West of Dodge City (1947)

56 or 59 mins | Western | 27 March 1947

Director:

Ray Nazarro

Writer:

Bert Horswell

Producer:

Colbert Clark

Cinematographer:

George F. Kelley

Production Designer:

Charles Clague

Production Company:

Columbia Pictures Corp.
Full page view
HISTORY

The working title of this film was Trigger Law . The picture opens with an offscreen narrator describing the "crooked schemes foisted on the unsuspecting population" and "the appearance of a mysterious rider known as The Durango Kid, a champion of law and order." For additional information about "The Durango Kid" series, please consult the Series Index and see the entry above for The Return of the Durango Kid ... More Less

The working title of this film was Trigger Law . The picture opens with an offscreen narrator describing the "crooked schemes foisted on the unsuspecting population" and "the appearance of a mysterious rider known as The Durango Kid, a champion of law and order." For additional information about "The Durango Kid" series, please consult the Series Index and see the entry above for The Return of the Durango Kid . More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
29 Mar 1947.
---
Daily Variety
9 May 1947.
---
Film Daily
26 Mar 47
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
9 May 47
p. 3.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
Orig scr, Orig scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
SOUND
Sd tech
SOURCES
SONGS
"Can't Cry for Laughin'" and "Cricket Song," words and music by Smiley Burnette
"The Circus Parade" and "Satchel Up and Go," words and music by Frank Rice and Ernest L. Stokes.
DETAILS
Series:
Alternate Title:
Trigger Law
Release Date:
27 March 1947
Production Date:
11 September--19 September 1946
Copyright Claimant:
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
27 March 1947
Copyright Number:
LP930
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
56 or 59
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
12114
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Henry Hardison, an unscrupulous Silver Bend businessman, offers to buy John Avery's ranch, claiming that he wants to turn the property into a reservoir for a power project. After Avery, who opposes the project, rejects Hardison's offer, the two men leave on the next stagecoach. Once outside of town, Hardison's men ambush the stage, while inside the coach, Hardison pulls a gun and shoots Avery. Steve Ramsey, a surveyor hired by Avery, witnesses the ambush and drives off the attackers. Feigning a fear of weapons and violence, Hardison pretends to be an innocent victim of the outlaws. However, when the stage returns to River Bend, Smiley Burnette, the local newspaper publisher, accuses Hardison of engineering Avery's murder. In his defense, Hardison claims that Avery had finally endorsed the project after conferring with a surveyor. Soon after, Steve enters the newspaper office and, after informing Smiley that he was the surveyor hired by Avery, declares that Avery never acquiesced to the project. When Smiley prints a disclaimer about Hardison's story of the surveyor, Hardison and his accomplice Borger storm into the newspaper office and demand that Smiley turn the paper over to them. Just then, The Durango Kid, the masked champion of justice and Steve's alter-ego, appears and prevents them from consummating the deal. Soon after, Steve conducts a survey of the ranch with Hod Barker, a close friend of the Avery family. As Steve declares that the ranch will never be able to serve as a natural reservoir, Hardison's gang, bent on suppressing his opinion, descends from the hills. Steve quickly disappears into the trees, then re-emerges as The Durango ... +


Henry Hardison, an unscrupulous Silver Bend businessman, offers to buy John Avery's ranch, claiming that he wants to turn the property into a reservoir for a power project. After Avery, who opposes the project, rejects Hardison's offer, the two men leave on the next stagecoach. Once outside of town, Hardison's men ambush the stage, while inside the coach, Hardison pulls a gun and shoots Avery. Steve Ramsey, a surveyor hired by Avery, witnesses the ambush and drives off the attackers. Feigning a fear of weapons and violence, Hardison pretends to be an innocent victim of the outlaws. However, when the stage returns to River Bend, Smiley Burnette, the local newspaper publisher, accuses Hardison of engineering Avery's murder. In his defense, Hardison claims that Avery had finally endorsed the project after conferring with a surveyor. Soon after, Steve enters the newspaper office and, after informing Smiley that he was the surveyor hired by Avery, declares that Avery never acquiesced to the project. When Smiley prints a disclaimer about Hardison's story of the surveyor, Hardison and his accomplice Borger storm into the newspaper office and demand that Smiley turn the paper over to them. Just then, The Durango Kid, the masked champion of justice and Steve's alter-ego, appears and prevents them from consummating the deal. Soon after, Steve conducts a survey of the ranch with Hod Barker, a close friend of the Avery family. As Steve declares that the ranch will never be able to serve as a natural reservoir, Hardison's gang, bent on suppressing his opinion, descends from the hills. Steve quickly disappears into the trees, then re-emerges as The Durango Kid and disperses the outlaws. Soon after, Avery's brash son Danny agrees to sell his share of the ranch to Hardison, but Anne, his sister, refuses to relinquish her half. To coerce Anne into selling, Hardison frames Danny for robbing the loan office. Although Danny is jailed for robbery, Anne, unable to afford her brother's legal defense, still steadfastly refuses to sell the ranch. When Hardison launches a campaign of terror against the ranch, however, Anne considers giving into him, causing a frustrated Hod to break Danny out of jail. After The Durango Kid orders Hardison to leave town, Hardison pretends to accede to his demand, all the while planning to blow up the river and flood the ranch. After the sheriff locates Danny and Hod's hideout, Anne rides to warn them about the flood, unaware that Dirk and Flint, two of Hardison's men, are following her. As Dirk and Flint fire at Hod and Danny, Steve, drawn by the sound of gunshots, rides to the rescue. When Smiley warns Steve that he witnessed Hardison burying blasting powder along the river's north ridge, the three race to stop him, arriving just in time to see Hardison deploying the explosives, thus blowing up the river and flooding the valley. After The Durango Kid, Smiley and Danny take refuge on high ground, The Durango Kid spots Hardison clinging for his life to a boulder and apprehends him. Once the river is dammed, Danny is exonerated, and Steve, his mission completed, rides off. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.