Panhandle (1948)

84 mins | Western | 22 February 1948

Director:

Lesley Selander

Cinematographer:

Harry Neumann

Production Designer:

David Milton

Production Company:

Allied Artists Productions, Inc.
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HISTORY

Director Lesley Selander's first name is misspelled "Leslie" in the onscreen credits. John Campion and Blake Edwards' onscreen credit reads: "Written and produced by J. C. Champion and Blake Edwards." Champion and Edwards, who until then had been bit actors, made their producing debuts with this film. Edwards also has a small role in the film. According to an Oct 1947 NYT article, Champion's father was a friend of A. P. Giannini of the Bank of America, who helped them get financing for the film. Champion and Edwards wrote Pandhandle with the intention of producing a 16mm picture, but after submitting the story to two studios, they were convinced that they had a good property. A deal was arranged with Steve Broidy, president of Monogram Pictures. The young producers raised $40,000, the banking interest put up $216,000 and Monogram provided $140,000, according to the article. Monogram also guaranteed funds for completion of the picture and agreed to pay for distribution prints. Location shooting was done at Lone Pine and in the San Fernando Valley, CA. In 1966, Selander and Champion loosely remade Panhandle as The Texican . That version, which was produced in Spain, starred Audie Murphy and Broderick Crawford (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1961-70 ; ... More Less

Director Lesley Selander's first name is misspelled "Leslie" in the onscreen credits. John Campion and Blake Edwards' onscreen credit reads: "Written and produced by J. C. Champion and Blake Edwards." Champion and Edwards, who until then had been bit actors, made their producing debuts with this film. Edwards also has a small role in the film. According to an Oct 1947 NYT article, Champion's father was a friend of A. P. Giannini of the Bank of America, who helped them get financing for the film. Champion and Edwards wrote Pandhandle with the intention of producing a 16mm picture, but after submitting the story to two studios, they were convinced that they had a good property. A deal was arranged with Steve Broidy, president of Monogram Pictures. The young producers raised $40,000, the banking interest put up $216,000 and Monogram provided $140,000, according to the article. Monogram also guaranteed funds for completion of the picture and agreed to pay for distribution prints. Location shooting was done at Lone Pine and in the San Fernando Valley, CA. In 1966, Selander and Champion loosely remade Panhandle as The Texican . That version, which was produced in Spain, starred Audie Murphy and Broderick Crawford (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1961-70 ; F6.4945). More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
31 Jan 1948.
---
Daily Variety
21 Jan 48
p. 4.
Film Daily
27 Jan 48
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Sep 47
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Sep 47
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Jan 48
p. 10.
Motion Picture Daily
23 Jan 1948.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
31 Jan 48
p. 4037.
New York Times
5 Oct 1947.
---
Variety
28 Jan 48
p. 11.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Supv film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
COSTUMES
Mens ward
SOUND
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Scr supv
DETAILS
Release Date:
22 February 1948
Production Date:
mid September--early October 1947
Copyright Claimant:
Allied Artists Productions, Inc.
Copyright Date:
7 March 1948
Copyright Number:
LP1541
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Black and White
sepia
Duration(in mins):
84
Length(in feet):
7,599
Country:
United States
PCA No:
12809
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In a Mexican border town, former outlaw John Sands has become a respected storekeeper. One day, a customer, Jean "Dusty" Stewart, tells him that her father is one of several people who were recently murdered in the Texas town of Sentinel. She also mentions that the town's outspoken newspaper owner, Billy Sands, was killed, unaware that Billy was John's brother. En route to Sentinel, John stops to buy a fresh horse and is spotted by a sheriff who knows him from his outlaw days. The sheriff tries to arrest him, but John shoots him in the hand. As he approaches Sentinel, John is attacked by three gunmen working for Matt Garson, owner of the Last Frontier Saloon, who is planning to become boss of the entire Texas panhandle. John outrides them, then in Sentinel, checks into the Blue Belle Hotel, where he meets June O'Carroll, Garson's secretary. John is soon approached by three of Sentinel's leading citizens, who want to hire him to clean up the town and drive Garson from the area, and John promises to think it over. After an encounter with Garson's hired gun, Floyd Schofield, John walks June back to her home, provoking Garson's jealousy. The next day, John rides out to the Stewart ranch and reveals to Dusty that he is Billy's brother. She tells John that she and Billy were to be married and shows him his grave. Later, John is shot at by Schofield but when John confronts Schofield about it at the saloon, Garson supplies him with an alibi, provoking John to brawl with Jack, another Garson henchman. After John escorts June to Sunday mass, Garson tells him to leave ... +


In a Mexican border town, former outlaw John Sands has become a respected storekeeper. One day, a customer, Jean "Dusty" Stewart, tells him that her father is one of several people who were recently murdered in the Texas town of Sentinel. She also mentions that the town's outspoken newspaper owner, Billy Sands, was killed, unaware that Billy was John's brother. En route to Sentinel, John stops to buy a fresh horse and is spotted by a sheriff who knows him from his outlaw days. The sheriff tries to arrest him, but John shoots him in the hand. As he approaches Sentinel, John is attacked by three gunmen working for Matt Garson, owner of the Last Frontier Saloon, who is planning to become boss of the entire Texas panhandle. John outrides them, then in Sentinel, checks into the Blue Belle Hotel, where he meets June O'Carroll, Garson's secretary. John is soon approached by three of Sentinel's leading citizens, who want to hire him to clean up the town and drive Garson from the area, and John promises to think it over. After an encounter with Garson's hired gun, Floyd Schofield, John walks June back to her home, provoking Garson's jealousy. The next day, John rides out to the Stewart ranch and reveals to Dusty that he is Billy's brother. She tells John that she and Billy were to be married and shows him his grave. Later, John is shot at by Schofield but when John confronts Schofield about it at the saloon, Garson supplies him with an alibi, provoking John to brawl with Jack, another Garson henchman. After John escorts June to Sunday mass, Garson tells him to leave town. June then tells Garson she wants nothing more to do with him and quits. When Schofield challenges John to a shootout in front of the saloon, John kills him and two others. John then has a final showdown with Garson, who he has determined was responsible for Billy's death, and with June's help, kills him. Later, John promises to return to June after he clears himself with the law. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.