Night Time in Nevada (1948)

66-67 mins | Western | 5 September 1948

Director:

William Witney

Writer:

Sloan Nibley

Cinematographer:

Jack Marta

Editor:

Tony Martinelli

Production Designer:

Frank Hotaling

Production Company:

Republic Pictures Corp.
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HISTORY

The working title for the film was Westerner and the Lady . According to a Var news item, Mel Tucker was originally scheduled to produce the film. Modern sources include Bob Reeves and Forrest Taylor in the ... More Less

The working title for the film was Westerner and the Lady . According to a Var news item, Mel Tucker was originally scheduled to produce the film. Modern sources include Bob Reeves and Forrest Taylor in the cast. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
30 Oct 1948.
---
Daily Variety
21 Oct 48
p. 3.
Film Daily
1 Nov 48
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Apr 48
p. 19.
Hollywood Reporter
7 May 48
p. 13.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Oct 48
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
21 Aug 48
p. 4283.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
30 Oct 48
p. 4365.
Variety
28 Jul 1947.
---
Variety
27 Oct 48
p. 9.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
Assoc prod
WRITER
Orig scr, Orig scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
COSTUMES
Cost supv
MUSIC
Mus score
Mus dir
SOUND
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Makeup supv
Hair
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Scr supv
SOURCES
SONGS
"When It's Nighttime in Nevada," music and lyrics by Richard W. Pascoe, Will E. Dulmage and H. O'Reilly Clint
"Sweet Laredo Lou," music and lyrics by Edward Morrissey and Bob Nolan
"Over Nevada," music and lyrics by Tim Spencer
+
SONGS
"When It's Nighttime in Nevada," music and lyrics by Richard W. Pascoe, Will E. Dulmage and H. O'Reilly Clint
"Sweet Laredo Lou," music and lyrics by Edward Morrissey and Bob Nolan
"Over Nevada," music and lyrics by Tim Spencer
"The Big Rock Candy Mountain," traditional.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Nighttime in Nevada
Westerner and the Lady
Release Date:
5 September 1948
Production Date:
late April--early May 1948
Copyright Claimant:
Republic Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
12 August 1948
Copyright Number:
LP1790
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Color
Trucolor
Duration(in mins):
66-67
Country:
United States
PCA No:
13202
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

In 1928, after Ran Farrell and his partner, Jim Andrews, strike gold in the "Lucky Jim" Mine, Farrell blows up the mine, intentionally killing Jim. Jim's dying request is that Farrell make sure that his daughter Joan receive her share of their profits. Farrell agrees to locate Grass Valley attorney Jason Howley, with whom Jim has entrusted his share of the gold they have so far mined, and buries Jim, taking his good luck charm: a silver dollar. The mine's vein soon dries up, and Farrell, who has followed the advice of a corrupt attorney named Mort Oakley, loses most of Joan's $50,000. Sixteen years later, Joan returns to claim her money, and Farrell becomes desperate. When Farrell learns that cowboy Roy Rogers plans to ship a herd of cattle by train, he and Mort organize a gang of rustlers to steal it. The next day, Farrell's men are hired to load the cattle onto trucks, and the train departs. On the way, the conductor is murdered, and the train is robbed of its cargo without ever stopping. Police Sgt. "Cookie" Bullfincher deputizes Roy, and they go undercover, dressing as hoboes. At the train tracks, one hobo admits that he was on the train at the time of the robbery, but could not figure out how the cattle were removed. Later, Cookie and Roy break into Joan's trailer, and she and her friend, Toni Bordon, mistake them for burglars. Panicked, they lock the door and drive straight to the police station. After they realize their mistake, Joan asks Roy to find out where her father is buried. Joan then goes ... +


In 1928, after Ran Farrell and his partner, Jim Andrews, strike gold in the "Lucky Jim" Mine, Farrell blows up the mine, intentionally killing Jim. Jim's dying request is that Farrell make sure that his daughter Joan receive her share of their profits. Farrell agrees to locate Grass Valley attorney Jason Howley, with whom Jim has entrusted his share of the gold they have so far mined, and buries Jim, taking his good luck charm: a silver dollar. The mine's vein soon dries up, and Farrell, who has followed the advice of a corrupt attorney named Mort Oakley, loses most of Joan's $50,000. Sixteen years later, Joan returns to claim her money, and Farrell becomes desperate. When Farrell learns that cowboy Roy Rogers plans to ship a herd of cattle by train, he and Mort organize a gang of rustlers to steal it. The next day, Farrell's men are hired to load the cattle onto trucks, and the train departs. On the way, the conductor is murdered, and the train is robbed of its cargo without ever stopping. Police Sgt. "Cookie" Bullfincher deputizes Roy, and they go undercover, dressing as hoboes. At the train tracks, one hobo admits that he was on the train at the time of the robbery, but could not figure out how the cattle were removed. Later, Cookie and Roy break into Joan's trailer, and she and her friend, Toni Bordon, mistake them for burglars. Panicked, they lock the door and drive straight to the police station. After they realize their mistake, Joan asks Roy to find out where her father is buried. Joan then goes to Farrell, but he says he does not have her money. When a telegram reports that there is no record of Jim's death, Cookie checks the local banks for recent, large deposits. That night, Farrell locks Joan inside her trailer and siphons cooking gas inside, but Roy soon arrives and rescues her before she suffocates. Frustrated, Farrell comes out of his hiding place and attacks Roy. Meanwhile, at police headquarters, Cookie learns that Howley recently received a $20,000 money order from Reno. When Roy returns to Joan's trailer to deliver the telegram, he says that the rest of the cattle will be shipped the following day. The next morning, Howley returns to the jail, claiming that Farrell is really Jim Andrews and changed his name after being released from the penitentiary. When Howley produces documentation substantiating the claim, Roy is forced to release Farrell from jail. Later, Mort follows Joan and Roy to the mine, where Joan finds her father's coat among the debris. At Howley's office, Joan then demands her money, but they tie her up and place her in the next room. Roy slips into the room through the window, and for the benefit of the gang next door, pretends with Joan that he has been murdered. Farrell then murders Howley, and Roy goes to Devil's Pass to board the train. Further down the tracks, Roy sees the robbery taking place and comes to the rescue. After Farrell shoots Mort and escapes in one of the trucks, Roy follows. Roy sees Farrell fall from a cliff to his death below and gives Joan the lucky silver dollar that belonged to her father. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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