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HISTORY

The film's working titles were Hirohito's Children and Kamikaze . The film begins with the following written announcement: "Exhibition of confiscated Japanese film material authorized by permission of the Alien Property Custodian in the public interest under license no. LM-979." This is followed by the following written foreword: "There are those who say that World War III is not inevitable. They believe it can be avoided when enough people really begin to understand that behind all wars of aggression there is a racket. This is a picture about that racket."
       Newsreel and re-enacted footage are combined in the film. According to an 18 Jan 1948 NYT article, pre-production on the film began in 1946. Although modern sources claim that the picture was edited from eight million feet of captured film, the NYT article noted that RKO purchased only 4,325 feet of film for a cost of $11,000. [This is the length of the released film, according to information deposited with the Copyright Office.] During the two years it took to edit the film, a lessening of war hysteria in the U.S. and changing American attitudes toward the Japanese people necessitated the elimination of much of the "hate" footage. The NYT review states that the film "obviously avoids a careful analysis" of Japanese social and political history. Writer Theodor S. Geisel, whom modern sources note was an "Oriental expert," later became known as "Dr. Seuss," one of the most popular children's book authors of all time. Together with Helen Geisel, his wife, he wrote The Cat in the Hat . The film won an ... More Less

The film's working titles were Hirohito's Children and Kamikaze . The film begins with the following written announcement: "Exhibition of confiscated Japanese film material authorized by permission of the Alien Property Custodian in the public interest under license no. LM-979." This is followed by the following written foreword: "There are those who say that World War III is not inevitable. They believe it can be avoided when enough people really begin to understand that behind all wars of aggression there is a racket. This is a picture about that racket."
       Newsreel and re-enacted footage are combined in the film. According to an 18 Jan 1948 NYT article, pre-production on the film began in 1946. Although modern sources claim that the picture was edited from eight million feet of captured film, the NYT article noted that RKO purchased only 4,325 feet of film for a cost of $11,000. [This is the length of the released film, according to information deposited with the Copyright Office.] During the two years it took to edit the film, a lessening of war hysteria in the U.S. and changing American attitudes toward the Japanese people necessitated the elimination of much of the "hate" footage. The NYT review states that the film "obviously avoids a careful analysis" of Japanese social and political history. Writer Theodor S. Geisel, whom modern sources note was an "Oriental expert," later became known as "Dr. Seuss," one of the most popular children's book authors of all time. Together with Helen Geisel, his wife, he wrote The Cat in the Hat . The film won an Academy Award for Best Documentary in 1947. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
31 Jan 1948.
---
Daily Variety
27 Jan 48
p. 3.
Film Daily
29 Jan 48
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Mar 46
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
6 Dec 46
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
30 Dec 47
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Jan 48
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Apr 48
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald
28 Feb 1948.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
28 Feb 48
p. 4077, 4079
New York Times
18 Jan 1948.
---
New York Times
11 Jun 48
p. 27.
Variety
28 Jan 48
p. 20.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT

NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
WRITERS
Wrt for scr by
Wrt for scr by
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Film ed
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOUND
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
PRODUCTION MISC
Film research by
Film research by
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Kamikaze
Hirohito's Children
Release Date:
August 1948
Premiere Information:
Chicago premiere: 14 April 1948
New York opening: 10 June 1948
Copyright Claimant:
RKO Radio Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
14 April 1948
Copyright Number:
MP3075
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
48
Length(in feet):
4,324
Country:
United States
PCA No:
11471
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Using newsreel and re-enacted footage, this documentary attempts to describe the historical forces that culminated in the Japanese aggression during World War II. The filmmakers contend that a concentration of power in too few hands can lead to war. Until the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1941, most Americans believed that the Japanese were a mild, polite people, nature-loving, home-loving and nice to their children. After the war, opinion changed, and the Japanese were considered crazy and blood-thirsty. Using dramatic re-enactments, the filmmakers depict Japan 700 years earlier when battles among feudal families, fought by professional soldiers known as samurai, divided the country. If a samurai failed in his duties, he was invited to commit hara-kiri. The samurai collected taxes from the people and killed or bullied those who protested. At the same time, in England, the common people rose up against their tyrant, and the idea of personal freedom spread through Europe. When the idea of personal freedom reached Japan, a six-month rebellion broke out and 37,000 people were killed. To prevent a recurrence, the Japanese government isolated the country. Meanwhile, in the West, the American and French revolutions were fought. In Japan, the emperor was worshipped as the son of heaven. A re-enactment of the arrival of Admiral Matthew Perry's fleet in Japan to establish a trading agreement is used to demonstrate that the new ideas he brought with him threatened the power structure. Then, the filmmakers assert, Shinto was made the state religion and was used to convince the people that they were members of a master race. Using newsreel footage, the film shows ... +


Using newsreel and re-enacted footage, this documentary attempts to describe the historical forces that culminated in the Japanese aggression during World War II. The filmmakers contend that a concentration of power in too few hands can lead to war. Until the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1941, most Americans believed that the Japanese were a mild, polite people, nature-loving, home-loving and nice to their children. After the war, opinion changed, and the Japanese were considered crazy and blood-thirsty. Using dramatic re-enactments, the filmmakers depict Japan 700 years earlier when battles among feudal families, fought by professional soldiers known as samurai, divided the country. If a samurai failed in his duties, he was invited to commit hara-kiri. The samurai collected taxes from the people and killed or bullied those who protested. At the same time, in England, the common people rose up against their tyrant, and the idea of personal freedom spread through Europe. When the idea of personal freedom reached Japan, a six-month rebellion broke out and 37,000 people were killed. To prevent a recurrence, the Japanese government isolated the country. Meanwhile, in the West, the American and French revolutions were fought. In Japan, the emperor was worshipped as the son of heaven. A re-enactment of the arrival of Admiral Matthew Perry's fleet in Japan to establish a trading agreement is used to demonstrate that the new ideas he brought with him threatened the power structure. Then, the filmmakers assert, Shinto was made the state religion and was used to convince the people that they were members of a master race. Using newsreel footage, the film shows the formation of the first national Japanese army and the capture and annexation of Manchuko. Most Americans ignored this war, which seemed very far away. While maintaining the outward image of a peaceful, free country, the Japanese government quietly began to manufacture weapons and build an army. Inside Japan, some people spoke out against the empire, demanding to know why money was being spent on the military while so many lived in poverty. Japanese officials responded by banning dangerous thought. Spies were everywhere. Newsreel footage then depicts the growing nationalistic movement in Japan, which was fueled by the Japanese soldiers' belief that their souls would live on even after their death. Actual battle scenes show the escalation of the war, including rapid attacks on China, French Indo-China, Pearl Harbor, Wake Island, Shanghai, Guam and many other places in the Far East. Japan's surrender after the dropping of the atomic bomb is also depicted, and the filmmakers note that while the Japanese paid a high price during the war, the United States also paid a price in lost lives because it ignored events in Japan, Germany and Italy. The filmmakers make the point that war will only stop when well-educated people all over the world develop strong, representative governments. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.