Dangerous Years (1948)

62 mins | Drama | February 1948

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HISTORY

Two contemporary sources attribute the music score to Rudy Schrager. Dangerous Years marked Marilyn Monroe's screen debut. She had previously appeared in Scudda Hoo! Scudda Hay! (see below), but her role was cut before the film's ... More Less

Two contemporary sources attribute the music score to Rudy Schrager. Dangerous Years marked Marilyn Monroe's screen debut. She had previously appeared in Scudda Hoo! Scudda Hay! (see below), but her role was cut before the film's release. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
20 Dec 1947.
---
Film Daily
19 Dec 1947.
---
Hollywood Reporter
18 Jul 47
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Jul 47
p. 18.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Dec 47
p. 3.
Independent Film Journal
2 Aug 47
p. 39.
Variety
17 Dec 47
p. 8.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITER
Story and scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
MUSIC
Mus supv
Mus score
SOUND
Sd tech
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod asst
DETAILS
Release Date:
February 1948
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 16 January 1948
Production Date:
15 July--31 July 1947
Copyright Claimant:
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
23 December 1947
Copyright Number:
LP1890
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
62
Length(in feet):
5,617
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
PCA No:
12677
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

When the Gopher Hole, a new jukebox roadhouse, opens near the small city of Middleton, many residents become concerned that the club will corrupt their teenage sons and daughters. Some of the complaints about the club eventually reach history teacher and boys club organizer Jeff Carter, who decides to investigate the club on his own. One day, Jeff catches teenagers Willy Miller, Gene Spooner, the flamboyant, trouble-making newcomer, Danny Jones, and others planning to rob a warehouse. When Jeff tries to prevent the boys from going through with the theft, a scuffle ensues. During the fight, Jeff is shot and killed by Danny, and Danny and his pals quickly flee the scene of the murder. Before they escape, however, an employee at the warehouse notes the name printed on the side of their getaway truck, which belongs to Willy's father. Danny and his pals take refuge at the Gopher Hole, where they assemble around a poker table and act as if they have been playing there all night. Police detectives arrive a short time later, and when they find alcohol on the premises, they arrest the boys. Danny is eventually charged with the murder, and because he is the only one among his group of friends who is not a minor, District Attorney Edgar Burns decides to prosecute only him, and prosecute him to the fullest degree. Danny's trial begins with Burns's impassioned argument that the murder was premeditated and that it was motivated by the youth's hatred for Jeff's boys club. Leo Emerson, leader of the boys club, testifies that soon after winning the admiration of the boys on the school basketball team, Danny introduced them to the ... +


When the Gopher Hole, a new jukebox roadhouse, opens near the small city of Middleton, many residents become concerned that the club will corrupt their teenage sons and daughters. Some of the complaints about the club eventually reach history teacher and boys club organizer Jeff Carter, who decides to investigate the club on his own. One day, Jeff catches teenagers Willy Miller, Gene Spooner, the flamboyant, trouble-making newcomer, Danny Jones, and others planning to rob a warehouse. When Jeff tries to prevent the boys from going through with the theft, a scuffle ensues. During the fight, Jeff is shot and killed by Danny, and Danny and his pals quickly flee the scene of the murder. Before they escape, however, an employee at the warehouse notes the name printed on the side of their getaway truck, which belongs to Willy's father. Danny and his pals take refuge at the Gopher Hole, where they assemble around a poker table and act as if they have been playing there all night. Police detectives arrive a short time later, and when they find alcohol on the premises, they arrest the boys. Danny is eventually charged with the murder, and because he is the only one among his group of friends who is not a minor, District Attorney Edgar Burns decides to prosecute only him, and prosecute him to the fullest degree. Danny's trial begins with Burns's impassioned argument that the murder was premeditated and that it was motivated by the youth's hatred for Jeff's boys club. Leo Emerson, leader of the boys club, testifies that soon after winning the admiration of the boys on the school basketball team, Danny introduced them to the Gopher Hole. Leo concludes his testimony by recalling how Danny tried to punch Jeff for suggesting that he was a bad influence on the boys. When Willy testifies that his alcoholic father August gave him a terrible whipping to force him to confess his involvement in the murder, Judge Raymond scolds August and blames him for causing Willy's involvement in street gangs. Only moments after the prosecution rests its case, a scandal erupts when Connie Burns, the district attorney's daughter, reveals that she and Danny had known each other ten years earlier at an orphanage. Forced to explain how Connie came to live at an orphanage, Edgar tells Danny's attorney and members of the press that Connie was born after he had his marriage to his wife annulled, and that he discovered that he was the father of a child when contacted by orphanage matron Miss Templeton. Connie pits herself against Edgar and tries to help Danny, but Danny is eventually convicted. After the trial, Miss Templeton confesses to Danny that he is Edgar's son, and that she lied about Connie's parentage to get Connie some much-needed medical attention. Realizing that the revelation will only hurt Connie, Danny asks Miss Templeton to continue suppressing her secret, and quietly accepts his life sentence in prison. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.