsberg again when he comes to smoke and watch a movie. Later, as Louise leaves work, she is accosted by a masher. Spotting Wechsberg in the street, Louise claims that he is her husband and dismisses the young man. Wechsberg then walks Louise to her boardinghouse. As they sit on the front porch and discuss their dreams, Wechsberg impetuously invites Louise to an elite social gathering at the Savoy Ritz, at which he is working the following night. When Louise appears at the event in a borrowed gown, Wechsberg advises her to pretend to be a foreigner and mingle. The headwaiter soon discovers that Louise's name is not on the ... +


Fresh from the small town of Cobbleskill, young Louise Ginglebusher arrives in New York City. Hungry and on a budget, Louise enters a café, where her order is taken by Wechsberg, her kindhearted but contentious waiter. Feeling sorry for the girl, Wechsberg brings her a turkey sandwich rather than the chicken liver she ordered. While Wechsberg confers about his taxes with his bearded attorney, George Prescott, Louise eyes the bewhiskered barrister. Noticing Louise's interest, Wechsberg introduces her to George and when the waiter learns that her last name is Ginglebusher, he insists that she take George's business card in case she ever decides to change it. After George leaves, Wechsberg sighs that his friend is too honest to earn a decent living. From the café, Louise goes to see Mr. Buckingham, the owner of the prestigious Buckingham Music Hall and an old friend of Louise's father. Buckingham hires Louise as an usher, and while working one day, she meets Wechsberg again when he comes to smoke and watch a movie. Later, as Louise leaves work, she is accosted by a masher. Spotting Wechsberg in the street, Louise claims that he is her husband and dismisses the young man. Wechsberg then walks Louise to her boardinghouse. As they sit on the front porch and discuss their dreams, Wechsberg impetuously invites Louise to an elite social gathering at the Savoy Ritz, at which he is working the following night. When Louise appears at the event in a borrowed gown, Wechsberg advises her to pretend to be a foreigner and mingle. The headwaiter soon discovers that Louise's name is not on the guest list, but Wechsberg claims that she is one of the entertainers. After sitting down at one of the tables, Louise is joined by J. Conrad Nelson, an elderly, philandering meat magnate. When Nelson, the party's host, begins to question Louise, Wechsberg tells him that she is there to perform and Nelson then asks her to sing. To save Wechsberg's job, Louise sings and so impresses the audience that Nelson insists she accompany him upstairs to his penthouse. Thinking that Louise is an aspiring young singer who has crashed his party to attract his attention, Nelson offers to star her in a musical. To discourage his attentions, Louise declares that she is already married, prompting Nelson to offer to buy her out of her marriage by financially compensating her husband for his loss. Seeing an opportunity to help the struggling George, Louise hands Nelson his business card and tells him that George is her husband. The next day, Nelson visits George in his shabby storefront office and offers to appoint him his company's legal representative. Suspicious, George thinks that Nelson is misrepresenting himself and dismisses him. Noticing that the lawyer's office walls are plastered with slogans proclaiming the virtue of honesty, Nelson dispels George's reservations by claiming that he needs an honest lawyer as a model for his staff. Soon after, Louise arrives at George's office door, and hearing the two men talking inside, hides in the hallway. As Nelson is about to leave the building, he spots Louise and insists that she come to his apartment the following evening. When Louise enters his office, George thinks that she has come to change her name. Ecstatic that his ethical virtues have finally been recognized, George is sure that fate has sent Louise to him and asks her to join him on his errands. Louise eventually convinces George to shave off his geezer-like beard, revealing a handsome young man. After a stroll in the moonlight, George proposes that Louise change her name to Prescott and declares his love for her. Feeling guilty for deceiving George, Louise demurs, and when George asks to see her the next night after his meeting with Nelson's board of directors, she tells him she already has a date. The next day, Nelson instructs his board of directors to keep George occupied while he romances Louise. At the business meeting, George questions the board's financial proposals and insists upon scrutinizing them further. Louise, meanwhile, enters Nelson's apartment and nervously blurts out that George is not her husband. When Wechsberg bursts into the apartment followed by George, Nelson is convinced that they are all involved in a conspiracy and informs George that he was hired only because Nelson believed him to be Louise's husband. Bitterly disappointed, George departs. Some time later, Nelson comes to George's office and, after informing him that his objections at the board meeting saved the company $200,000, insists that the lawyer honor his contract. Nelson then informs George that he has financed Wechsberg in his own restaurant and invites him to hear Louise sing at the opening that night. George refuses to attend, but as Louise eagerly awaits George's arrival, Wechsberg tries to conceal his absence from her. Just as Louise is about to take the stage to perform, George appears and they embrace in a dance of love. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.